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Old 07-06-2014, 07:24 PM   #16
metaschima
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odiseo77 View Post
I guess good quality bikes use good seats, but you might want to make sure it's comfortable if you'll be taking long rides (about one hour) daily. Bad quality seats may cause a very undesirable side effect (search "biking and ed" for details ).

Cheers!
I agree that you should choose a good bike seat. Personally, I also stand up on the bike pedals once in a while, which helps.

I've found better bike seats to have a slight concave shape, and worse ones to have a convex shape. Make sure to adjust the angle of the bike seat so that it is comfortable. I angle mine slightly forward so that pressure is shifted backwards rather than being right in the center where it can compress the blood vessels easily.

Last edited by metaschima; 07-06-2014 at 07:26 PM.
 
Old 07-08-2014, 06:02 PM   #17
Sumguy
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Sycamore,

A few random thoughts from a road bike enthusiast!

A)If you haven't ridden much, and don't know much about bikes, the bike you buy now will not be the one you keep forever. I recommend getting a good quality used bike. It will be cheaper and of better quality; when you're ready to sell it, you can likely get all of your money back out of it; and it'll be a good starting point to get a little experience on both maintenance, and in finding out what you like/want/need in a bike. I'm an avid rider, and I ride a vintage Klein which I bought on Craigslist!

B)Carbon forks are A-OK. I don't like full-carbon bikes- they are expensive, and can be delicate- but carbon forks have been around a long time now, and even I don't worry about them (My aluminum Klein has a carbon fork). They not only save some weight, but they make the ride much more comfortable.

C) You DON'T want any kind of suspension on a road bike (i.e. you don't want a rear shock- or shock of any kind). No real road bike has that. It'll rob you of power/efficiency. You want a stiff bike. (A stiff bike can still ride very nicely- depending on the geometry and how/what it's made of).

D)Old steel bikes can be very comfy- if you come across any, check with someone to make sure it is of high quality, and is light- and you could have a really nice bike, cheap.

E)The lowest level of shifter will shift almost as nicely as the most expensive, as long as it's adjusted properly (All bikes- no matter what they cost, require some readjustment during the break-in period). I have Shimano Dura-Ace on my Klein (one of the best) and Shimano Sora (one of the cheapest) on my other beater bike. Except for aesthetics, I can't really tell them apart. They both shift perfectly- which is funny, because the Dura-Ace shifters on my Klein are worth as much as my entire other bike

F)Have fun! Enjoy the health benefits of riding! Don't take things too seriously. Cyclists tend to obsess over equipment- but in the long-run, there's really very little difference between the best and the worst. You don't want some 35 lb. department-store bike made of hi-tensile steel, with shifters that need to be adjusted every day, and brakes that don't stop...but once you get into "real bikes" the differences aren't that great.

There are people out there who spend thousands and thousands of dollars (err...Pounds...) to save a few ounces in weight- and while it is nioce to have a light nimble bike, commuting, you will notice virtually no difference between a 15 lb. wonderbike ($10K+) and a 19 or 20 lb. used aluminum bike. (Just don't get a bike with an aluminum fork...it'll rattle your brains out!)
 
Old 07-08-2014, 06:16 PM   #18
metaschima
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
C) You DON'T want any kind of suspension on a road bike (i.e. you don't want a rear shock- or shock of any kind). No real road bike has that. It'll rob you of power/efficiency. You want a stiff bike. (A stiff bike can still ride very nicely- depending on the geometry and how/what it's made of).

...

F)Have fun! Enjoy the health benefits of riding! Don't take things too seriously. Cyclists tend to obsess over equipment- but in the long-run, there's really very little difference between the best and the worst. You don't want some 35 lb. department-store bike made of hi-tensile steel, with shifters that need to be adjusted every day, and brakes that don't stop...but once you get into "real bikes" the differences aren't that great.
You can lock the shocks on all bikes I have had if you really care that much about efficiency. If you are biking for the health benefits it doesn't matter about efficiency, in fact you may lose more weight with a shock. Whatever, it is your choice. I've ridden both and will never ride without a shock again.
 
Old 07-08-2014, 07:03 PM   #19
sycamorex
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Thanks everyone. Due to some availability/size/other reasons, I decided to go for another bike and had to spend slightly more money and bought a Whyte Sussex 14

http://www.cyclesurgery.com/whyte%20...-product/52455

I'm loving it... every minute of my way to work and back. It's mostly a flat road with low traffic (I do wear a helmet, though). The bike is so light...and quick.
 
Old 07-08-2014, 08:24 PM   #20
Sumguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metaschima View Post
If you are biking for the health benefits it doesn't matter about efficiency, in fact you may lose more weight with a shock. Whatever, it is your choice.
True. For that matter though, some 40 lb ancient Schwinn would do, too!

But people won't lose any weight if they don't ride their bikes; and for many of us, the feel of a road bike, and being able to glide nimbly through the streets at a good speed, is what makes us ride. I know from experience. My first ride on a rented road bike is what got me into cycling as an adult. I made the mistake of buying a mountain bike for mostly street riding, when I was young...and that experience turned me off of cycling for many years. I didn't realize it was the mountain bike and it's big knobby tires with lots of rolling resistance, which was hindering my enjoyment and making me slow, and making the bike feel like a Greyhound bus on the streets. I thought it was me, getting older.

Ah well, looks like the OP got himself a nice bike, so this story has a happy ending...or should I say "beginning"?!
 
Old 07-09-2014, 01:43 AM   #21
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
I'm loving it... every minute of my way to work and back.
You go to your office on a "cycle"?
There is a great cultural difference then! In my part of the
world the only people who may go to office on cycles
are either labourers or teenagers working as trainees.

In my part of the world, as the age OR/AND the post grows
your commuting vehicle is supposed to grow with that.

My 37 year old brother holds a high position in the
company. His lives nearby his company but still chooses
to go to the company in a big car, daily. He says because
of his post if he goes to office on a motor cycle he'll be
ridiculed by everyone and be termed a miser or a crazy
fellow.

I wished to ride a cycle myself for fun and leisure and for
grocery shopping, but then my father termed me crazy.
He was worried that people will laugh on seeing a 30 year
old woman riding a cycle!

I am not from any western country.
 
Old 07-09-2014, 02:03 AM   #22
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheIndependentAquarius View Post
You go to your office on a "cycle"?
There is a great cultural difference then! In my part of the
world the only people who may go to office on cycles
are either labourers or teenagers working as trainees.

In my part of the world, as the age OR/AND the post grows
your commuting vehicle is supposed to grow with that.

My 37 year old brother holds a high position in the
company. His lives nearby his company but still chooses
to go to the company in a big car, daily. He says because
of his post if he goes to office on a motor cycle he'll be
ridiculed by everyone and be termed a miser or a crazy
fellow.

I wished to ride a cycle myself for fun and leisure and for
grocery shopping, but then my father termed me crazy.
He was worried that people will laugh on seeing a 30 year
old woman riding a cycle!

I am not from any western country.

No, here it does not matter. Actually, the government gives a lot of incentives to employers/employees to start using bicycles to commute to work. You can see a lot of employees of financial institutions commuting to work on bikes but I doubt many of the very 'top' people do it. Having said that, the mayor of London, Boris Johnson, introduced a bike scheme a few years ago and very often is seen cycling to work himself.
 
Old 07-09-2014, 02:40 AM   #23
Germany_chris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
Thanks everyone. Due to some availability/size/other reasons, I decided to go for another bike and had to spend slightly more money and bought a Whyte Sussex 14

http://www.cyclesurgery.com/whyte%20...-product/52455

I'm loving it... every minute of my way to work and back. It's mostly a flat road with low traffic (I do wear a helmet, though). The bike is so light...and quick.

Much better choice than the original two.

=====

There is so much nonsense in this thread it's kinda scary.
 
Old 07-09-2014, 08:48 AM   #24
Sumguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheIndependentAquarius View Post
I wished to ride a cycle myself for fun and leisure and for
grocery shopping, but then my father termed me crazy.
He was worried that people will laugh on seeing a 30 year
old woman riding a cycle!

I am not from any western country.
Why would you let other people's opinion keep you from doing something that you would enjoy?

In the part of the US where I now live, I'm the only person who rides. In many places in the US, adults riding bicycles are assumed to be people who lost their driver's license due to drunk driving. I get a lot of enjoyment and health benefits from riding my bike on these country roads...I wouldn't give those up because of what some strangers may think of me.

In some places, like The Netherlands, everyone rides bikes! (To work; to shop; etc.)
 
Old 07-13-2014, 10:22 AM   #25
jmccue
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Since you indicate you live in the UK, I would look to see if the bikes you are looking can mount fenders (mudguards). From what I have heard, it can rain quite a bit in the UK being splashed with 'clean' water from above and dirty water from below is no fun The fenders would also protect the frame from road grime when raining.

Outside of that they see fairly similar to me

John
 
Old 07-13-2014, 02:21 PM   #26
RandomTroll
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I get good advice at http://www.BikeForums.net
 
  


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