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anroy 07-22-2007 08:20 AM

Linux Driver Development
 
I want to study the development of drivers on Linux. Very hardcore stuff.

I found a great book, or rather the ONLY book, on the topic here.
http://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/

Does anyone know if there exist simple inexpensive hardware dummy devices to test input to and output from serial ports and parallel ports?

I have heard of something called breakout boards but was not really able to understand what they do. Would these be what I want?

How about dummy devices for USB or LAN?

Thanks!

ineya 07-22-2007 08:40 AM

How about some USB lamp? Should be cheap and you can still practice some simple techniques. (For me they are all complex though :-))

ineya 07-22-2007 08:43 AM

The Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide
Peter Jay Salzman
Michael Burian
Ori Pomerantz
Copyright 2001 Peter Jay Salzman

theNbomr 05-12-2011 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by anroy (Post 2832521)
Does anyone know if there exist simple inexpensive hardware dummy devices to test input to and output from serial ports and parallel ports?

I have heard of something called breakout boards but was not really able to understand what they do. Would these be what I want?

For serial ports, the best things to use are, in no particular order: an oscilloscope (with capable operator), another serial port with a decent terminal emulator attached (C-Kermit is my strong preference), a breakout box, a DVM. For parallel ports, a DVM, and maybe some LEDs with appropriate limiting resistors attached. A pile of hardware documentation for either, much of which can be found online (although parallel port info is becoming scarcer by the day).

A breakout box is simply a small box, with D-Sub connectors on each side, so you can insert it between two serial devices. Usually it has switches or a jumpering system to allow you to connect the conductors of the two serial cables in arbitrary ways. They also usually have tri-color LEDs that can be used to see the states of the various signals in the RS-232 interface. 20 years ago every IT nerd had one of these beside his coffee cup; now I don't know where you'd buy one.

Are you planning to re-write the existing drivers for standard serial/parallel PC hardware, or are you going to use those devices as tools to exercise/monitor some other device for which you'll create a driver?

--- rod.


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