LinuxQuestions.org
Go Job Hunting at the LQ Job Marketplace
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-10-2009, 12:05 AM   #1
cwizardone
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: Slackware64-current & "True Multilib." PC-BSD.
Posts: 2,277

Rep: Reputation: 187Reputation: 187
A "Registry" in Linux? i Hope Not!


I just stumbled across this interesting quote:

"If anything will drive people to Linux, it will be this Registry-centric architecture of Windows. Linux does not use this concept, although some maniacs are promoting the idea for some unknown reason."

The whole article is here:
http://tech.yahoo.com/news/zd/20090804/tc_zd/242907

This wouldn't be similar to that nonsense we are seeing in KDE... can't remember what it is called... PolicyKit?

Last edited by cwizardone; 08-10-2009 at 12:19 AM.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 01:01 AM   #2
vinegaroon
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2008
Posts: 99

Rep: Reputation: 21
All I can think of is gconf in Gnome. That's registry-ish. Also from what I've seen DeviceKit should be better than hal.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 03:14 AM   #3
cathectic
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: UK, Europe
Distribution: Slackware64
Posts: 761

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
This wouldn't be similar to that nonsense we are seeing in KDE... can't remember what it is called... PolicyKit?
No, PolicyKit is something different. See the wikipedia article on it for a quick explanation.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 03:22 AM   #4
bonaire
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2008
Location: Bonn/Germany
Distribution: Slackware-13.37
Posts: 94

Rep: Reputation: 19
What is the problem? Don't like it, don't use it.
Kde has nothing to do with Linux, except it is running on it (like on *Bsd and Windows, too).
This flaming against Hal and DeviceKit/PolicyKit is annoying.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 09:40 AM   #5
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 11,478
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526
Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonaire View Post
What is the problem? Don't like it, don't use it.
Kde has nothing to do with Linux, except it is running on it (like on *Bsd and Windows, too).
This flaming against Hal and DeviceKit/PolicyKit is annoying.
I find that the debate is useful.

I'm sorry but 'KDE' is a useful environment for some to use for 'X' on a GNU/Linux distribution. I prefer 'XFCE' when a desktop is necessary but I am finding the new 'KDE' to be nice as long as the resources are available.

That's what's nice about GNU/Linux, one can tune or use pretty much what they wish to tweak to use on a 'Free' to use OS.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 10:01 AM   #6
GrapefruiTgirl
Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: underground
Distribution: Slackware64
Posts: 7,594

Rep: Reputation: 550Reputation: 550Reputation: 550Reputation: 550Reputation: 550Reputation: 550
Discussion is useful

Quote:
Originally Posted by bonaire View Post
What is the problem? Don't like it, don't use it.
And by the same token, if you don't like the discussion, don't read it
Quote:
Kde has nothing to do with Linux, except it is running on it (like on *Bsd and Windows, too).
This flaming against Hal and DeviceKit/PolicyKit is annoying.
IMHO the discussions about hal et al re: their worth are not 'flames' per se, but opinions and discussion.

 
Old 08-10-2009, 10:19 AM   #7
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,283

Rep: Reputation: 588Reputation: 588Reputation: 588Reputation: 588Reputation: 588Reputation: 588
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,


I find that the debate is useful.

I'm sorry but 'KDE' is a useful environment for some to use for 'X' on a GNU/Linux distribution. I prefer 'XFCE' when a desktop is necessary but I am finding the new 'KDE' to be nice as long as the resources are available.

That's what's nice about GNU/Linux, one can tune or use pretty much what they wish to tweak to use on a 'Free' to use OS.
I use both XFCE and KDE. I have the resources to run KDE 4.2.4 in -current and I like it a lot. Depending on what I'm doing in X I'll alternate between KDE and XFCE. I'm running XFCE 4.6.1 at the moment.
Agreed. This is what is wonderful about GNU/Linux; users have the freedom to choose how to use their machines.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 11:11 AM   #8
unSpawn
Moderator
 
Registered: May 2001
Posts: 27,813
Blog Entries: 54

Rep: Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989Reputation: 2989
"Elektra is a universal hierarchical configuration store, with related goals like GConf and the Windows Registry. It allows programs to read and save their configurations with a consistent API, and allows them to be aware of other applications' configurations, leveraging easy application integration. The whole point of it is to tie applications together, so that they can co-operate and share their user-preferences.

The developers are associated to unix philosophy and the very practical point consists of writing a configuration library. Every software needs this functionality, it is not easy to do it right and performant and we want to avoid any unnecessary code duplication."

(http://elektra.g4ii.com/Main_Page)
 
Old 08-10-2009, 11:53 AM   #9
/dev/me
Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Distribution: Slackware 13
Posts: 116

Rep: Reputation: 20
And then you need to change one little thing and ... ehm ... what? Where is it? regedit and gpedit top the chart of things that make my blood boil. They are also the two prime examples of why Redmonds 'user friendliness (whatever that is)' is a myth, but let's not go there.

No, the article makes a good point. Is the author the same Dvorak from the keyboard layout btw?
 
Old 08-10-2009, 12:03 PM   #10
w1k0
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: Poland
Distribution: Slackware, Mint
Posts: 1,244

Rep: Reputation: 203Reputation: 203Reputation: 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
"If anything will drive people to Linux, it will be this Registry-centric architecture of Windows. Linux does not use this concept, although some maniacs are promoting the idea for some unknown reason."
Very doubtful thesis. There are a lot of reasons driving people to Linux. A lot of free distributions for different purposes, a lot of free applications included in each distribution, a lot of free additional applications. Possibility of internationalization of the system and applications, comfortable tools for system maintenance, big set of tools for data processing, a lot of compilers and interpreters of different languages.

There is a big difference between Windows and Linux in the culture of the work with the computer, the system, and the applications. Windows comes with a handful of programs. You can't do almost nothing with Windows. Linux comes with a lot of programs. You can do almost anything with Linux. Windows programs are huge all in one sets of tools. Linux programs are tiny separate tools designed for strictly specified tasks. Windows programs are expensive executables -- you can only buy and use them. Linux programs are free sources -- you can modify them to your needs.

As Windows user you're client. As Linux user you're the member of the community. Windows does some tasks behind the scene. Linux does everything transparently. Windows updates come in bundled service packs. You don't know their exact contents. Linux patches come as separate packages. You're aware what and why you update.

Bill Gates wears small rounded spectacles. Linus Torvalds wears big round glasses.

To be continued...
 
Old 08-10-2009, 12:06 PM   #11
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 11,478
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526
Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by /dev/me View Post
<snip>
No, the article makes a good point. Is the author the same Dvorak from the keyboard layout btw?
Not unless August Dvorak has the ultimate means to link or the means to use his keyboard remotely?
 
Old 08-10-2009, 12:14 PM   #12
C-Sniper
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 507

Rep: Reputation: 33
While the ability for programs and applications to interact with one another would be nice; I think a registry is the wrong way to go about it. An example of this is the windows registry which is MASSIVE and a pain in the ass to use. Normally if a program needs to be self-aware of the dependencies or other programs about it then the developers will make sure it does so.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 02:07 PM   #13
dugan
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: distro hopper
Posts: 5,005

Rep: Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560Reputation: 1560
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
some maniacs are promoting the idea for some unknown reason
I have never encountered these maniacs.

Last edited by dugan; 08-10-2009 at 07:17 PM.
 
Old 08-10-2009, 03:25 PM   #14
dive
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,211

Rep: Reputation: 293Reputation: 293Reputation: 293
I prefer that programs save their data in their own text files. The biggest problem with the registry in Windows is that if an error of some sort occurs when writing to it, the entire registry can be corrupted. Using distinct and separate text files lessens this greatly I think.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Standard commands give "-bash: open: command not found" even in "su -" and "su root" mibo12 Linux - General 4 11-11-2007 11:18 PM
LXer: Displaying "MyComputer", "Trash", "Network Servers" Icons On A GNOME Desktop LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 04-02-2007 09:31 AM
Has Linux got "registry"? lucky6969b Programming 10 03-31-2006 12:01 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:46 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration