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ceantuco 02-26-2009 11:53 AM

Programming Tutorials
 
Hi Guys,

I want to learn programming. I have 0 programming experience. Does anyone knows a good link where I can get started? I heard that Python is a good language and I would like to start learning it.
Thanks!

JulianTosh 02-26-2009 02:07 PM

google "snake wrangling for kids".. it's written for kids, but it's a great start for learning Python.

H_TeXMeX_H 02-26-2009 02:44 PM

Here's a good python programming guide, even for people who have never programmed:
http://openbookproject.net//thinkCSpy/

JulianTosh 02-26-2009 02:52 PM

oh dayum, i forgot about that one... yes that's a good one too...

just remembered I had this BAMF resource too... tons of stuff:

http://www.awaretek.com/tutorials.html

ceantuco 02-28-2009 01:10 AM

Thank you guys!

spydrmn 02-28-2009 07:06 PM

Not sure if it's kosher to post links to other forums in here, but I've found these tutorials helpful.

http://www.dreamincode.net/forums/showforum78.htm


--spydrmn

taylor_venable 03-01-2009 12:53 PM

Not explicitly requested, but you might find this useful: Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days

sundialsvcs 03-01-2009 10:50 PM

The first program that I ever wrote: took me six months to write, was eight lines long, and had a bug in it. :)

(The personal computer would not be invented for another six years.)

When you're beginning to study programming, don't let yourself get bogged-down in the syntax... "where the commas and semicolons go." Instead, start by skimming any source-code that you can find. (Your Linux system has gobs of it.) Yes, just look at the stuff, and consider (a) what the program is trying to do, and (b) how it goes about doing it. Then, (c) consider how "the designer's intent" is being expressed to this remarkable piece of dumb-machinery that we call a digital computer.

"You learn a lot by watching." Yet, at first, most of what you see you won't understand. So, keep a journal. Write down what you understand and write down any question that you have... then, move on. Once you have captured the question, you can release it from your mind without "losing" the question.

You will experience "the brain explosion" ... frequently. You need to be fully-prepared for the fact that sometimes the answer you are looking for won't come right away, no matter how hard you try. You need to get away, do something else, let it rest, and sincerely hope that your homework isn't due at 10:00 tomorrow morning.

ceantuco 03-02-2009 07:21 AM

Thanks guys for your advice! Sundialsvcs there is no homework, i just want to learn some programming. :P thanks!

Ragnarok Warrior 03-06-2009 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sundialsvcs (Post 3461964)
You will experience "the brain explosion" ... frequently. You need to be fully-prepared for the fact that sometimes the answer you are looking for won't come right away, no matter how hard you try. You need to get away, do something else, let it rest, and sincerely hope that your homework isn't due at 10:00 tomorrow morning.

I've taken a semester each (over the past 6 years mind you) of: FORTRAN, Java, C++, Assembly (I loved it), some digital logic language, and BASIC. You are right, you'll have some overly complicated error message during the debugging process that will take you 3 hours to realize that you forgot a "{" or a ";" somewhere. Your brain will then proceed to explode. This usually happens at the aforementioned 10:00 deadline for the homework.

The big picture counts more than the details in the long run. See what others have done as suggested and learn from it. Once you have learned one programming language you have learned half of what it takes to dive into another language.

linus72 03-06-2009 06:43 PM

Hey-I'm trying to learn Python too-check out these 2 Distro's that are focused on Python ( http://pyrorobotics.org/?page=PyroSoftware ) and ( http://www.robohobby.com/robohobby_linux_live_cd.jsp ) though RoboHobby is more Java I think.

sureshsujatha 03-09-2009 02:06 PM

Any particular reason why you wanna learn Python?

ceantuco 03-15-2009 04:30 AM

well I heard it is a well structured programming language and I noticed that BT3 has almost all its tools written on Python.

metrofox 03-15-2009 04:55 AM

Mmm...BT3 has many tools written on python, but not all...A part of them are also in perl, php...Any way, if you want to use BT3 as your default distro you can even choose slackware. However, you wanna learn python because you'd understand better the tools you're gonna use on BT3. Good method. ;)

jiml8 03-15-2009 11:23 AM

Quote:

You will experience "the brain explosion" ... frequently. You need to be fully-prepared for the fact that sometimes the answer you are looking for won't come right away, no matter how hard you try. You need to get away, do something else, let it rest, and sincerely hope that your homework isn't due at 10:00 tomorrow morning.
A couple of months ago, I solved a knotty problem - one that had been bothering me for awhile (as in: "how do I do this so it is robust, reliable, and accurate") while sitting in a bar drinking a beer and watching a football game. The proper approach just popped into my head, and I worked out the details over another beer.

I woke up in the middle of the night last night...with the solution to another thorny problem in my head. Sat down at the computer for a few minutes, verified the feasibility, went back to bed. It is now on the agenda for me to work on later today.


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