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Old 02-20-2012, 02:25 PM   #1
Geek255
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What programming languages are easy for beginners


Hi,

I am thinking of learning programming for personal enrichment.

I know bash scripting but I want add another program language to my geek knowledge.

I appreciate any feedback.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 02:33 PM   #2
uhelp
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I would recommend python.
An elegant easy syntax, "batteries included" which means there is for each and everything a module already done.
Writing a functional TCPserver is just about 10 lines using framework twister for instance.
It exists for a long time and is therefor stable.
You can write cross platform, as python is available on nearly every OS
And there are bindings for a lot of C libs.
In fact oneself can easily bind C or C++ libs.
With all that said, it is clear, that you can write GUIs for all major GUI Systems as well.

Some of the language constructs are so highly developed that they are faster, than coded in C.

Last edited by uhelp; 02-20-2012 at 02:34 PM.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 02:39 PM   #3
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thanks uhelp

Can python have linux commands or execute linux programs from the python script like bach scripting does?
 
Old 02-20-2012, 02:41 PM   #4
uhelp
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yes, it can.
Including process management and whatever you might come across.

But if you learned it for a little while, you will prefer writing them in python on your own.

Python is already installed at your machine.
And here is a free online book you can start with.

Last edited by uhelp; 02-20-2012 at 02:46 PM.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 02:45 PM   #5
Geek255
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Thanks again uhelp. Your comments were helpful and added +1 rep for you.

the link above is a foreign language.

Last edited by Geek255; 02-20-2012 at 02:49 PM.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 02:50 PM   #6
dugan
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Python is a good recommendation.

Here's a fun set of tutorials for another one:
http://cdsmith.wordpress.com/2011/08...r-kids-week-1/

Last edited by dugan; 02-20-2012 at 02:54 PM.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 03:09 PM   #7
uhelp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geek255 View Post
the link above is a foreign language.
Sorry. I didn't even think about that.
I don't even know what i am reading in German or English when it comes to computer books.
In fact it is a German publisher....

But there are loads of tutorials out there.
Check python.org

And thanks for reputation point.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 03:45 PM   #8
Geek255
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
Python is a good recommendation.

Here's a fun set of tutorials for another one:
http://cdsmith.wordpress.com/2011/08...r-kids-week-1/

Never heard of Haskell. Actually, I was seeking advice on these common languages like python, perl, ruby, java, c/c++ and wanted to know which one of these is the easiest to learn. Thanks for the link though

Last edited by Geek255; 02-20-2012 at 03:46 PM.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 04:04 PM   #9
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All programming languages seem easy once you practice a little and succeed to acheive what you want to do

The complexity comes from the application imho
 
Old 02-20-2012, 04:11 PM   #10
uhelp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cedrik View Post
All programming languages seem easy once you practice a little and succeed to acheive what you want to do

The complexity comes from the application imho
You are right.
If you practice.

Nevertheless learning C or C++ takes much more longer, than python.

Python honors learning by fast and astonishing results.
 
Old 02-20-2012, 04:12 PM   #11
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Another vote for Python.

Here's free online book for beginners: http://learnpythonthehardway.org/
 
Old 02-20-2012, 04:55 PM   #12
Geek255
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audriusk View Post
Another vote for Python.

Here's free online book for beginners: http://learnpythonthehardway.org/
Thanks
 
Old 02-21-2012, 03:59 AM   #13
cin_
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Bash

From absolutely no experience to a bit of know how I recommend this tutorial:

http://linuxconfig.org/Bash_scripting_Tutorial

It is fantastic for beginners.

(i) Just copy the code your first run through. Do not worry about retention.
(ii) Then go back a second time and try to do what you can from memory.What you can't remember, do again.
(iii) Then go back a third time and riff on the questions and answers. Change the variables, the questions, the outputs.

From these 18 problems you will have the know how to be able to begin tackling any language.


Bash is a command-line interpreter, or scripting language, for the Linux shell, and so covers the elementary attributes of programming while also introducing you to your Linux shell a bit more.

I agree with the above: Python is an excellent next step.


All languages are basically the same. Their application, execution, and syntax differ. So learning these is the real goal.
Much like verbal language. We all use verbs, nouns, tense and the like, though some use them differently: gender, participles, gerunds.
Programming is the same. All languages use logic in the form of if statements, loops, and input output calls.

Complexity of the program can remain the same, but the complexity of the Syntax grows down dramatically.

A simplified hierarchy of helpful terminology:
High level:
Interpreter
Python
Code:
#!/usr/bin/env python3
w="World"
print("Hello,",w)
Low level:
Compiled
C
Code:
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
char *w; 
w="World"; 
printf("Hello, %s\n",w);
return 0;
}
Machine Code:
Assembly
Unix Assembly
Code:
section	.text
    global _start			

_start:					

	mov	edx,len	
	mov	ecx,msg	
	mov	ebx,1	
	mov	eax,4	
	int	0x80	

	mov	eax,1	
	int	0x80	

section	.data

msg	db	'Hello, world!',0xa	
len	equ	$ - msg

Last edited by cin_; 02-21-2012 at 04:09 AM. Reason: gramm`err
 
Old 02-21-2012, 04:41 AM   #14
catkin
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@Geek255: do you only want the language to be easy to learn or are you also interested in how useful it would be to know afterwards, availability of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), areas of applicability ... ?

If it's only "easy to learn" then DOS .BAT would be a primary candidate because the language is so small and simple.
 
Old 02-21-2012, 06:56 AM   #15
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geek255 View Post
I want add another program language to my geek knowledge.
May I ask you to list out the TYPES of softwares that you would love to
build?
 
  


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