LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 11-04-2007, 07:11 AM   #31
elluva
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Belguim, Ostend and Ghent
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 600

Rep: Reputation: 30

The basic slack install is indeed stable, because slack doesn't use alpha versions in its release, but after that, it is up to you. If you install a development kernel or a alpha version of gnome, kde or dbus there's no telling how (un)stable your system will be.
This statement is valid for speed as well, the standard slackware installation is lightning fast, but if you install all the fancy *bling* (read: compiz ) it will be just as slow as let's say fedora. On the other side it possible to take ubuntu and slim it down to a very fast system.

There is also another side to not having a package manager, no automatic patches or security updates! This is an important downside, because it takes a lot of time to track down and apply all patches for every piece of software installed on your system.

Besides from that, slackware is the most versatile distro out there, I used it for 2 years (8.1, 9.1 and 10) and was quite happy about it. Slackware is absolutely the purest linux, but I exchanged it for debian, which has in my opinion all the upsides of slackware plus the package manager.

Now I use ubuntu because I simply no longer have enough time to spend on maintaining my system, but I still like like slackware.

Last edited by elluva; 11-04-2007 at 10:30 AM.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 10:28 AM   #32
H_TeXMeX_H
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269
Quote:
Originally Posted by elluva View Post
Now I use ubuntu because I simple no longer have enough time to spend on maintaining my system, but I still like like slackware.
I hear that a lot, but I don't understand it. Maintaining the system ? I do system maintenance about once a month and it takes only about 1 hr.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 10:39 AM   #33
elluva
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Belguim, Ostend and Ghent
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 600

Rep: Reputation: 30
Not if you want your security updates and patches to be installed. Often I quickly need to install a piece of software and don't have the time to search for all the dependencies and compile the sources. The fact is that I no longer use slack because those things take too much time.

Of course, if you never install updates and you have a stable set of tools, so you don't often have to install new software, it is possible that maintaining your system won't take much time.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 11:58 AM   #34
maniac matt
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Location: Beantown
Distribution: Arch Linux
Posts: 30

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
so far i have enjoyed my experience on Slack 12.

I have sucessfully installed Beryl (because i like it) and Wifi-radar and Wlassistant.

I am not quite sure i would be able to maintain my system, because i am a linux noob.

anyone have any ideas to point me in the direction?

oh and, are there any package managers that Slack could use? I know Slapt-get.. but is there anything else?


anyway, thank you all.

matt
 
Old 11-04-2007, 02:14 PM   #35
Zmyrgel
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Finland
Distribution: Slackware, CentOS, RHEL, OpenBSD
Posts: 1,006

Rep: Reputation: 36
If I would put some Linux on my computer it would be Slackware.

Slackware teached a lot about Linux to me... I currently run solely OpenBSD on my computers but I'm thinking about putting Slackware to my desktop. The lack of 3D-acceleration support is not a good think if your thinking about developing OpenGL programs
 
Old 11-04-2007, 03:30 PM   #36
globaltree
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Location: Oregon
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 65

Rep: Reputation: 18
Cool after you fix it, it just works

I am a new slackware user, and linux user in general, and I chose slackware because:

1. I am Bob Dobbs.
2. I can tell my wife I slacked off all day, and she can't get mad.
3. I figured that, since slackware doesn't hold your hand, that the level of linux experience would be higher in its user base, and therefore, the advice I receive in the slackware forums is likely to be better informed than any advice I would receive in the ubuntu forums from a three day ubuntu user who still tells me to restart.

Last edited by globaltree; 11-04-2007 at 04:05 PM. Reason: can't psell
 
Old 11-04-2007, 03:54 PM   #37
digger95
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Location: Indiana, PA
Distribution: Slackware 14
Posts: 330

Rep: Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen View Post
Devede (while probably not as powerful as ManDVD) has worked for me as far as converting files of various formats to DVD compatible mpeg2 and generating DVD content/iso files. It also has a relatively short dependancy list, many of which are good to have in place anyway.
rkelsen,

Thanks for the heads-up about DeVeDe! I will certainly look into it. I'm using convertxtodvd under wine right now so I can at least get my work done while I put together a native-Linux solution. I don't like running Windows apps on my nice new Slackware install but if it preserves my sanity AND keeps me from chucking the whole lot out the window, then I feel it's a good thing. And I did pay 40 bucks for the license so I might as well use it if I can.

It is also a huge relief to hear that even yourself (a savvy Slackware user) gets frustrated with dependencies from time to time. It makes me feel not so much like an idiot. So thanks for that.

In response to the original question though... Slackware really IS a lot to handle for folks like me who are new to Linux altogether. But to be honest, once I got to a certain point it just kinda got under my skin and I couldn't give it up. So now I'm forced to learn as I go. The advantages of Slackware far outweigh the disadvantages.

Dig

Last edited by digger95; 11-04-2007 at 04:17 PM.
 
