LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
LinkBack Search this Thread
Old 04-09-2011, 12:08 PM   #1
alfa_80
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0
Best practise in Partitioning Slackware


Hi,

I am new to Slackware but I'm a bit familiar with Ubuntu. I normally partition my ubuntu using /swap, /root and /home. In ubuntu it is recommended to separate /home and /root partitions so that later on if something to be changed in the system we just need to apply on that /root without affecting our old data in /home. Is it the same way in Slackware applied?

If so, is it the same as having /swap, /root and /home partitions as well? Can anyone suggest for the harddisk distribution of my 320GB space..

Thanks in advance..

-alfa-
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:21 PM   #2
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,007

Rep: Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475
Yeah, that is the way I partition my Slackware boxes. I have swap, root, and home partitions. Having a separate home partition is nice as it makes upgrading to a new version of Slackware painless as you keep all of your data in home. The way that you allocate space for /root and /home will depend on what you plan to use your box for. I usually allocate more space for home than root.
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:25 PM   #3
alfa_80
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Posts: 9

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest View Post
Yeah, that is the way I partition my Slackware boxes. I have swap, root, and home partitions. Having a separate home partition is nice as it makes upgrading to a new version of Slackware painless as you keep all of your data in home. The way that you allocate space for /root and /home will depend on what you plan to use your box for. I usually allocate more space for home than root.
Thanks a lot for the information..That really helped!
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:29 PM   #4
gezley
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware64, NetBSD
Posts: 474

Rep: Reputation: 200Reputation: 200Reputation: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfa_80 View Post
Hi,

I am new to Slackware but I'm a bit familiar with Ubuntu. I normally partition my ubuntu using /swap, /root and /home. In ubuntu it is recommended to separate /home and /root partitions so that later on if something to be changed in the system we just need to apply on that /root without affecting our old data in /home. Is it the same way in Slackware applied?

If so, is it the same as having /swap, /root and /home partitions as well? Can anyone suggest for the harddisk distribution of my 320GB space..

Thanks in advance..

-alfa-
First of all, the root directory / should not be confused with the root user's home directory, which is /root, and swap is denoted as swap, not /swap

Second, I usually create separate partitions as follows:
Code:
/
swap
/tmp
/usr
/usr/local
/var
/var/log
/home
This is overkill for your needs.

At a minimum it is best if you create the following:
Code:
/
swap
/home
On a 320GB disk it would be safe enough to go with the following sizes:
Code:
/          15-20GB
swap       2-4GB
/home      the remainder
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:40 PM   #5
repo
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Slackware 14.0
Posts: 8,464

Rep: Reputation: 877Reputation: 877Reputation: 877Reputation: 877Reputation: 877Reputation: 877Reputation: 877
Quote:
This is overkill for your needs.
This is overkill for everyone :-)

Kind regards
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:45 PM   #6
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,007

Rep: Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by gezley View Post
First of all, the root directory / should not be confused with the root user's home directory, which is /root, and swap is denoted as swap, not /swap
Yeah, You're right, I should not have said /root when I meant /. Thanks for the correction.
Your partition scheme is excellent, however, for a newcomer to Slackware I think swap, /, and home will suffice. As the OP gains more experience in Slackware then he/she can further customize their HD layout.
Also, to the OP I suggest that you use cfdisk to partition your hard drive as that is a little more user friendly than fdisk. At the root prompt type:

# cfdisk /dev/sda
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:54 PM   #7
gezley
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware64, NetBSD
Posts: 474

Rep: Reputation: 200Reputation: 200Reputation: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by repo View Post
This is overkill for everyone :-)

It just means runaway log files and an overflowing /tmp dir don't bring the computer to its knees. It also means local software can be preserved when reinstalling. And finally I think it makes for a snappier disk. Yes it is overkill for the OP but I for one would never have learnt anything if other people hadn't explained these things to me at the beginning. It is always good to raise the level of knowledge, not to keep beginners forever at a low level.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-09-2011, 12:56 PM   #8
gezley
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware64, NetBSD
Posts: 474

Rep: Reputation: 200Reputation: 200Reputation: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest View Post
Yeah, You're right, I should not have said /root when I meant /. Thanks for the correction.
I was replying to the OP hitest but feel free to eavesdrop and learn from me.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-09-2011, 01:02 PM   #9
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,007

Rep: Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by gezley View Post
I was replying to the OP hitest but feel free to eavesdrop and learn from me.
Ha-ha, will do!
 
Old 04-09-2011, 01:59 PM   #10
pg99
Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 73

Rep: Reputation: 18
Doesn't anyone use LVM? As long as you leave some unallocated space and use a resizeable file-system, your initial choices are not so important as you have the freedom to change it around later.
 
Old 04-09-2011, 05:10 PM   #11
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Carrollton, Texas
Distribution: Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 1,318

Rep: Reputation: 353Reputation: 353Reputation: 353Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by pg99 View Post
Doesn't anyone use LVM? As long as you leave some unallocated space and use a resizeable file-system, your initial choices are not so important as you have the freedom to change it around later.
This is the way to go, IMO. If you use a file system that can be resized while mounted, it's even easier. Plus you can use pvmove to migrate data from one physical drive to the others so that you can replace it.
 
Old 04-10-2011, 03:35 AM   #12
adityavpratap
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Hyderabad, India
Distribution: Slackware 13, Ubuntu 12.04
Posts: 427

Rep: Reputation: 32
I normally use the following scheme for all my Linux installs -
/
/home
/usr
swap
 
Old 04-10-2011, 04:17 AM   #13
Intel_
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Bulgaria
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 103
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 20
I have separated /boot yet..
 
Old 04-10-2011, 05:27 AM   #14
JokerBoy
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 140

Rep: Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest View Post
Also, to the OP I suggest that you use cfdisk to partition your hard drive as that is a little more user friendly than fdisk.
and I suggest the OP to start learning using fdisk.

# fdisk -H 32 -S 32 /dev/sda

even better, he should start using GPT if he's not using M$ Windows.

Code:
/boot
swap
/
/home
 
Old 04-10-2011, 11:37 AM   #15
igadoter
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: wroclaw, poland
Distribution: slack 12.2, debian-Trinity , openbsd
Posts: 723

Rep: Reputation: 56
Do what you want. There is as I know only 4 DOS primary partition but you can also create extended partitions. Each directory may refer to a partition or device. Say your /home/myhome can be on your USB drive. This means all private files will be placed on that USB and during a boot USB will be mounted at /home/myhome. I used this solution for my 8 GB hard disk computer. I added an USB port on PCI and it was mounted as my user directory. You may also consider using LVM - I have no much experience in that but it may interesting.
 
  


Reply

Tags
partition


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dynamic bandwidth throttling for SFTP-uploads - looking for best practise murmur101 Linux - Software 2 08-24-2010 06:10 AM
Dual Booting Slackware, best Slackware based Distro, and Partitioning...? Novatian Slackware 6 06-07-2010 08:09 PM
LPIC 101 exam ceritifation practise dump needed latest salimshahzad Linux - Newbie 3 04-27-2010 11:13 AM
CLP practise exams Gayash Linux - Certification 1 01-28-2008 03:14 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:17 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration