LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming
User Name
Password
Programming This forum is for all programming questions.
The question does not have to be directly related to Linux and any language is fair game.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-05-2007, 04:45 PM   #1
wlburns
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Missouri USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
Question Detecting Linux or Unix over a network


I have programmed for over 20 years, but always in Windows. Recently our company has been adding some Linux, Macintosh, and other Unix type PCs to the network. I have a scanner that I use to inventory and track all the PCs on the network. It can of course detect and report the different Windows versions across the network. But I need a way to tell if the remote PC is a PC running a non-Windows OS. I can't just assume if it is not windows, then it is a non-windows PC, because we have hundreds of other network type devices too. (printers, routers, switches, pbxs, etc) So right now, it is not tracking any of the Linux or Macintosh PCs that I know are there.

Does Linux/Macintosh/Unix have any unique open TCP/IP ports that I can use to detect it across a network that are specific to Unix? Or maybe a unique sharename, or...? Or a way to query a response from them that they would respond to?

I would like to be able to tell between Linux, Macintosh, Unix, Sun, etc. But even if I can just tell if it is a Unix based OS, that would help. If not, how can I tell it is a PC and not something like a printer, etc.

Note: This would not be across the internet, I only need to test the devices on my own LAN/WAN.

Any ideas?

-William.
 
Old 08-05-2007, 05:00 PM   #2
General Failure
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 384

Rep: Reputation: 34
On my box,
Code:
nmap -sT -O -PT 127.0.0.1
shows (among other stuff)
Code:
TCP/IP fingerprint:
SInfo(V=4.11%P=i486-slackware-linux-gnu%D=8/5%Tm=46B64788%O=631%C=1)
So it should be possible I guess, but I'm no TCP/IP guru and I assume this might catch other Linux operated devices as well. My Fritzbox doesn't seem to respond though

Last edited by General Failure; 08-05-2007 at 05:03 PM.
 
Old 08-05-2007, 06:13 PM   #3
wlburns
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Missouri USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
nmap does appear to show the OS of most remote PCs which is encouraging. But I forgot to mention the scanner is running from a Windows server.(which will not have nmap) It needs to be able to detect Linux/Unix across the network. Wouldn't happen to know what TCP/IP or Netbios query or packet the nmap command is using, would you?

-William
 
Old 08-05-2007, 11:35 PM   #4
indienick
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: London, ON, Canada
Distribution: Arch, Ubuntu, Slackware, OpenBSD, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,853

Rep: Reputation: 65
What level of control do you have over these PCs? My suggestion (to make things easier) would be to have any (and all) Linux/UNIX boxes install Samba, and configure it so the PC name contains a significant letter of some sort; say the last letter of the PC name being an "L" for Linux, "U" for UNIX, "M" for Mac.
 
Old 08-06-2007, 08:47 PM   #5
wlburns
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Missouri USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I am in a position that I can suggest a naming standard for them. However with 60,000+ PCs, and they are scattered all over the US, it is nearly impossible to get everyone to conform to standards. So it would be nice to be able to find them regardless of what our remote field tech did.

I know that they will not have Microsoft file sharing or be able to remote connect on the registry like Windows does. So I can tell they are non-Windows from that. But how can I tell if they are a PC at all and not one of the 1000s of other network type devices like printers, routers, etc.

I have been playing with Slackware on one of my PCs at home for several months and love it so far. But the most I have done across the network with it is use Firefox to browse the internet. What kind of things can be done to remote Linux PCs across the network? For example do they have something like windows admin shares that I can test for? Or remote desktop? (something that will be on them by default so that I dont have to rely on them loading a client)
 
Old 08-06-2007, 09:53 PM   #6
indienick
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: London, ON, Canada
Distribution: Arch, Ubuntu, Slackware, OpenBSD, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,853

Rep: Reputation: 65
Ahhhhhh - what can't Linux do across a network!

If you set up something like XDMCP you can log in (graphically) across a network.

SSH (Secure SHell) - text-based administration, and is frighteningly useful. I use this almost exclusively for administrative work on any network I monitor. This is the "de facto" of network-based administration in the UNIX world.

There are graphical remote desktop applications, but I believe they're usually tied into the desktop environment. I'm 99% certain KDE has a remote desktop sharing application of some sort.
 
  


Reply

Tags
detect, network, system


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linux Network Card Not Detecting activeasim Linux - Newbie 2 07-17-2006 09:00 AM
Unix Shell Scripting, detecting the enter key WinterSt Programming 7 09-01-2004 08:27 AM
Network connection between Linux/UNIX machines marv77 Linux - Newbie 3 08-13-2004 09:01 AM
Best Linux?unix free router/network simulator hasan Linux - Software 1 06-29-2004 03:06 AM
Steven's Unix network programing-for Linux programmer? beginner16 Programming 5 01-12-2004 10:31 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:38 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration