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View Poll Results: Do you use the GUI or a VT to write source code?
I use a GUI. 18 58.06%
I use a VT. 13 41.94%
Voters: 31. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-12-2011, 09:15 PM   #31
ta0kira
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I almost exclusively use kate with an embedded terminal emulator and konsole on a separate desktop with several tabs open (at least one for manpages and one for running the code), and maybe konqueror on another desktop with infopages. I don't use the "programming" features of kate other than highlighting and auto comment/uncomment, but I use a lot of the non-programming features such as:
  • Quick document switching.
  • Regex replacement (regex find has been removed for what I presume is a pathetic reason).
  • Text filtering through shell commands.
  • Undo/redo/cut/copy/paste from the keyboard (admittedly not at all unique, but at least the hotkeys are normative, unlike in MATLAB's editor).
  • Persistent sessions and quick session switching (and incidentally having multiple documents available in the same instance).
All of these features are available elsewhere, but I use KDE, and kate comes with it. I strongly dislike IDEs unless I'm writing something for Qt. I also use pico or ee for quick stuff, like minor fixes or snippets I post to LQ. I haven't learned vi or emacs because intensive keyboard-only editing of huge projects would give me wicked insomnia, and minor editing isn't enough of an incentive.

As far as variable vs. fixed width, I normally associate variable-width font with applications that aren't aware that a file needs to stay plain text. It's like accidentally opening a source file in a word-processing application. I honestly have trouble comprehending the structure of code if the font isn't fixed, but that's probably because I cringe and Alt+F4 the second I see source in variable-width font. I don't think there would be as many "use [CODE][/CODE] tags!" complaints in this forum if posts had fixed-width font (aside from the dynamic word wrap).

As far as the poll, I'm refusing to answer because I don't think this dichotomy applies to very many *nix programmers. I think the options would be more suitable for a poll about sysadmin. I seem to remember some sort of IDE vs. no-IDE poll a while ago.
Kevin Barry

Last edited by ta0kira; 08-12-2011 at 09:19 PM.
 
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Old 08-12-2011, 09:23 PM   #32
ta0kira
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theNbomr View Post
I almost never use an IDE, although I've tried to convince myself that Eclipse can be worthwhile.
I did the same thing, but I got tired of forgetting to resync my documents after quick-fixes in "other" editors. My loathing of automation is half the reason I use Linux.
Kevin Barry
 
Old 08-12-2011, 10:44 PM   #33
stf92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
Variable-width is more "book-like" so if you read a lot, that would make code easier to
read.(IMO).
That's the whole point. The screen should NOT be book-like.

And right now, I'm writing with a "typewriter" type font set, which places a strain in the eye, which already are receiving about 40 watts of power from the white background.

Now, you can say: all this seteable in LQ and in your DE or browser. Well, for maximum contrast, you need white on black or black on white. Which leave us with two options. But why do you think the cinematographic industry chose white on black for the credits? The question answers itself. Therefore, white letters on a black background, is the only reasonable choice.

OK, you'll say. But I can do the same in the GUI. True, but the legibility won't be the same as in a text console. I don't know why but it is so.
 
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Old 08-13-2011, 03:33 AM   #34
Sergei Steshenko
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I prefer 'nedit' and rarely use 'nano'.
 
Old 08-13-2011, 03:36 AM   #35
SigTerm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stf92 View Post
That's the whole point. The screen should NOT be book-like.
And THAT is your personal opinion. If you're a fast reader, there's no reason to make screen look different compared to book.

Anyway, (IMO) the best approach with fonts is "if it works for you, don't change anything".

Quote:
Originally Posted by stf92 View Post
Well, for maximum contrast, you need white on black or black on white.
IMO, maximum contrast will strain your eyes. If you insist on black background, the better idea would be to use dark green on black or gray on black. Plus, there's no real "black" with LCD monitor anyway (AFAIK you'll need CRT or plasma).

Anyway, if you already know what works the best for you, why the hell did you ask for opinions? "GUI vs CLI" or "proportional vs monospace" is flameware fuel with no "correct" answer.

Last edited by SigTerm; 08-13-2011 at 03:52 AM.
 
Old 08-13-2011, 04:26 AM   #36
Proud
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
That's matter of taste. I HATE font antialiasing - it nearly makes me feel nauseous, so I prefer fonts to be crisp.
I hate bad font antialiasing, with artifacts such as vertical characters components losing half of their thickness or becoming blurred which I've noticed far more in Windows, and it's ClearType can make text appear as a horrid rainbow mess on certain screens. By where there's a decent implementation, smoothed curves are just plain easier to read, as I'm sure all learnt their glyphs from a natural, smooth depiction, rather than one using a rather granular grid of pixels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
I'm not sure that I should discuss usage of proportional fonts in C++ with you. C++ is NOT java, C#, PHP, or JS.
I'm not claiming that it is, but I'm not recalling how it differs syntactically from other imperative languages in a way that lessens the impact of font spacing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
elastic tabs
Thank you for describing exactly what you meant, this is was I was suggesting by '4space tabs aligning things'.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
block selection
If you haven't needed it much, I'm not surprised you don't consider it a loss.

As for being a 'fast reader', IMHO we're not trying to read the words within a line fast, rather trying to notice any syntactical errors, or mixed-up variable names.
Assuming we don't have the benefit of syntax highlighting, aren't the following differences easier to spot in monospacing? Note I've also increased the font size of the variable-width example to IMHO help it's readability.

objlll.someMethod( arg3 );
objZZZ.someMethod( arg2 );
obj111.someMethod( arg1 );

objlll.someMethod( arg3 );
objZZZ.someMethod( arg2 );
obj111.someMethod( arg1 );


case 'a':
case 'i':
case 'A'
case '1':

case 'a':
case 'i':
case 'A'
case '1':


I think those examples make it clear enough, unless we're seeing different things. The obj and args pieces are easier to visually compare with monospacing. The missing : after the A is obvious with monospaced and obscured by variable-width.

ta0kira, I see what you did there

konsolebox, I suggest SciTE or that you check out one of the tens of other sibling editors, at least one should have all the features you desire and avoid the need for Wine.

Last edited by Proud; 08-13-2011 at 04:32 AM.
 
Old 08-13-2011, 04:45 AM   #37
Nylex
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I use Emacs exclusively. If I'm editing code locally, I use the GUI version and if I'm doing it remotely, I use the terminal version. In both cases, I start Emacs from the command line.
 
Old 08-13-2011, 04:49 AM   #38
konsolebox
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@Proud: no thanks i think i'm cool with notepad++ in wine ^__^
 
Old 08-13-2011, 05:05 AM   #39
SigTerm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proud View Post
By where there's a decent implementation, smoothed curves are just plain easier to read, as I'm sure all learnt their glyphs from a natural, smooth depiction, rather than one using a rather granular grid of pixels.
I don't need that. Antialiasing is useful only if you're going to rotate text (by 5,15 degrees) for small horizontal font it is unnecessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Proud View Post
Assuming we don't have the benefit of syntax highlighting, aren't the following differences easier to spot in monospacing? Note I've also increased the font size of the variable-width example to IMHO help it's readability.
With your example difference between obj111 and objlll is instantly obvious with proportional font, and is not instantly obvious with monospaced. Also, I don't see a reason to insert space between bracket and variables. (IMO) Space is only absolutely necessarry after comma or semicolon.

I'm not sure what this example was supposed to illustrate:
Quote:
case 'a':
case 'i':
case 'A'
case '1':

case 'a':
case 'i':
case 'A'
case '1':
Yes, you can't align colons without elastic tabs, but aside from that I'm not sure where I'm supposed to see the problem.
switch/case blocks are normally paired with breaks ("break" has extra ident/tab) or curly brackets which makes them very easy to spot, and I don't feel the need to align case arguments so they form a column.

I have nothing else to say.
 
Old 09-06-2011, 04:04 PM   #40
Shay
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VT

A Vim user doesn't have a choice unless he can stomach a whole lot of ugly. Yes, Win 3.0 style menus and scrollbars can be removed from gvim, but you'll never be able to maximize (much less fullscreen, which is a whole other issue) gvim without seeing permanently attached gray bars on the top and right sides of the window.

Anyway, with a modern terminal, you can still 'click' between and resize panes and 'click' to select tabs. I'll occasionally do that on my desktop. On my laptop (sh!tty thumb mouse thing), I won't even bother.
 
Old 09-16-2011, 02:12 AM   #41
tc_
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vim again

I use vim in virtual terminal for all my programming needs: c/c++, python, latex and some shell scripts. I randomly tried IDEs but never felt quite comfortable. My font of choice is Terminus, which is -- apart from missing unicode characters -- really nice. My two cents.
 
Old 09-30-2011, 12:40 PM   #42
allanf
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I checked "GUI" because I prefer xterm, gvim, etc. When I have to I use VT and vim (or vim in an xterm.)
 
  


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