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Old 11-04-2006, 09:00 PM   #1
Cara25
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Why no "root" login in 2007


Why can I not log in as "root" on my new install of 2007 ? Did I choose the wrong partition to install the MBR during the installation ?
 
Old 11-04-2006, 09:46 PM   #2
GlennsPref
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I don't know, I can't login as root either.

I have a feeling that the big knobs are trying to save us from rootkits and such.

One way around it is to open a root-konsole, from there type in the name of the program you want, ie. konqueror

And set it up for filemanager or web-view as you need.

If you find a way around your problem please post it on these pages.

Good luck
 
Old 11-05-2006, 04:12 AM   #3
reddazz
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For security reasons and to protect you from potentially damaging errors, many distros don't allow root logins using a login manager. Its a way of discouraging users from logging into KDE or any other X session as root. If you really need to login as root, you can tinker with your KDM settings i.e. Kcontrol -> System -> Login Manager. Personally I think its best to login as a normal user and switch to root in a terminal or use kdesu to run apps as root without actually logging into an X session as root.
 
Old 11-05-2006, 06:36 AM   #4
jolphil
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Hi,
I seem to remember that when I went to init3 an did a startx I wound up at root(red screen)..At least I think thats how it happened..
jolphil
 
Old 11-05-2006, 08:54 AM   #5
Cara25
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Thanks for the response everyone, I thought I had done something wrong. I can live without the root gui, I had just gotten used to using it while trying to troubleshoot software problems. I can see where it could cause serious damage to the OS.
Thanks !
Scott Nash
 
Old 11-09-2006, 12:10 AM   #6
vision master
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Go to "ETC/KDE/KDM" open the file KDMRC and change (Allowrootlogin=false) to
(Allowrootlogin=true)
 
Old 11-09-2006, 05:45 PM   #7
GlennsPref
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Smile Loging in as root

Thank you.

I like to feel like I'm living on the edge.

And also because I'm always tinkering with software configs.
 
Old 11-24-2006, 07:42 PM   #8
irlandes
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it's your computer...

Unlike those who tell you just how dangerous it is to log in as root, most of whom admit they have never done it -- so how do they know so much about it? -- I logged in as root for over two years, starting in 1999. Why? Mostly because I wanted to, period, and felt no need to seek permission from anyone. I was struggling pretty much alone trying to learn Linux, and if I had not logged in as root, would not be using Linux today.

At that time, Linux docs were useless. For a newbie working alone, it took hours just to figure out simple tasks. These cultists would have had me stop and take a week or two, just to learn how to do all needed tasks with su. That is ridiculous. I would have soon defenestrated Linux.

As a general statement, logging in as root is more common among newbies, who like me simply didn't know enough to handle what they are trying to do with su. It's not as easy as these guys would make you think. As one advances up the ladder of knowledge, learning to function as su should be a long-term goal.

Note very clearly that I am talking about use of your own computer in your own home, and you are going to pay for any damages, as unlikely as they are to occur. If you are using someone else's computer, a concept called fiduciary responsibility means you have a duty to use the safest techniques possible, even though severe damage is extremely rare, and even if it takes a lot longer.

Another warning: If you build your system in root, you can't even find most of your stuff as user, so either accept a root system, or only log in as root when you are swamped. Programs and data are stored in the log-in identity's personal folder, which for root is /root, and a user can't access that folder.

After being called a number of names by people who admit they have never logged in as root, but know all about it, I was, er, highly motivated to seek out the truth.

All I can say is, logging in as root makes linux more vulnerable when you are online, not as vulnerable as Windows, but more vulnerable than logging in as user. For those who want to be employed in Linux admin work, you can also be fired for incompetence for logging in as root, and probably should be, since advanced users don't need to do it.

I went to a security page, and asked there what the real risks were. All they could say is some mail lists had crackers who might tear you apart if you logged in there as root. See my comment about online loss of security.

Oh, yeah, they also said at one time a scanner program had a bug which would chew up your partition. That bug has been fixed.

And of course, if ever a serious Linux virus is created, logging in as user minimizes damage. If you wait for a Linux virus to attack your root system, you are in for a long wait.

I went to ShieldsUp, and ran a scan, in user with firewall. No open ports. I logged in as root, turned off the firewall. Still no open ports. That was before SP1 on XP, and when I checked it, a lot of ports were wide open. Not now, of course.

