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Old 07-10-2010, 11:48 PM   #1
t1nm@n
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C programming with linux


hey guys i wanted to learn c programming in linux.... but all the tutorials and books are based on windows
_____________________________________________________
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
clrscr();
printf("hello");
getch();
}
______________________________________________________

that was the first program i did with bcc32 compiler in windows.... what shuld i do for the same in linux....
 
Old 07-10-2010, 11:59 PM   #2
Kenny_Strawn
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Here is a more portable piece of code that will work better on Linux:

Code:
#include <stdio.h>

int main ()
{
    printf("Hello, World!\n")
    return 0;
}
 
Old 07-11-2010, 12:06 AM   #3
t1nm@n
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just a question ken...why choose int mani i dint have any integer values...
 
Old 07-11-2010, 12:16 AM   #4
MrCode
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Quote:
why choose int mani i dint have any integer values...
It's the standard for writing C prorgrams on UNIX-like OSes (this includes Linux). The return statement at the end of main() spits out a zero to the shell, so that it can be used as, for example, an error code if something goes wrong in the program (invalid input, etc.):

Code:
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    if(strcmp(argv[1],"something"))
        printf("You entered the right argument! :D\n");
    else                          //If the user gives anything other than the word "something" as an argument
    {
        printf("Error, you entered %s instead!",argv[1]);
        return 1;  //Return an error code. This can be anything,
                   //as long as it's not 0, as that's the
                   //standard code for "success".
    }

    return 0; //If everything went smoothly, go ahead and return nothing.
}
If I were to call this program "something", and I ran ./something "something" in the shell, it would return a 0 to the shell, which could be used in for example a shell script to show that the program ran successfully. Had I just ran ./something "nothing" (or anything other than "something", or just no argument at all), then it would have returned a one to the shell, and I could use that in a shell script to show that the program failed.

Gurus, if I missed a few important details, please don't hesitate to provide them. I'm a little tired/sleepy as I write this, so I'm probably not able to concentrate as well as I could.

Last edited by MrCode; 07-11-2010 at 12:32 AM. Reason: fixed the parentheses around the if statement :-P
 
Old 07-11-2010, 12:22 AM   #5
t1nm@n
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WOW.... thats gr8 so any way i can start learning with c in linux .. i'm new to programming


any books
 
Old 07-11-2010, 12:55 AM   #6
Kenny_Strawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t1nm@n View Post
WOW.... thats gr8 so any way i can start learning with c in linux .. i'm new to programming


any books
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Programming
 
Old 07-11-2010, 01:16 AM   #7
pixellany
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http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-Linu.../dp/1861002971

Note: Please do not use texting shorthand here
 
Old 07-11-2010, 01:42 PM   #8
baxzius
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#include<stdio.h>
/*#include<conio.h> this is not used in linux c programming. because conio.h doesnt exist in linux.*/
void main()
{
clrscr();
printf("hello");
//getch(); you cannot use this function because conio.h doesnt exist in linux
}
SO what i am coming to say is that you may programmed in turbo c or c++.But Friend a slight different in linux programming.you have understand about following sections for studying linux C programming.
1.Compilation
2.linking.
3.making.
4.Running or Execution.

And understand.... like windows C programming,there is no rules to use specific IDE. you can edit your c programs on any editor. but i heard code::blocks are the greatest C programming IDE in linux. it helps the programmers very well.


Well if you are so so so so so lazy to study the new functions and headerfiles of linux c programming. i will tell you a adventorous trick ways.

enter into the location
/usr/include
you may see many files concern extension header file. just view the headerfile and read the prototypes of functions. just put it onthe program with apropriate specification of header files.
start your programming

PLEASE UNDERSTAND LINUX DOESNT CONTAINS graphics.h HEADERFILE. BECAUSE INSTEAD OF IT. YOU HAVE TO SDL LIBRARY FUNCTIONS.
 
Old 07-11-2010, 02:01 PM   #9
arvindk.monu
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Hi
Int main comes because when you will run a program it should return a status to operating status(Linux),so when you program will become a process it will return a status of it to Linux,whether program worked correctly or not.

second thing for Learning C/C++....you can use Anjuta IDE
 
Old 07-11-2010, 04:08 PM   #10
baxzius
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People i would like to say that..
Do you think that could your linux box can compile source codes of softwares with perfectly.
if you dont have enough library dependencies then surely you cannot play with open source or hacking
Dont you understand?

hey people please update your libraries.
do you wanna write Graphical user interface programs(gtk libraries)
do you wanna write Ncurses programs (ncurses libraries)
do you write graphics related programs(games) (SDL libraries)
do you wanna write kde based windows(qt libraries)

have you configure your kernelheader files?
 
Old 07-11-2010, 05:22 PM   #11
dugan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t1nm@n View Post
any books
Buy this. It's the best C tutorial I've found; platform neutral, and easily worth the initial investment.

http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Plus-5t...dp/0672326965/

I read it in 2-3 nights after I got it.

Last edited by dugan; 07-11-2010 at 05:28 PM.
 
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Old 07-11-2010, 06:58 PM   #12
Tinkster
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Moved: This thread is more suitable in <PROGRAMMING> and has been moved accordingly to help your thread/question get the exposure it deserves.
 
Old 07-11-2010, 07:36 PM   #13
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Every programmer starting to program C should start with Kernigan & Ritchie: The C programming language.

Examples in the book work in Linux, when the book was written the authors worked on Unix.

There is no shortcut in learning programming, you have to put in effort to get programs out.

jlinkels
 
Old 07-11-2010, 08:59 PM   #14
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlinkels View Post
Every programmer starting to program C should start with Kernigan & Ritchie: The C programming language.
It's easy to find a free PDF copy of it online.

Also, check out Cprogramming.com.
 
Old 07-12-2010, 07:39 AM   #15
Sergei Steshenko
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlinkels View Post
Every programmer starting to program C should start with Kernigan & Ritchie: The C programming language.

Examples in the book work in Linux, when the book was written the authors worked on Unix.

There is no shortcut in learning programming, you have to put in effort to get programs out.

jlinkels
Even though I myself started with the book about 30 years ago, I'm not sure it's the case today.

Generally speaking, regardless of of programming language, it's worth studying two things in parallel - the language by a textbook and the same language by its standard. For the latter: http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg...docs/n1124.pdf (for C99).

A useful site: http://deitel.com/ResourceCenters/Pr...4/Default.aspx

...

A book on "C" (the C89 version):

http://publications.gbdirect.co.uk/c_book/ -> http://publications.gbdirect.co.uk/c...the_c_book.pdf .

C99 is far better to my taste than C89. On C99: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-c99.html .

Last edited by Sergei Steshenko; 07-12-2010 at 07:41 AM.
 
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