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Old 01-15-2008, 11:58 PM   #46
leutzdb
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One possible disadvantage


I've heard from someone that Slackware has one fault he's only seen otherwise in Debian: Cannot have a larger than 500GB root partition.

I told the guy "Why not just make a small "root" and leave the rest as "home" or even make a "data" partition?"

Works for me!

Dave
 
Old 04-16-2008, 01:19 PM   #47
digger95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger95 View Post
I have to admit that I am really struggling with the package management/dependencies issue right now.
Found this old post of mine when I was doing a forum search and wanted to report that after several months I now consider Slackware's package management to be one of it's strong points. Using mainly slackbuilds and src2pkg, package management in Slackware really is quite nifty. I love knowing exactly what files are being installed and where, and when I uninstall a package I know exactly what is being removed. The other day I was helping a friend with Ubuntu and when he was updating his system it just seemed like there was no control over what was being installed. Man there were files flying all over the place. God only knows what all got installed.

Dig

Last edited by digger95; 04-16-2008 at 01:20 PM.
 
Old 04-16-2008, 04:06 PM   #48
iiv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger95 View Post
The other day I was helping a friend with Ubuntu and when he was updating his system it just seemed like there was no control over what was being installed. Man there were files flying all over the place. God only knows what all got installed.
I've never ever tried any other distro but Slackware. And after these words, I know what exactly I will not ever try
 
Old 04-16-2008, 11:18 PM   #49
T3slider
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It's still possible to determine exactly what is being installed on your system using Ubuntu, OpenSUSE, or any other distro. And it's really not that difficult either (you can always make your own packages, although it may not be as friendly as in Slackware). It just isn't as transparent as on Slackware. Well, it is -- but it isn't. It's hard to explain. Slackware isn't really much more "open" than other distros, it just forces you to see everything. Other distros allow the same openness, but they provide other tools that don't show you everything. You can use Debian or Ubuntu while compiling all of your programs from source -- but it negates the whole point of using a Debian-based distro with its lovely apt-get and dependency-resolving goodness. It seems like because the other distros don't absolutely force you to pay attention to what you install, people assume you can't pay attention. This is false.

However, using Synaptic in Ubuntu (for which there is no true equivalent in Slackware) makes me a little nervous seeing all of those packages install without me knowing exactly what's happening (one badly created package and BAM! SYSTEM DOWN!). Basically, you are using the full ability of these other distros when you don't have to, and are blaming their utilities for unstable (or closed, opaque) systems, just because there isn't an equivalent in Slackware.

iiv, you should never completely judge a distro based on other people's words. If I did that, then I never would have installed the 'aging dinosaur' I currently use (Slackware). Ubuntu is a great distro, and sometimes when I encounter a program with 3 million dependencies, I secretly wish for apt-get. But then I regain my senses and remember that I compile (almost) everything from source just so I know exactly what's going on my system (paranoid much?). I also love Slackware's simplicity and stability (though I have never used Ubuntu or OpenSUSE long enough to experience a crash). Hence I use Slackware -- but I would be pretty happy using other distros as well. Try it out for yourself in a VM or on a separate partition or different PC. It's not THAT bad, it's just not for me.

Last edited by T3slider; 04-16-2008 at 11:20 PM.
 
Old 04-17-2008, 12:52 AM   #50
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T3slider View Post
It seems like because the other distros don't absolutely force you to pay attention to what you install, people assume you can't pay attention. This is false.
I don't know about that. One thing I don't like about RedHat and Debian based distros is the fact that they use binary package databases. As someone who is used to Slackware, this is something I find to be very limiting. For starters, you can't use standard GNU tools to explore the database. By comparison, Slackware's package "database" (found under /var/log/packages) is 100% compatible with standard GNU tools. Wanna know what package "/usr/bin/somecommand" is from? Simply:

grep -r "usr/bin/somecommand" /var/log/packages

It really is as easy as that. You can't do that with Debian or RedHat without learning the intricacies of their own packaging tools.

Slackware's honesty and openness in this regard is just something else I like about it.
 
Old 04-17-2008, 05:21 AM   #51
digger95
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Originally Posted by iiv View Post
I've never ever tried any other distro but Slackware. And after these words, I know what exactly I will not ever try
I certainly hope I didn't give the impression I was Ubuntu-bashing. As I've said in other threads, I have great respect for it as a gateway distro into Linux and always recommend it to my Windows friends who are thinking of switching. I was just saying that now I'm used to Slackware's package management I could never go back to an automated process. It was a bit unsettling watching all those updates download and install like that.

Last edited by digger95; 04-17-2008 at 05:22 AM.
 
Old 04-17-2008, 06:38 AM   #52
iiv
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Even after that, I will not give it a try, because there are no any issues in Slackware GNU/Linux which cause me to do so. May be this could be read as famous "don't fix if ain't broken".
 
  


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