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Old 02-01-2006, 01:50 PM   #1
DanTaylor
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need advice from career programmers


I am wanting to do my career in programming, but I am not sure where to start or what I need to know to start. I don't want to do visual, but I am not sure exactly what I want to do. Could any of you career programmers list where you work, what you do, and how to get started?
 
Old 02-01-2006, 04:04 PM   #2
halvy
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i'm not exactly a career programmer, but i'v done my share of it.

i would pick out an area i reallly liked, like web, servers, whatever.

then i'd combine that with something else i liked, which wasn't necessarily 'computer' related.. like: helping people, medicine, government, whatever.

programming as you may know does not necessarily require any formal education, except when you combine it (like i suggested above) with something else.. and even then, depending on the field of interest, you may not need much schooling.

your quest for traditional degrees are based on if you want to 'work for someone'. however if you plan on starting your own consulting business, or working with 'buds' on projects, then certificats and degrees become less of a factor for sure.

i'm NOT knocking any education here.. i'm just saying that even if you 'go to school' alot, you STILL have to wind up 'teaching yourself', and with programming this is something you can do at your leasure-- out of school.

also i'd get into something (if you are interested in this as a good paying career as well) that is 'hot'... like now i suppose linux apps are, again 'helping or teaching people', or medicine.

if you look around you, almost EVERYTHING can be improved, or there is a need for something to be 'invented'.

good luck, keep us informed.

Last edited by halvy; 02-01-2006 at 04:09 PM.
 
Old 02-01-2006, 04:18 PM   #3
nephish
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well said, halvy !
 
Old 02-01-2006, 04:27 PM   #4
Mara
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Beeing good at programming requires a number of things. First, patience. Second, problem-solving skills. You can train both and they don't refer to a specific programming language.

When you're good at one language, you can move easily to any other. They work the same at a certain level. Seeing it comes with time.

So there comes another important thing, experience. Just write. School projects are not enough.
 
Old 02-01-2006, 05:24 PM   #5
italiano40
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you need to know Java and C++
also what do you want to know (Game, Databases, Software)
you also need to know(Know everything you should be able to complier your own programs in your mind) many different language i know about ten
should know at least these
java
c++
C
python
many things
then you need to look for a job try (Monster.com the best)
I work at a linux OS company(can't say names)
 
Old 02-01-2006, 05:28 PM   #6
Penguin of Wonder
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I know you can't say, but it would be hillarous if you worked for say RedHat, but used SLAX.

Sorry I had to say that.
 
Old 02-01-2006, 06:14 PM   #7
italiano40
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I can tell you I don't work for a Red Hat, i used too and it was nice
 
Old 02-02-2006, 04:53 AM   #8
r3g
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Most programming jobs tend to revolve around business needs, so try and get in with some local company (say an electrical store) and get chatting to them about how computers might be used to make things easier for them or ask them what they would improve about their current system to make things better.

This will give you some "real-world" problems to solve. It makes the learning process both faster and more interesting if you have a real project to work on.

You can write as many "Hello World" projects in as many programming languages as you like, but it isn't until you get to work on real problems that you really start to learn how to do things.
 
Old 02-02-2006, 11:23 PM   #9
me_the_apprentice
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The most amazing thing about being a programmer is how a business problem gets translated into Binary language. Moreover, Dan, I would suggest the best way of learning a new thing is to have a "jump start" -- dont think what all others have been doing and how (and why ;-)...

Start with something that appeals you-- it can be Java/C-C++/Shell/BASH/Perl/JSP; anything. The bottomline is developing the logic, and it can be practiced with any language -- because technology change, language change-- "Because the Busines Requirements change". So hit the root, develop the logic-skills. Also, would suggest one more thing, be a master of any one language (and plz plz dont relate it with current Market Requirements). Because once you get good at one language, then picking others to the moderate level wouldnt be a big deal.

Let me know if it makes sense to you!!
Thanks!!
 
Old 02-02-2006, 11:37 PM   #10
xhi
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i am an aspiring career programmer.. or welder.. whichever picks up at whichever time.. i prefer welding in the summer and programming in the winter.. but it does not always work out that way i guess..

anyhow not focusing on a particular language, I would say OOP is the primary concept that should be focused on.. it is the modern programming style and is the focus of nearly every popular language in use today..

as far as langs go, java is IME the easiest job to get.. well other than a mom-n-pops webpage shop.. but java is quite easy for rookies to get into.. c++ is a tougher nut to crack.. i have never even applied for anything else other than those two.. they always want too much experience, or a bigger degree than i have..

the best thing to do to get that job.. is to pick somewhere that you want to work, ill call it company X.. then go to a bar that is close to company X.. keep going to the bar until you befriend someone who works at company X.. then get them to get you an interview..

Last edited by xhi; 02-03-2006 at 12:13 AM.
 
Old 02-03-2006, 12:18 PM   #11
Penguin of Wonder
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by xhi
the best thing to do to get that job.. is to pick somewhere that you want to work, ill call it company X.. then go to a bar that is close to company X.. keep going to the bar until you befriend someone who works at company X.. then get them to get you an interview..
LoL I like your style xhi, I think i'll try that!
 
Old 02-03-2006, 12:41 PM   #12
bigearsbilly
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get some sort of certificate.
degree preferred.
Employers like that sort of crap even though it means nothing.
It's a way to get on the ladder.
 
Old 02-03-2006, 01:53 PM   #13
DanTaylor
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I know perl(sort of) and am enrolled in running start so I will get my AA opt. 2 majoring in programming(will learn c java basic c++) and my high school diploma simultaneously. Is that enough to get me a beginning programming job - also I am learning c# and my sql on my own.

Should I get a BA in programming or not even bother. Thanks for your replies so far!
 
Old 02-03-2006, 02:29 PM   #14
xhi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigearsbilly
get some sort of certificate.
degree preferred.
Employers like that sort of crap even though it means nothing.
It's a way to get on the ladder.
completely agreed.. unless you get incredibly lucky it is hard to even get an employer to read past 'education' section on a resume if it does not have a bachelors on it..

in my experience anyhow.
 
Old 02-03-2006, 02:37 PM   #15
Stack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xhi
completely agreed.. unless you get incredibly lucky it is hard to even get an employer to read past 'education' section on a resume if it does not have a bachelors on it..

in my experience anyhow.
Speaking as someone who works in the industry your resume heads straight to the bin if you don't have a BSC.
 
  


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