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jmc1987 11-04-2011 11:07 PM

Learning Multiple Programming languages.
 
I figured befor I learn everything I wanted to learn I should ask 1 major question first.

I know lots of your huge programs are made up with more than 1 language like c++, and perl and I have interest in more than 1 lanauge.

Languages I want to learn or in the process of learning

c++
perl
bash scripting
php
and for gui something like qt4 or something.

Now I've learned a tad bit on c++ but at the time I find my self with no time to continue on now I got lots of time and after doing some research people say lean the most difficult of your choice first and then onto other languages as you would find a faster learning experience.

Right now I've actually chose perl because its easier to learn and its not so strict and should be faster to learn since I might find my self with no time again.

One of my main goals is to launch a free hosting company and a ad network so I wanted to build my own hosting control panel and I figured perl is an excellent language for that.

Now my biggest concern is somebody told me I'm making a big mistake in learning all these language as I'm going to cause some mass confusion. I plan to learn each language clearly befor moving onto the next.

What is your suggestions?

Thor_2.0 11-05-2011 07:37 AM

Quote:

Now my biggest concern is somebody told me I'm making a big mistake in learning all these language as I'm going to cause some mass confusion. I plan to learn each language clearly befor moving onto the next.
Whoever told you that is right. In fact, why learn everything anyway? Turn it around for a spell. What you you want to have as output? Programs that need to be installed? Stuff that needs to have a web presence? Just some automating? The purpose defines the choice of program language.

The subject it this vast, you cannot possibly have enough working knowledge of all of them to do you any good. Dont generalise but specialise instead.

Good luck

Thor

Sergei Steshenko 11-05-2011 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmc1987 (Post 4516252)
I figured befor I learn everything I wanted to learn I should ask 1 major question first.

I know lots of your huge programs are made up with more than 1 language like c++, and perl and I have interest in more than 1 lanauge.

Languages I want to learn or in the process of learning

c++
perl
bash scripting
php
and for gui something like qt4 or something.

Now I've learned a tad bit on c++ but at the time I find my self with no time to continue on now I got lots of time and after doing some research people say lean the most difficult of your choice first and then onto other languages as you would find a faster learning experience.

Right now I've actually chose perl because its easier to learn and its not so strict and should be faster to learn since I might find my self with no time again.

One of my main goals is to launch a free hosting company and a ad network so I wanted to build my own hosting control panel and I figured perl is an excellent language for that.

Now my biggest concern is somebody told me I'm making a big mistake in learning all these language as I'm going to cause some mass confusion. I plan to learn each language clearly befor moving onto the next.

What is your suggestions?

I really am not sure you need bash scripting if you know Perl. The only advantage of (ba)sh script compared to Perl is lower resource usage, but it is important in resource poor embedded systems.

Though I don't know PHP, it's a sense a derivative of Perl (yeah, I know, I overstretch).

Perl and C++ are quite different languages in their internal ideology. And that's the beauty. Start reading http://hop.perl.plover.com/ to really understand what Perl is.

Qt is written in C++, so you have to learn C++ first. I don't think Qt has anything to do with your "free hosting company" though.

And I don't think your "free hosting company" is a viable option - look up "entry barrier" WRT business. But it's none of my business. Anyway, as they say it Russian, "if while chasing I won't catch, I'll at least warm up".

SigTerm 11-05-2011 08:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmc1987 (Post 4516252)
One of my main goals is to launch a free hosting company and a ad network so I wanted to build my own hosting control panel and I figured perl is an excellent language for that.

As I understand it, you don't need to know programming at all in order to do that.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Henry Ford
“If I should really want to answer the foolish question you have just asked, or any of the other questions you have been asking me, let me remind you that I have a row of electric push-buttons on my desk, and by pushing the right button, I can summon to my aid men who can answer any question I desire to ask concerning the business to which I am devoting most of my efforts. Now, will you kindly tell me, why I should clutter up my mind with general knowledge, for the purpose of being able to answer questions, when I have men around me who can supply any knowledge I require?”

The point of business is that while you don't know everything, you can hire several people that possess knowledge/skills you don't have.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmc1987 (Post 4516252)
What is your suggestions?

In order to learn programming language, you need some kind of problem you HAVE to solve that requires that language. If you don't have that problem, you won't learn the language.

catkin 11-05-2011 08:18 AM

It probably takes more than a lifetime to master {"learn each language clearly") any one of those languages. Rather than set out to learn a list of languages, how about learning as much as you need of the languages that are best suited to projects you work on? In practice that's what most of us do. If we are lucky we get to spend enough time working with each of the languages we tackle to develop a good proficiency but for many of us there are a few languages that we just learned enough to do what had to be done and never had reason to do much more with them.

Specialising is nice but sometimes opportunism rules.

jmc1987 11-05-2011 11:53 AM

Well just to clear it there are several things I would like to do.

Now on bash scripting your right the only reason I chose it because that is something I need to learn because I've planned on managing other servers and systems and everyone might not have perl and bash does you lesser resources from what I understand.

I have some projects that I want to do which c++ could do most of them so that is what of the required language. I chose to learn perl because its excellent for small programs and linking tools to get automating task but bash can automate things as well.

The only reason I chose to learn php because its some of the web programing language and from what I've told its far easy to learn if you have experience with programing in other languages.

But as the catkin said I more of familiarizing my self with other languages but really sticking to perl and c++. As c++ can be a more efficient language is written correctly and perl can be from simple programs to web programming.

But Yea I try to be an over achiever. The only real thing I have to find is a graphic designer because I have no patience with it since I do something and find its not what I want maybe because I haven't done the whole picture and I throw it out lol.

Thanks for posting.


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