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Old 01-09-2003, 10:56 AM   #1
Flotilla
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any programmers who had to fight hard to learn to program?


Hello, I'm struggling with programming and am wondering if it's just not in my blood. Any programmers out there that had to struggle like this (blood, sweat, and tears, man)
I've already searched for good languages to start with, only language I can understand now is Basic (yup, sad)
 
Old 01-09-2003, 11:05 AM   #2
lackluster
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If you can understand BASIC, you can understand anything. All programming languages are the same at heart ... and it's important to remember that the language wants you to understand it, as opposed to most peoples train of thought that it is purposly cryptic.

If you're the kind of person who prefered legos over any other toy, or the kind of person that can build a bong from lettuce, then you were probably a born programmer.
 
Old 01-09-2003, 12:07 PM   #3
Flotilla
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After reading the Legos part I have renewed confidence in my future as a programmer! I was a lego maniac

I'll keep at it; perhaps I was looking at it as "purposely cryptic"

thanks for the reply
 
Old 01-09-2003, 04:24 PM   #4
NSKL
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Haha, i own 7 kilos of legos, yes seven kilos, two buckets!!!
Anyway Flotilla, we are in two (at least) but im starting to understand how things are working. After all it's like Math and Physics and art put together, it's beautiful to be able to make something from nothing using your skills.... Hehe, i almost mastered making simple calculators for now, but at the beggining i was desperate, then i changed approach and took it easy, and now things seem to be going much better. Dont give up!
-NSKL
 
Old 01-10-2003, 08:34 AM   #5
moeminhtun
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The start-up is very important in learning programming. If you start-up with a bad teacher or a bad book or a bad timing or whatever bad situation, most likely you would hate or afraid of programming.
In my school time, I saw a lot of my friends who never seen a program before went hate the programming when they started learning programming becuase of the above bad situation.
For me, I started up with the BASIC when i was teenage. I took a programming course and fortunately the teacher was damned good and all the way from then I'd never have a hard time learning programming before.
So it's important to take a good course or a good book or a good resource for the beginner.
 
Old 01-10-2003, 09:02 AM   #6
pperon
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any programmers who had to fight hard to learn to program?

HA! Yeah... everyday.

I had two bad experiences in college with two different teachers. Both taught programming and both were arrogant pricks. I then opted to teach myself and it's not easy. A lot of distractions and so on make learning a new language take FOREVER.

Anyway, yes it can be long, difficult work and often bittersweet but I feel the most important act is simply to program.

Remember that the language is just a tool not programming itself. You may be using a screwdriver (BASIC) right now but someday you'll move on to a Makita MForce 18V Cordless (C).
 
Old 01-10-2003, 09:33 AM   #7
Flotilla
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yeah, i think the interruptions play a big part also in my struggle with it...i'm gonna just lock myself with plenty of caffeine and junk food and have a cram session. Just disconnect from the world...maybe that's why some of my programming books start out with the first program being printing "Hello World!"

My little experience with programming teachers is that they sometimes know so much that they can't imagine knowing as little as I do
 
Old 01-11-2003, 11:11 AM   #8
chens_83
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cool...I think learning how to code will take time.. Hey if you are so insterested in making software why dont you take a short software course ? like in java or something. I think the OOP will lead you in good stead .... maybe. Java takes a lot of the hard stuff out of c++ and it will be a smaller stepping stone towards to c/c++
 
Old 01-11-2003, 12:31 PM   #9
Bert
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Whatever you do, don't be tempted to study it formally.

Keep doing it in your spare time, and create something worth looking at. Personally, I went down the route of seeking credibility for my skills, but it kills the hungry programmers instinct in you. Ask any consultant in the IT field and they'll tell you the same. To be a good programmer, you don't need maths, physics etc. (they help though) - what you need is motivation - wnat to do programming and enjoy the problem soloving bit and be a little reclusive.

Is that you?
 
