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Old 11-17-2009, 11:47 PM   #1
windtalker10
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A question for those experienced with C++


I got my 7 pound C++ book out finally, dusted it off and decided to try my hand at it.
I have a fresh basic install of 12.2 w/kde up to date to play on.
My question is, would the ide in kdevelop be the "easier/better" ide for someone who mainly will be depending on what they can find to read or would another ide be recommended?
I don't have any peers willing to take on an apprentice so I figure getting past the hurdle of an ide will be paramount.
Thx in advance.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 12:24 AM   #2
dugan
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I haven't used KDevelop, but I think Code::Blocks would meet your needs perfectly.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 12:27 AM   #3
tuxdev
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I don't use an IDE for my C++ programming, just vim. I find it a lot nicer to 1. use a decent text editor (my productivity is like 10x from using vim) and 2. fully understand how my source ends up as an executable. Of course, the latter is a gradual process and I haven't totally accomplished it either.

I've heard good things about using Eclipse for C++. There's actually a decent Vim editor plugin for eclipse now! (vrapper)
 
Old 11-18-2009, 12:52 AM   #4
escaflown
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Vim is great. For maximum efficiency with vim usage in C++, consider installing "exuberant ctags", and the plugins "cvim", "taglist", "project", and "NERDtree". They really turn vim into a full C/C++ IDE.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 01:04 AM   #5
windtalker10
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Thx for the replies so far and I'll check em out.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 09:08 AM   #6
sahko
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Quote:
Originally Posted by escaflown View Post
For maximum efficiency with vim usage in C++, consider installing "exuberant ctags"
Ctags come with Vim by default in Slackware.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 09:24 AM   #7
Komakino
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I used to just use vim until I tried KDevelop. KDevelop is very nice, not difficult to use and has things like code folding, syntax highlighting, class listing, etc. But... they're all free, so why not get them all, give them a go and see which you prefer?
 
Old 11-18-2009, 10:00 AM   #8
daniil
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I use netbeans. As IDE's functionality is great, it is written in java so performance is poor but acceptable.

www.netbeans.org
 
Old 11-18-2009, 12:51 PM   #9
Michael_S
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Even if you're going to work in an IDE eventually, I recommend starting out with just a text editor and command line work. An IDE insulates you from a lot of the work that occurs, and while that's fine for productivity it's not as good for understanding how and why things work.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 12:55 PM   #10
windtalker10
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Quote:
they're all free, so why not get them all, give them a go and see which you prefer?
I've done just that.
Thx all, appreciate the suggestions.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 02:06 PM   #11
astrogeek
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I agree totally!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_S View Post
Even if you're going to work in an IDE eventually, I recommend starting out with just a text editor and command line work. An IDE insulates you from a lot of the work that occurs, and while that's fine for productivity it's not as good for understanding how and why things work.
The difference is this:

If you learn using a text editor like Vi, and manage your files and directory structure yourself through a terminal, you will learn the C++ language and the 'why'. Then, when you learn the IDE you will understand what features the IDE provides and why they are useful.

On the other hand, if you try to learn the C++ language through an IDE, you will never clearly see what ideas and operations are part of the language and what are IDE features intended to simplify code generation and file management.

Just remember, the language is one thing, and the IDE is something else entirely. Learn the difference.

Good luck!

Last edited by astrogeek; 11-18-2009 at 02:07 PM.
 
Old 11-18-2009, 02:30 PM   #12
Ivshti
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I recommend Code::Blocks. It's pretty simple and functional...
 
Old 11-18-2009, 05:05 PM   #13
windtalker10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_S View Post
Even if you're going to work in an IDE eventually, I recommend starting out with just a text editor and command line work. An IDE insulates you from a lot of the work that occurs, and while that's fine for productivity it's not as good for understanding how and why things work.
I've already came to that same conclusion myself.
If I can't comprehend the how and why of something, it's a waste of my time to attempt to even learn it.
I have the ide's installed for the future, but I think I'll stick with an editor and the cli until things make sense to me.
Appreciate the input everyone made.
 
  


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