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Old 12-22-2005, 09:07 AM   #1
Uday123
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need info. on 3rd party tools


Hi all,
I need an info. about 3rd party tools(other than packages) which are installed in a linux box.
tell me if any command will give this info.
guide me how to get this info. in linux and solaris.

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 12-22-2005, 09:45 AM   #2
XavierP
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What sort of packages? There are only a relative handful of "default" packages, most others are specified by the distro makers.
 
Old 12-22-2005, 10:07 AM   #3
Matir
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Something like:?
Code:
ls /bin /usr/bin /usr/local/bin /usr/sbin /sbin /usr/local/sbin
 
Old 12-22-2005, 11:28 PM   #4
Uday123
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I want to know that a particular system will have the 3rd party softwares like Oracle,DB2,informix or phpldapadmin...etc.
so how can i get the above information.I mean If is there any commands... plz let me know.(OR)Tell me how to findout such softwares in a system.

I need the same info. in Solaris and Linux.Please help me.

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 12-23-2005, 12:04 AM   #5
chrism01
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If you have some idea of the file names, then at the cmd line as root try:

find / -iname <filename_here> -print 2>/dev/null

On an RPM based Linux distro you could try

rpm -q |grep -i <yourfilename>
 
Old 12-24-2005, 09:10 PM   #6
paulsm4
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1. As Chrism01 pointed out, you can find out all packages installed on an RPM-based system (such as Redhat or Suse Linux) with the "rpm" command.
EXAMPLE: rpm -qa|less

2. You can do the same thing on Solaris using the pkginfo command:
EXAMPLE: pkginfo | less

'Hope that helps .. PSM
 
Old 12-27-2005, 08:42 AM   #7
Uday123
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Hi,

I Know the concept which u guys explained.
But the thing is I want to know whether oracle/DB2...etc are installed or not?

Here in mycase i don't know the softwares(oracle,DB2 etc)installed in a m/n.Even though i want to find out them by writing script/command.that is what i am expecting. I think now u guys can understand my problem. Can you please help me.

Thanks in advance,
 
Old 12-27-2005, 09:40 AM   #8
paulsm4
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The only way to find out whether Oracle (for example) is installed or not ...
... is to start out with SOME idea of what you're LOOKING FOR!

I recall from my Solaris days that Oracle *did* use the Solaris package manager, and you *could* find out whether it was installed or not with a command like this (I don't recall the *exact* syntax):
Code:
  pkginfo | grep -i ora
So you get to do the following:

1. Find a system with Oracle installed.
Or do a trial install yourself.
Or get a logon to Oracle's OTN and read the on-line documentation.

2. Determine how it *should* be installed, and write a script to check for it.

3. Determine if your organization (school or company) has a *policy* that
states the database *will* be installed like your script *expects* it to be.

4. Repeat steps 1..3 for each platform your organization supports (Linux, Solaris, etc)

5. Repeat steps 1..4 for each database your organization supports (Oracle, DB2, MS-SQL, etc)

These are steps that YOU need to do. There is, unfortunately, no "one-size-fits-all" answer that you can read out of a book ... or get told about on a forum like this.

Sorry!
 
Old 12-27-2005, 12:32 PM   #9
XavierP
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Oracle, because it is a very expensive piece of software, will not be installed by default. You would have to buy it and install it.
 
Old 12-27-2005, 11:12 PM   #10
paulsm4
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Hi again, Uday123 -

XavierP is correct: you're not likely to find Oracle on the run-of-the-mill home user's Linux box. Nor DB2.

But let's assume that you *do* have Oracle and DB2 installed on various hosts in your organization, and that you need a script to check for them. My previous advice still stands:

0. There is NOT a sure-fire, 100% guaranteed method to test if the database is installed.

1. You need to find a copy of Oracle in your organization and see how it's installed. There are several ways to accomplish this, including getting a copy from your organization's librarian and doing a trial install it yourself.

2. Once you've determined how your organization happens to install it, you'll be able to intelligently write your script.

3. Before relying on the script, however, you need to check to make sure your organization has a policy that the database will be installed on similar hosts the same way. If there is no such policy, your script might still fail.

4. The script might vary from platform to platform (Solaris vs. Red Hat Linux vs Ubuntu Linux, for example)

5. The script might also vary from database to database (Oracle vs DB2 vs mySQL, for example)

Your .. PSM
 
  


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