Old 01-11-2003, 07:31 PM   #10
G.P.P.
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*lol*
..it'already said: keep fighting@all who try learning how to improove a prog

I started with BASIC at Commodore64 at the age of 9years, then i startet to use Assembler 'cause BASIC was too slow - as you can imagin when you ever tried a C64
Then i paused for 2 years til i was 14 and got a PC after hard time of annoying my parents *fg* ... and then i got to know DOS and BATCH etc. 'cause my windows95 was crashed (what else should id do)
..afterwards a freind of mine has shown me how to make a website or to use HtML... and i got interested in doc-description; on that way i got back to the root, found JScript, Java, Perl - and as long Perl was never my thing i tried C... C is DA BEST for learning to prog... you've C, you've the ability to include everything else also asm... and at the end i got to know MySQL some about 2 years ago and since then I used PHP, which is da best for the web-scripts i ever found.
Just try to get an idea.. a pretty simple at first.. prog your math-homework and develope it more and more... then try other ideas ... you'll find your way
my first prog (which was needed on C64) was: LOAD"$" ..yepp, without BASIC you've not been able to run anything on that computer - today it's pretty easy to use a PC but i think it's a petty that most users doan know anything about progging

Last edited by G.P.P.; 01-11-2003 at 09:50 PM.
 
Old 01-11-2003, 09:41 PM   #11
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I find it most satisfying to program when I'm doing something that I need or want to do (usually eliminating extra keystrokes and mouse clicking and user error). This is how I've learned what little I know. If I see something that can be automated, I'm thinking about how I can program it.
My first attempts were horribly buggy and hacked. Still, when more experienced programmers saw me trying, they were a lot more willing to spend time showing and teaching me stuff. Right now the only languages I'm proficient in are VB in the Windows environment and Python. Still, I've started messing with C++ and I'm a lot more confident now than when I wrote my first VB program.
Not every attempt at solving a problem is successful, but the more you try, the more you learn. If you're interested in programming and willing to put some effort into it, you're probably "cut out" for it.

CBT
 
Old 01-12-2003, 12:19 AM   #12
tundra
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yes. it's like learning to write with my left hand. or worse. and er... i don't know, maybe i'm unlucky, but all the programmers (and other genres of computer experts, charlatans and everything else u can find on the IT bandwagon) i've met are pretty cocky, so it's hard to find good help. everyone pretends to be a god, somehow.

in any case, i think Bert's right. fun is the best motivator. do something useful for yourself and it'll be get better everyday. the other thing is of course, to have a very hard boss who refuses to help you. necessity is one of the best taskmasters.
 
Old 01-16-2003, 08:37 PM   #13
macewan
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it's hard on this ole brain.
 
Old 01-21-2003, 05:14 AM   #14
coldascold
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Re: any programmers who had to fight hard to learn to program?

Quote:
Originally posted by Flotilla
Any programmers out there that had to struggle like this (blood, sweat, and tears, man)
Yep 18 hours a day! 3 years on I am getting somewhere, and those three years ago my inspiration only came from reading 5 lines in the docs of the O'riley WebSite Web server,(only docs I have read probley)
I ventured into Commercial Game programming as it combines 90% of computer knowledge into one software application.(No releases yet but very close (2years))---thats what they all say
However I still have this project I started 1 year ago which is not going very far and a rather large jump for someone who has just discovered that the 10mhz Apple computer is allot different than the software run on todays PC's..

-Never attempt professional training its a brain thing programming not a text book quiz.
Professional training my be good for exposer to stuff you don't have ie.Tomorrows space ship may cost 2 billion therefore exposer through education is feasible if you are after a text book career in 2 billion dollar space ships for freeway cruising

-Remember Expose you kids(if,when how,why) to technology whatever, and all you can give them as they will Dam thank you for it when they are myage
 
Old 01-21-2003, 07:49 AM   #15
macewan
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well said
 
  


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