Another argument is that su keeps you from making mistakes. I have had for several years now a standing challenge, one I am not sure of, because I am not going to try it. Log in as user, su, then type:

rm -fd /* <enter>

and let us know what happened. I am not sure of this command, because I haven't tried it because I am confident I wouldn't like the results. But, if you are sure that su keeps you from damaging your computer, put your HD where your mouth is.

The truth is, logging in as user gives you maximum security. Logging in as root gives you less security, but especially when you are online. That is pretty much it. If it is your own private computer, and you think you have a reason to log in as root, log away. If it is your friend's or your boss's computer, then a concept called 'fiduciary responsibility' says you are getting paid by the hour to log in as user, or are not taking financial responsibility, do it even if it takes longer.

So, why all the fuss, and certain personalities trying to force their personal beliefs on others? Well, cults always have their items of faith, which if you don't believe you will be persecuted out of your skin. Some cults tell you if you drink the nice Kool-Aid(tm) you will reach Nirvana. Others require you to say, "Praise God!" as part of any conversation. Others require you to let your wife sleep with the Prophet.

In Linux, the cult mantra is "logging in as root is worse than raping babies."

After I spent several years learning Linux, okay, so I'm slow, when I bought my next computer, I started out logging in as user. I gradually learned how to do most tasks from su. In the end, I think as you become an advanced user, you will also want to learn to do most things as user. And, for sure, if you wish to work as a Linux pro, that is part of your qualification for employment.

One of the last things I needed to log in as root for, was to delete folders. I finally learned about the -d option of rm. It was there all the time, but I kept overlooking it. Sounds dumb, I know, but a lot of folks don't know everything handy.

Part of the problem is those who cuss and fuss about logging in as root, usually don't give a lot of help doing things in su.

Here is a tip. If you, for example, want to run Konqueror as root, right click on an icon (you can add an icon on KDE specially for this) --> Properties --> Application --> Advanced Options --> Run as different User

Click on the box, type in root, when you open it via icon it will demand root password. Be sure to rename that icon as Konqueror Super User.

Note that you cannot open a terminal from a root Konqueror window menu.

You can make almost any icon into a super user application by the same method.

I for one, though I no longer do much system dinking so don't log in much as root, will not install knowingly any distro whose producer is so arrogant he has made this decision for me. (e.g. -- Knoppix.) This is a matter of principle. We are told Linux is about choice. Well, if I feel like logging in as root on my personal computer, that is my choice. And, for Klaus Knopper or the Mandriva team to attempt to take away my choice is intolerable. If I wanted to be told what to do, I'd be on hda1 with the Virus Sponge.
 
Old 12-08-2006, 02:33 AM   #9
Emmanuel_uk
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There are all sort of options re root login
that can be accessed by running draksec
 
Old 12-08-2006, 02:33 AM   #10
Emmanuel_uk
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oops sorry browser slow and error double post

Last edited by Emmanuel_uk; 12-08-2006 at 02:35 AM.
 
Old 12-11-2006, 10:01 AM   #11
tur third
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I think this will be affected by what you chose when installing 2007. Didn't it ask about security setting. I lowered mine from 'strong' to 'normal' (or something like that).

I am almost certain I can log in to KDE as root (with the red screen). However I will check later.
 
Old 06-14-2007, 11:42 AM   #12
ragavendra_bn
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Smile Root login Knoppix

When the login screen pops up you give 'console login'. The console opens up. Login as root there. Give the 'startx' command, you are the root.

Enjoy

Raagu
 
Old 06-16-2007, 04:53 PM   #13
tytower
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reddazz
For security reasons and to protect you from potentially damaging errors, many distros don't allow root logins using a login manager. Its a way of discouraging users from logging into KDE or any other X session as root. If you really need to login as root, you can tinker with your KDM settings i.e. Kcontrol -> System -> Login Manager. Personally I think its best to login as a normal user and switch to root in a terminal or use kdesu to run apps as root without actually logging into an X session as root.
[Mod Note] I have removed the insulting and completely off-topic bits from this post.

Last edited by XavierP; 06-17-2007 at 04:34 AM.
 
Old 06-17-2007, 04:35 AM   #14
XavierP
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tytower - I don't know what your problem with Reddazz is, but do not address any moderator, any member, in that way ever again on LQ.
 
Old 06-18-2007, 05:27 PM   #15
tytower
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XavierP
tytower - I don't know what your problem with Reddazz is, but do not address any moderator, any member, in that way ever again on LQ.
[Mod Note]All of this post has been removed

Last edited by XavierP; 06-18-2007 at 05:34 PM.
 
  


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