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-   -   Another slacker! :) (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/another-slacker-611388/)

multios 01-05-2008 03:22 PM

Another slacker! :)
 
Got back a while ago from helping a client. Same one that gave me this 350 mhz machine.
For a while, I had her using PCLinuxOS, which she got used to. After being given a computer from her son, she tried using Xp. She needed some help from me getting things set up. Finally she asked if I could put linux back on for her since Windows was so "weird".
Since I don't have a current pclos cd on hand, I described Slackware to her and she said put it on.
Monday, I will bring her computer home and install Slackware 12 on it :)

I explained how she could have both systems installed because she needed the windows program that helps make her greeting cards and stuff besides some other programs.

Just wanted to share it :)

Alien_Hominid 01-05-2008 03:28 PM

Good. Check if it's possible to run that greeting stuff with wine.

Acron_0248 01-05-2008 03:32 PM

Hi,


You know, this is an interesting post because your client said 'windows was weird', it makes me remember the lots of times I've seen some linux-new-comer saying that Linux is weird, and the reason for that? he previously knew windows...

Is interesting because that makes people realize that there's no such thing as a weird system or a bad system or the like, there are just differences, and usually, we think that the 'non-weird' system is that one we know :)



Regards

H_TeXMeX_H 01-05-2008 04:08 PM

Well, you have to admit, there are many things about Window$ that don't make sense ... unless of course you take the point of view of Bill Gates (or Gate$).

Acron_0248 01-05-2008 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H (Post 3012665)
Well, you have to admit, there are many things about Window$ that don't make sense ... unless of course you take the point of view of Bill Gates (or Gate$).

Good point indeed ;)



Regards

BCarey 01-05-2008 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by multios (Post 3012627)
I explained how she could have both systems installed because she needed the windows program that helps make her greeting cards and stuff besides some other programs.

Suggest to her to try scribus for her greeting cards.

Brian

multios 01-05-2008 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BCarey (Post 3012691)
Suggest to her to try scribus for her greeting cards.

Brian

I will do that even though I don't know much of anything about it either ;)

hitest 01-05-2008 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BCarey (Post 3012691)
Suggest to her to try scribus for her greeting cards.

Brian

Hey, thanks for the tip:-) My daughter's 5th birthday is coming up and I needed greeting card software to make invitations for her party (I don't run windows). Just grabbed scribus from slackbuilds.org, it looks good.

BCarey 01-05-2008 09:16 PM

Between the gimp and scribus, you can do amazing graphics and layouts.

Brian

iiv 01-06-2008 04:53 AM

baby's comparison of wi/li
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Acron_0248 (Post 3012641)
You know, this is an interesting post because your client said 'windows was weird', it makes me remember the lots of times I've seen some linux-new-comer saying that Linux is weird, and the reason for that? he previously knew windows...

That is not amazing. A good friend of mine points to a survey where it was discovered that command-line interface is much more intuitive than graphical. But when a user gets used to graphical, you all know what happens.
What have I noticed about slackers: no fear of command line.

Yesterday I installed a Slackware on my former classmate's machine. And what do you expect? He immediately found golf-game in KDE and spent half the evening playing it, involving his little 10-years-old sister. She said "wow... Linux is a great deal. Is that a default game for the system?.. Wow... Windows can suggest nothing of this type."

onebuck 01-06-2008 06:58 AM

Hi,

Quote:

Originally Posted by iiv (Post 3013081)
That is not amazing. A good friend of mine points to a survey where it was discovered that command-line interface is much more intuitive than graphical. But when a user gets used to graphical, you all know what happens.
What have I noticed about slackers: no fear of command line.

Yesterday I installed a Slackware on my former classmate's machine. And what do you expect? He immediately found golf-game in KDE and spent half the evening playing it, involving his little 10-years-old sister. She said "wow... Linux is a great deal. Is that a default game for the system?.. Wow... Windows can suggest nothing of this type."

Not debating! I would like to know how the cli would be intuitive? If you don't know the commands or simple syntax of a command then you will get no where. Do you have a link to that survey?

Quote:

Originally Posted by iiv (Post 3013081)
He immediately found golf-game in KDE and spent half the evening playing it, involving his little 10-years-old sister. She said "wow... Linux is a great deal. Is that a default game for the system?.. Wow... Windows can suggest nothing of this type."

Most gaming does take over the person! Sure the simple of it seems to be the entertainment value. I'm not a gamer. My wife likes them but she won't have a game system because of the addiction. She says too much wasted time for her.

I guess my system(s) maintenance doesn't count?

paperplane 01-06-2008 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iiv (Post 3013081)
What have I noticed about slackers: no fear of command line.

true :)

my only hesitation with the CL is having to type in long commands, because im lazy! and after that one can get around future inconvieniences with bash history, scripts, etc.

Acron_0248 01-06-2008 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iiv (Post 3013081)
That is not amazing. A good friend of mine points to a survey where it was discovered that command-line interface is much more intuitive than graphical. But when a user gets used to graphical, you all know what happens.

Ehhhrr....ok :)

No offense, but I don't see how is that related with what I've said =/

Nor I can't see how the CLI is more intuitive than graphical environments, I mean, if you get in gnome from the first time and you see at the topbar 'Applications' you think 'ohh..that's where the applications should be, let me check', if you are in the command line for the first time and see '[user@host]:$_' how is that more intuitive?




Regards

iiv 01-06-2008 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by onebuck (Post 3013158)
Not debating! I would like to know how the cli would be intuitive? If you don't know the commands or simple syntax of a command then you will get no where. Do you have a link to that survey?

OK, I'll ask him where he got it, now I'm interested in it too.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Acron_0248
I mean, if you get in gnome from the first time and you see at the topbar 'Applications' you think 'ohh..that's where the applications should be, let me check', if you are in the command line for the first time and see '[user@host]:$_' how is that more intuitive?

Here it comes. Just a question. How did you get familiar with computers? Did you use graphical or CL interface? The intuitiveness of cl is in it's simpleness. Just command -- answer, command -- answer, and so on. You don't need to learn much, don't need to learn how this happens. You just need to know which commands are there. Where -- doesn't matter for an end user, they are at the $PATH.
Which is easier? To get along with CL or with graphical? Which is faster. The key simpleness lies at the base of CL.

Road_map 01-06-2008 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acron_0248 (Post 3013271)
if you are in the command line for the first time and see '[user@host]:$_' how is that more intuitive?

Press TAB key twice? :-)


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