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Old 10-20-2007, 02:40 PM   #1
Abhishek87
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New to programming world


Hello guys I have been using linux for a while and I wish to make tools like bootloaders and stuff which communicate more often with the hardware..I dont have much knowledge of programming but I have started learning XML..Can anyone please tell me which languages should I know to develop such stuff..Thanx in advance
 
Old 10-20-2007, 03:25 PM   #2
thebouv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abhishek87 View Post
Hello guys I have been using linux for a while and I wish to make tools like bootloaders and stuff which communicate more often with the hardware..I dont have much knowledge of programming but I have started learning XML..Can anyone please tell me which languages should I know to develop such stuff..Thanx in advance
First, XML is not a programming language. Keep that in mind. Neither is HTML.

If you want to start programming for the Linux kernel and/or create hardware-level programs, definitely need to learn C.
 
Old 10-20-2007, 03:29 PM   #3
pixellany
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I would define programming language as a set of syntax rules for writing instruction for a computer. I would think that html + css would qualify.

For hardware interface, you want C and maybe assembler.
 
Old 10-20-2007, 05:12 PM   #4
Alien_Hominid
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Off course asm. And I wouldn't start with AT&T syntax, which is used by gasm (still don't know why???) but rather use standard Intel asm syntax and use nasm or fasm for development. *ML languages are not so programming but more like data definition languages.
 
Old 10-20-2007, 06:00 PM   #5
paulsm4
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Hi -

You can do XML-related programming in any language. But historically, Java and XML have always been a "good fit". All current versions of Java have XML support built-in: you don't necessarily need to download or install any additional libraries to read, write and manipulate XML data.

Here are a couple of good tutorials:

http://java.sun.com/xml/tutorial_intro.html
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xm...y/x-jaxp1.html

'Hope that helps .. PSM

PS:
"nasm" (Intel syntax) and "gas" (ATT syntax) are both perfectly good assemblers for Linux. The issue is, there are two different syntaxes for assembly language: the syntax supported by the old Microsoft "masm", and the cross-platform ATT "gas" syntax.

Which you prefer is a matter of taste. Most of the PC-DOS assembler examples you'll find on the web are in "masm" syntax ... but of course most of these same examples will give a lot of misleading information about using 16-bit 808x memory segments and using real-mode 808x interrupts.

Should you wish to learn more, one very good book (which, BTW, uses the Linux "gas" syntax) is:

Professional Assembly Language, Richard Blum

Mr.Blum introduces you to basic assembly language constructs, but he also shows you how to call into Linux, and make use of standard GnuLib runtime functions, with assembler. A very good book!

Last edited by paulsm4; 10-21-2007 at 02:39 AM.
 
Old 10-21-2007, 02:30 AM   #6
Abhishek87
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hey thank you all for your great help!!! It was really helpful
 
Old 10-21-2007, 06:00 PM   #7
makyo
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Hi.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
I would define programming language as a set of syntax rules for writing instruction for a computer. I would think that html + css would qualify.

For hardware interface, you want C and maybe assembler.
I agree with the latter, but probably not the former. I tend to side with:
Quote:
Non-computational languages, such as markup languages like HTML or formal grammars like BNF, are usually not considered programming languages.

-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Programming_language
I've been trying to think of an analogy to illustrate this, but I haven't been very successful so far -- perhaps something like the description of a perfume, the color, the smell, the taste*, etc., as opposed to the instructions for actually mixing, manufacturing it -- but all more of a quibble ... cheers, makyo

* I make an after-shave out of vodka, rum, cinnamon, all-spice, orange zest, and bay leaf
 
Old 10-21-2007, 06:22 PM   #8
PAix
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Hold the bay leaf, I'm up for a large aftershave sample in a tall tumbler with ice.
Traditionally scripting languages tended to be less complicated than full blown languages, but easier to impliment (no compilation necessary) and (take bash and awk for example) tended to provide the glue that tied together application programs and the system. Strength was in knowing enough about both to be useful. Perl is in a category of it's own. It seems difficult to describe it as a scripting language as it is almost whatever you want it to be - ubiquitous.
Not too much ice thanks. Favourite xml flavour: Kml today, but it's a data description language for all that.
 
Old 10-21-2007, 06:48 PM   #9
turbo_spool
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If you want to work with hardware, as others mentioned, you need to learn C. While some don't like to recommend it, I love Kernighan & Ritchie's "The C Programming Language". Very clear, to the point, and as 'from the source' as it gets. It may not be the best introduction to programming in general however, so first I would start out with another book. For instance I used on once called "An Introctuction to Computer Science and Programming" by Walter Savitch.

The important thing is to just pick a language and start having some fun experimenting.
 
Old 10-22-2007, 12:59 PM   #10
Abhishek87
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I have heard about k&R its a good book as far as i know..and its just 250 pages something i guess....
 
Old 10-22-2007, 03:14 PM   #11
indienick
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The K&R book The C Programming Language is awesome. I had looked at other C programming guides, but they were either written to be taught to an 8 year old, too buzzwordy, or completely glossed over certain aspects (read: pointers).

K&Rs' book was definitely written as a teaching tool - not as a "let's see how much jargon I can slam into several hundred pages" text. What I really like about that book is that mid-section there are little exercises for you to practice what you've just learned.

 
Old 10-22-2007, 08:21 PM   #12
PAix
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Written by the original designers of the language. Straight from the horse's mouth. A very acclaimed book as the only place to start learning C. Not expensive either.
 
Old 10-22-2007, 10:31 PM   #13
indienick
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...and whatever you do, don't buy it at Chapters; buy it online at Amazon.

When I purchased it at Chapters, it cost me upwards of $60, when I looked on Amazon and could have bought it for less than $30.
 
Old 10-22-2007, 11:02 PM   #14
PAix
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A once only purchase and a lifetime investment and you are haggling about the price.
A man after my own heart obviously. compman.co.uk 25.56 in the UK. Post office allowing, books normally turn up next morning if ordered before 4pm. I suppose that living 8 miles from the warehouse might have something to do with the delivery time.
 
Old 10-24-2007, 03:44 PM   #15
indienick
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Haha - and, if you're feeling stealthy enough, it might adjust the price for you too. Chat with a few of the dock workers, as it were.

Hah.
 
  


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