Old 11-05-2007, 05:54 AM   #38
ajacoutot
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zmyrgel View Post
I currently run solely OpenBSD on my computers but I'm thinking about putting Slackware to my desktop. The lack of 3D-acceleration support is not a good think if your thinking about developing OpenGL programs
While being OT, DRI support under OpenBSD is actually being worked on.
 
Old 11-05-2007, 06:43 AM   #39
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,139
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by maniac matt View Post
I am not quite sure i would be able to maintain my system, because i am a linux noob.

anyone have any ideas to point me in the direction?

oh and, are there any package managers that Slack could use? I know Slapt-get.. but is there anything else?


anyway, thank you all.

matt
You can use Slackpkg or Slapt-get to install security updates,etc. I use Slackpkg. Check the change log on the Slackware site every now & then, then do:

# slackpkg update
# slackpkg upgrade-all

Easy as that.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 03:02 AM   #40
pappy_mcfae
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Dallas
Distribution: Gentoo x86 & x86_64
Posts: 190

Rep: Reputation: 30
The greatest disadvantage to Slackware is the people who populate its forum.

Blessed be!
Pappy
 
Old 01-15-2008, 07:53 AM   #41
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,139
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by pappy_mcfae View Post
The greatest disadvantage to Slackware is the people who populate its forum.
Huh? Such as who? Don't be shy - name them.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 08:40 AM   #42
H_TeXMeX_H
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269
I don't see what his problem is. He's had a few heated arguments with a few members and now he hates everyone who populates this forum. I was going to try to say 'calm down man', but I don't think it'll work.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:36 PM   #43
business_kid
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware & Android
Posts: 6,624

Rep: Reputation: 585Reputation: 585Reputation: 585Reputation: 585Reputation: 585Reputation: 585
I'm new to salckware but not to unix.

The advantage I see is that is is just a unix system.

With other distros, You get megabytes of scripts providing everything other distros think you will need, and they are always wrong about that. Then you get regular (poorly tested) updates which can and have screwed up my box more than once. /usr/bin/vi is a symlink to /etc/vim-alternatives/something which eventually tries to run /usr/bin/Vim-iMproved :-\. Red Hat patches as it sees fit and documents these poorly. 15 scripts are run starting X with variables passed from one to the other, so it's a nightmare to follow.

Slackware has less of this, and expects you to be a little knowledgeable or clever. No package management, but 'cat /usr/lib/pkgconfig/sendmail*' gives you the dependencies of sendmail. 'grep spoof.h /var/log/packages/*' tells you which package installed spoof.h, etc. The result is, the system you set up lasts longer, causes less hassle. Which is just as well, because you won't feel like setting it up very often.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:57 PM   #44
raconteur
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: Slightly left of center
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 276
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 44
The advantages of Slackware for me are many and varied.

Flexibility: I've tailored it for use in embedded digital signage applications, forum servers, weather image servers, development platforms, prototyping systems, and hobby platforms using an amazingly diverse array of hardware.

Stability: this one is well-documented, I mention it only because I am so appreciative and impressed by the approach and attention to detail that Patrick and the rest of the team take on the issue.

Familiarity: I'm intimately familiar with and quite fond of the SVR4 directory structure, shells, and tools that are employed in the distribution. Though it is evolving, so am I (I hope).

I'm using Ubuntu to get my wife familiar with *nix, not so much to wean her from Windows but because she wants to use some of the tools she sees me using and has expressed an interest.

I won't subject her to the deep end of the pool until she has a better handle on the whole picture. I don't see that as an advantage for Ubuntu, its just another tool, good at what it does, as is Slackware.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 01:24 PM   #45
Melkor
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: MN
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 179

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
The result is, the system you set up lasts longer, causes less hassle. Which is just as well, because you won't feel like setting it up very often.
Thing is, I don't even mind setting it up most of the time.

I've had great luck with Slackware setups. I've run it on three different laptops and I don't even know how many desktops, and it remains simple and easy and intuitive to install, and worlds better at hardware support than any version of Windows I've set up.

Most of the time if something's hosed it's my own damned fault, not Slackware's. Like several times when I partitioned things in a stupid way, or when I've forgotten how to do something and end up telling it to do something wrong.

Most of the trauma that comes from setups for me is tweaking KDE to behave the way I like it, and installing the apps I prefer to have on-hand, again not normally something I can blame on Slackware. I'd be doing that on any distro.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linux kernel advantages/disadvantages over Solaris and Minix kernel Alien_Hominid Linux - General 6 05-15-2007 11:08 AM
advantages and disadvantages of nat prerouting / postrouting? Teomari Linux - Networking 2 04-13-2007 09:28 PM
Advantages and disadvantages of external drives General Linux - Hardware 2 06-11-2006 01:15 AM
Source vs Binary Disadvantages & Advantages of each! RobNyc Linux - General 1 03-18-2005 11:27 PM
Advantages and disadvantages of installing Gentoo GNU/Linux using Stage 1 blood_omen Linux - General 8 01-27-2005 09:37 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:48 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration