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Zssfssz 03-02-2012 08:19 PM

What is the hardest part of porting a application to windows?
 
I am assuming that the app uses/has the following things:
Uses ether no GUI or uses a Cross-Platform one
Isn't An Interpeted Or Arch-Independant Languige (Python, Java)
Doesn't Have Anything That Would upset The Normal-GCC to MinGW Divide.

If The Above Requirements Are Met, What Would Be Needed To Port It To Windows?

ceyx 03-02-2012 10:27 PM

Q. What is the hardest part of porting a application to windows?

A. Using windows

cin_ 03-03-2012 03:17 AM

Never Tried It
 
Never tried it, but if I were to venture a guess... I'd say the libraries, and subsequently every single library function in the code.

Very `standard' example: libc and glibc.

dugan 03-03-2012 11:53 AM

Just setting up the build environment can be very challenging, if the application is designed to be built on *nix. For example, here are the steps to build FileZilla on Windows:

http://wiki.filezilla-project.org/Co..._under_Windows

jefro 03-03-2012 12:03 PM

Kind of a vague question.

For example. If we say it is a text based program and it is posix one may not need to port it at all. One may only need to add in posix support for windows. If it is a cross platform maybe like qt then that may be a bit easier.

Some of the programs like firefox, filezilla may be an example of cross platform creation. The basic fabric of the design is based on the need to cross platform the app. They stay away from tools and librarys that don't have an equal. Some apps will never be easily ported between OS's.

Java was the big write once run anywhere windows killer.


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