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Old 01-27-2004, 03:28 AM   #1
jinksys
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Question Good Assembly Books


hey,

Ive been traveling through the forest of assembly language for the last month or so and I was wondering if anyone knows of any good assembly books. Ive been looking around but it seems most assembly books are written for DOS/windows or 16bit real mode. I bought Assembly language for intel based computers from my university bookstore earlier this year, what a waste.
I do NOT want to learn MASM's stupid syntax, I want to learn assembly for intel machines with At&t or NASM syntax. Can anyone point me in that direction? A GOOD ASSEMBLY BOOK THAT:

1)Covers the intel x86 instruction set.
2)Uses At&t or intel syntax.
3)Covers 32bit Protected mode.
4)Goes into material at depth, and does not use HLA or any other high level corner cutting.

I don't mind driving to a university bookstore, as long as its under 200 miles from ST LOUIS, MO.

Any help appreciated!
 
Old 01-27-2004, 08:49 AM   #2
deiussum
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I haven't looked at too many Assembly books, but for the Intel x86 instruction set, why not go right to the source? Intel has documentation available for download describing their full instruction set.

Here are some links:
http://developer.intel.com/design/pe...als/245470.htm
http://developer.intel.com/design/pe...als/245471.htm
http://developer.intel.com/design/pe...als/245472.htm
http://www.intel.com/cd/ids/develope...ence/index.htm

Last edited by deiussum; 01-27-2004 at 08:52 AM.
 
Old 01-27-2004, 10:02 AM   #3
infamous41md
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reading volume 1 and browsing volume 2 is how i learned. vol 3 is also very interesting but kinda confusing. you should also read 'info gcc' for all the inline asm rules.
 
Old 01-29-2004, 03:41 AM   #4
jinksys
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thanks deiussum,
I downloaded the pdfs, and was very surprised. I
liked em so much I requested the hardcopies. Thanks
a million.
 
  


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