LinuxQuestions.org
Visit the LQ Articles and Editorials section
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming
User Name
Password
Programming This forum is for all programming questions.
The question does not have to be directly related to Linux and any language is fair game.

Notices

Reply
 
LinkBack Search this Thread
Old 09-22-2008, 07:43 AM   #61
lmenten
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sergei Steshenko View Post
I think you missed my point regarding Perl.

I meant I use Perl to generate C/C++ code, i.e. I use it as a better than CPP/C++ templates engine.

And, FWIW, Perl is compiled into bytecode (as Java, Python, Ruby, but _not_ as sh, tcl), so it's not an interpreted language.

I did miss your point. I agree. Using Perl gives one close control over the code that is generated. Standard libraries of Perl "templates" would be a powerful tool.

These byte codes (and abstract machine code instruction sets) used to be called "Interpreted Languages." (E.g. the SC of the UCSD Pascal p-System.)

Wikipedia says "In computer programming an interpreted language is a programming language whose implementation often takes the form of an interpreter." Virtual machine code is still interpreted. Wikipedia puts Perl into the class of virtual machine interpreted languages.

Basic and FORTRAN were among the first to be compiled into them. Pascal had a widely used specified language (P-System stack code). If the compiler generates an abstract rather than machine specific code, it is still called an interpreted language implementation. Byte codes still require an interpreter and dynamic languages do incur an overhead. Java and Python are occasionally compiled directly into machine specific language for efficiency. They are still called interpreted languages because that was the target design.
 
Old 09-22-2008, 08:13 AM   #62
Sergei Steshenko
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Posts: 4,481

Rep: Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmenten View Post
I did miss your point. I agree. Using Perl gives one close control over the code that is generated. Standard libraries of Perl "templates" would be a powerful tool.

These byte codes (and abstract machine code instruction sets) used to be called "Interpreted Languages." (E.g. the SC of the UCSD Pascal p-System.)

Wikipedia says "In computer programming an interpreted language is a programming language whose implementation often takes the form of an interpreter." Virtual machine code is still interpreted. Wikipedia puts Perl into the class of virtual machine interpreted languages.

Basic and FORTRAN were among the first to be compiled into them. Pascal had a widely used specified language (P-System stack code). If the compiler generates an abstract rather than machine specific code, it is still called an interpreted language implementation. Byte codes still require an interpreter and dynamic languages do incur an overhead. Java and Python are occasionally compiled directly into machine specific language for efficiency. They are still called interpreted languages because that was the target design.
Well, my point WRT compiled/interpreted is that Perl and the like first compile the whole code (I'm not talking about runtime bindings here), so stupid mistakes are immediately caught.

For TCL, for example, which is truly interpreted, one needs a static checker to catch the same type of mistakes, and it's a reason I'm trying to avoid the language whenever possible.

FWIW, first Verilog implementations used P-code (I'm from VLSI world).

Well, this latest post of mine is OT, just wanted to make things clear.

...

If you are interested, I can demo my own Perl template engine here, it's very easy to use and open source. It can be really easily combined with any target language (C/C++, Verilog, Perl itself - you name it).
 
Old 09-23-2008, 06:09 PM   #63
lmenten
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sergei Steshenko View Post
Well, my point WRT compiled/interpreted is that Perl and the like first compile the whole code (I'm not talking about runtime bindings here), so stupid mistakes are immediately caught.

For TCL, for example, which is truly interpreted, one needs a static checker to catch the same type of mistakes, and it's a reason I'm trying to avoid the language whenever possible.

FWIW, first Verilog implementations used P-code (I'm from VLSI world).

Well, this latest post of mine is OT, just wanted to make things clear.

...

If you are interested, I can demo my own Perl template engine here, it's very easy to use and open source. It can be really easily combined with any target language (C/C++, Verilog, Perl itself - you name it).
I am interested. Sounds very cool.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 12:58 PM   #64
Sergei Steshenko
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Posts: 4,481

Rep: Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmenten View Post
I am interested. Sounds very cool.
Please see the thread I've opened: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...e-like-674387/
.
 
  


Reply

Tags
arm, c++, compile, fine, kernel, linux, modules


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linux kernel development vwal_13 Programming 3 03-09-2005 02:27 AM
Linux Device Driver Development aslv Linux - Certification 0 09-27-2004 08:42 AM
Linux Kernel Development impact on Slackware carboncopy Slackware 5 07-28-2004 03:43 PM
Touch screen driver development for Linux peso Linux - Software 1 02-02-2004 12:15 PM
Lexmark Released A Linux Driver Development Kit FearPasion710 Linux - Software 0 09-09-2003 06:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:58 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration