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Old 10-05-2003, 08:42 AM   #1
tacobill
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Kernel too big to fit on floppy boot disk


(This happened in the JAMD 0.0.6 install, but since it is supposed to be like RH, I'm asking here.... might not be the right place, sorry.)

To keep from modifying the MBR on my /dev/hda, I chose to not load any boot loader (either GRUB or LILO). Naturally, I was hoping to then create a boot floppy later in the Install procedure.

At that point, I placed a floppy in the drive and got an Error message, saying the Kernel was too big to fit on my diskette and NO floppy would be made. Since there is NO backing up in the Install procedure.... I had just loaded the entire system --but had no way to boot it up. (I tried it a second time, just to make sure the first wasn't a fluke, and had the same result.) Darn! The floppy I used was a formatted 1.44 Mb HD.

Some questions come to mind..... 1.) Are there any files on the CD that could be manually copied to a floppy, such that I could then boot with it? 2.) Is there any way that I can boot up an installed system from my Install CD? 3.) Is there a way to copy the necessary files to a CD, and make a Bootup CD?

At this point, the /dev/hdb contains a Linux distro, but I have no way to boot it.
 
Old 10-05-2003, 10:21 AM   #2
usernamenumber
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There are a few things you could try. One option is to boot off of your CD and manually pass a kernel parameter that tells your system where to look:

linux root=/dev/hdb1

...assuming that hdb1 is your root partition. If the modules on your system don't match the kernel on the boot CD, you may get a bunch of horrible looking messages, but we can try and deal with that if it actually happens.

The Linux kernel has indeed finally reached the point where it probably won't fit on a floppy anymore. Why do you not want to mess with the MBR? If you can make whatever's already in there see Linux or make grub see whatever else you're booting, I'd highly recommend just using a bootloader. If you really can't do that, you have a couple of options:

1) Keep manually typing in a root= parameter (see 'man 7 bootparam' for more info on kernel args)

2) Set up grub on a partition instead of the mbr and let whatever is currently in the mbr hand off to grub when you want to boot Linux

There may be other options, like a custom bootable CD, but nothing really comes to mind right now.
 
Old 10-05-2003, 11:04 AM   #3
tacobill
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Quote:
Originally posted by usernamenumber
There are a few things you could try. One option is to boot off of your CD and manually pass a kernel parameter that tells your system where to look:

linux root=/dev/hdb1

...assuming that hdb1 is your root partition.
The only CD I have is the one JAMD Installation CD. I booted off of it, and at the very first "boot:" prompt, I entered linux root=/dev/hdb1 (yes, that's where the root is located)

The program must've ignored that command, because it went right into JAMD install routine.

I'm very reluctant to type anything but "advanced" at that first prompt because there are 3 total options and the first two are VERY DANGEROUS, and will wipe the entire system clean.

After the install screen came up, I re-booted immediately.

Quote:
The Linux kernel has indeed finally reached the point where it probably won't fit on a floppy anymore.
Then why does JAMD and Red Hat leave the option of making a floppy boot disk in their install procedure? (rhetorical) This is very misleading to say the least.

While I'm on the subject.... Even worse than leaving the option in the install procedure, when it obviously can't work, the worst part is, they go ahead and let you waste 15-30 minutes of time, installing all the packages, and THEN prompt you to put a floppy disk in the drive, which of course is destined to FAIL, --leaving you with a completed install of hundreds of modules and NO way to boot it up. What's wrong with this picture?

Quote:
Why do you not want to mess with the MBR?
Because I utilize my computer as a working tool. I can't afford to mess up the "working" OS, which is located on a separate HD. To the best of my knowledge GRUB (or LILO) wants to overwrite the MBR on the C: drive. I've never seen an option to write it anywhere else.

Looking at and evaluating Linux, is all I set out to do. I'm also not looking for another hobby ---where I spend all my free time fixin' and fussin' with Linux. I just wanted to look at it and see what I thought. After spending a little over a month, and trying to get 5 different distros installed and/or working ---I think I've learned what I set out to learn.

Looks like all I've done is add another coaster to my set. I must be up to 10 now. Bummer!

Thanks for the response... at least you tried.
 
Old 10-06-2003, 10:57 AM   #4
usernamenumber
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Quote:
Originally posted by tacobill
Then why does JAMD and Red Hat leave the option of making a floppy boot disk in their install procedure? (rhetorical) This is very misleading to say the least.
Sorry, I should have been more clear -- In the next release of Red Hat (at least Red Hat Enterprise Linux), the kernel will be too big to boot off of a floppy. In Red Hat 9, it will work just fine. I have never heard of JAMD, but for what it's worth, you should be able to make a boot floppy just fine using rh9. Sorry for the confusion.

Quote:
Because I utilize my computer as a working tool. I can't afford to mess up the "working" OS, which is located on a separate HD. To the best of my knowledge GRUB (or LILO) wants to overwrite the MBR on the C: drive. I've never seen an option to write it anywhere else.
Once again, I don't know anything about JAMD (except to assume from what you're saying that it's an RH variant) but during an rh9 install, on the grub screen, click on the 'advanced bootloader options', I believe, and there should be an option to install to a partition instead of to the MBR. You can also just look into ways of setting your other bootloader up to boot a Linux install. If your other OS is Windows, this is possible by modifying boot.ini.

Quote:
Looking at and evaluating Linux, is all I set out to do. I'm also not looking for another hobby ---where I spend all my free time fixin' and fussin' with Linux. I just wanted to look at it and see what I thought. After spending a little over a month, and trying to get 5 different distros installed and/or working ---I think I've learned what I set out to learn.
It can be frustrating, but to be fair, how much luck would you have installing Windows in a way that doesn't interfere in any way with an existing OS/mbr? It _is_ possible to do what you're trying to do, though maybe not with JAMD.

I'm remembering back in the day I booted my slackware system off of a floppy that contained LILO (then the default Linux bootloader) a quick bit of googling revealed this:

http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/Lin...Disk.html#GRUB

...which looks to be exactly what you need: a configured grub bootloader on a floppy. So your options are

a) Boot into rescue mode, chroot to /mnt/sysimage (or wherever JAMD puts your system) and follow the instructions on that page.

OR

b) Install RedHat 9 and let it make a boot floppy that should indeed fit. Then don't have it install a bootloader.

Good luck.
 
Old 10-07-2003, 03:17 AM   #5
osiris777
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this problem seems to be the exact same reason i joined this forum.
i installed redhat 9 to a seperate harddrive so it wouldnt screw with windows and didnt install a boot loader, i just created a disc for it to load from, it all worked fine until recently my floppy disc stuffed up, now i have no way of booting up linux.
ive read the manuals and they all seem to say that i can create a new one but only while booted up to linux.
i think ive figured that i need the kernal version (whatever that is) to create a new one but i, like the guy above, have no way of knowing how to get it, i cant see my linux hardrive from windows so is the only option a complete reinstall ?
any answers in complete and plain english rather than "linux talk" would be the best ones thanks...hehe
 
Old 10-07-2003, 08:23 AM   #6
usernamenumber
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Red Hat (and many other distros) provide a "rescue mode", which will allow you to boot into a self-contained linux environment right off the CD. From there you can do whatever you need to do to get your system running again.

osiris777, here's what you would need to do for your situation:

1) Boot off of CD1 of your Red Hat set
2) At the "boot: " prompt, type "linux rescue"
3) Answer any questions it may ask about language and whatnot.
4) Choose "continue" when it asks about mounting drives
5) When you get a prompt, type "chroot /mnt/sysimage"
6) Insert a floppy and type "mkbootdisk"

That should create a boot disk tailored to your system.
 
Old 10-07-2003, 08:36 AM   #7
osiris777
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wow, thanks man, that seems like a pretty straight forward solution, hope it works just as easy...lol
 
Old 03-03-2004, 04:03 AM   #8
Razgo
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Quote:
Originally posted by usernamenumber
Red Hat (and many other distros) provide a "rescue mode", which will allow you to boot into a self-contained linux environment right off the CD. From there you can do whatever you need to do to get your system running again.

osiris777, here's what you would need to do for your situation:

1) Boot off of CD1 of your Red Hat set
2) At the "boot: " prompt, type "linux rescue"
3) Answer any questions it may ask about language and whatnot.
4) Choose "continue" when it asks about mounting drives
5) When you get a prompt, type "chroot /mnt/sysimage"
6) Insert a floppy and type "mkbootdisk"

That should create a boot disk tailored to your system.
i have been searching for an easy solution for creating a boot disk. this came the closest. except when i typed in "mkbootdisk" it said no such file or directory. so the solution failed right there.

also i am running rhel3 so i don't think it will create a boot floppy as it's not enough room?

anyhow is there an easy solution to create a cd boot disk for my system?
 
Old 03-04-2004, 12:53 AM   #9
legend1079
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can u tell me when u boot from
RH 9.0 installation cd what options appers
 
Old 03-04-2004, 03:18 AM   #10
Razgo
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i am running rhel3. what options do i need to look for?
 
Old 03-07-2004, 12:12 AM   #11
Razgo
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ok i have found some instructions here: easy boot disk
however now my problem is when i type in mkbootdisk i get "command not found"

any solutions?
 
Old 03-07-2004, 12:21 AM   #12
Razgo
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well i fumbled a bit more and found this site: http://home.worldonline.co.za/~jctre...sicadvice.html

i read this part "I found that some things had moved to /sbin in RH7.1, and this isn't in the path - so I made a symlink to somewhere that was in my path. eg. mkbootdisk had moved! I found it in /sbin. Now it works fine.

ln -s /sbin/mkbootdisk /usr/bin/mkbootdisk "

so at the command promt i typed "ln -s /sbin/mkbootdisk /usr/bin/mkbootdisk"
and now i have mkbootdisk working. and now i have made a boot floppy!!

off to reboot to see if it works now.
 
  


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