LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Mandriva
User Name
Password
Mandriva This Forum is for the discussion of Mandriva (Mandrake) Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-26-2004, 08:36 AM   #1
Solstice
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Unhappy Kernel source tree ...


Hi

First of all I should say that I'm a complete newbie when it comes to Linux, having done my first ever installation yesterday.

I seem to have a problem though. I can't get my linux machine connected to my network. I've come to the conclusion that the drivers for my network card are not installed...

So, I downloaded the correct drivers (bcm4400-3.0.7) and have followed instructions for both a Source RPM package install and building the driver from a TAR file. I keep getting the same error though "Linux kernel source tree not found".

Im using Mandrake 9.2 (3cd distro downloaded from linux-mandrake). I know I'll have to install the kernel source tree somehow, but being a newbie to Linux I'm completely stumped as to how to do this.

Is there someone out there who can let me know exactly what I need to do, step by step to get past this error?

thanks in advance

Solstice
 
Old 01-26-2004, 08:40 AM   #2
kasperhans
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: right behind the moon
Distribution: gentoo
Posts: 466

Rep: Reputation: 30
hmm no i think you dont have the kernel source tree installed get into your shell and have a look at the following dirs: /usr/src/linux /usr/src
are there any directories named linux- ?
if not perform a whereis kernel if it doesnt find anything get your kernel version this can be done by just having a look at the boot messages or by performing a dmesg in your shell . Then get the right source for your kernel version should be avaible on the mandrake cd or ftp and try again
have fun
 
Old 01-26-2004, 08:56 AM   #3
Solstice
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
No, no directories named 'linux'. Nothing returned from 'whereis kernel'. I think I have my kernel version (2.4.22-10mdk ???).

What am I looking for on the cd (I have 3 cd's btw)? And what do I need to do with it when I've found it?

Sorry to be a pain but I'm completely new to linux.
 
Old 01-26-2004, 05:14 PM   #4
el_pajaro!
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Ecuador
Distribution: Debian, Ubuntu, Elastix
Posts: 183

Rep: Reputation: 30
Try going to Mandrake Control Center and then to the software package management. Search for the kernel and you would find the rpm that installs the source of the kernel. That is the way I use to do it with Mandrake 9.1, and then I had the kernel source at /usr/src/linux.
I just installed the download version fo Mandrake 9.2 and try to do the same but it didn't work. I have no idea where the kernel source is installed.

After this you would have to compile the kernel.

Solstice give it a try hope it works for you.
 
Old 10-05-2004, 10:29 AM   #5
alone_frank
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Brasov/Romania
Distribution: redhat 9
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
you can try this ...

I was experince the same problem and .... it works now )
This 2 files comes with the broadcom netextrem gigabit driver
!!!!!!Thank you very much Broadcom tech-support!!!!!!
!!!!Shame on HP Support ( evo d530 desktop comes with a broadcom netextrem gigabit network card)!!!!!
**************************************
Readme.txt :
Installation Notes
Broadcom BCM5700 Linux Driver
Copyright (c) 2000-2004 Broadcom Corporation
All rights reserved


Table of Contents
=================

Introduction
Limitations
Packaging
Installing Source RPM Package
Building Driver From TAR File
Patching Driver Into Kernel
Unloading and Removing Driver
Module Parameters
Driver Messages
Statistics


Introduction
============

This file describes the Linux driver for the Broadcom NetXtreme BCM5700
series 10/100/1000 Mbps PCI/PCI-X/PCI Express Ethernet Network Controllers.


Limitations
===========

The current version of the driver has been tested on the latest Red Hat, SuSE,
and United Linux distributions, as well as other similar Linux distributions
for i386, ia64, and x86_64 CPU architectures using 2.4.x and 2.6.x kernels. The
driver has been tested up to kernel version 2.4.26 and 2.6.7.

The driver should work on other little endian or big endian CPU architectures,
but only very limited testing has been done on some of these machines. The
Makefile may have to be modified to include architecture specific compile
switches, and some minor changes in the source files may also be required.
On these machines, patching the driver into the kernel is recommended (see
below for instructions).


Packaging
=========

The driver is released in two packaging formats: source RPM and compressed tar
formats. The file names for the two packages are bcm5700-<version>.src.rpm and
bcm5700-<version>.tar.gz respectively. Identical source files to build the
driver are included in both packages. The tar file contains additional
utilities such as patches and driver diskette images for network installation.


Installing Source RPM Package
=============================

The following are general guidelines for installing the driver. Refer to
DISTRIB.TXT for additional installation notes for various Linux distributions.

1. Install the source RPM package:

rpm -ivh bcm5700-<version>.src.rpm

2. CD to the RPM path and build the binary driver for your kernel:

cd /usr/src/{redhat,OpenLinux,turbo,packages,rpm ..}

rpm -bb SPECS/bcm5700.spec

or

rpmbuild -bb SPECS/bcm5700.spec (for RPM version 4.x.x)

Note that the RPM path is different for different Linux distributions.

3. Install the newly built package (driver and man page):

rpm -ivh RPMS/i386/bcm5700-<version>.i386.rpm

Note that the --force option is needed if installing on Red Hat 7.2, 7.3,
2.1AS and others that already contain an older version of the driver.

The driver will be installed in the following path:

2.2.x kernels:

/lib/modules/<kernel_version>/net/bcm5700.o

2.4.x kernels:

/lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/net/bcm5700.o

2.4.x kernels with bcm5700 as an addon driver (e.g. Red Hat 7.3, 2.1AS):

/lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/net/bcm/bcm5700.o

or

/lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/addon/bcm5700/bcm5700.o

2.6.0 kernels:

/lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/net/bcm5700.ko

4. Load the driver:

insmod bcm5700
or
modprobe bcm5700

If loading the driver on Red Hat 7.3, 2.1 AS or other newer kernels with the
tg3 driver, refer to the "Removing tg3 Driver" in DISTRIB.TXT before loading
the driver.

5. To configure network protocol and address, refer to various Linux
documentations.


Building Driver From TAR File
=============================

The following are general guidelines for installing the driver. Refer to
DISTRIB.TXT for additional installation notes for various Linux distributions.

1. Create a directory and extract the files:

tar xvzf bcm5700-<version>.tar.gz

2. Build the driver bcm5700.o as a loadable module for the running kernel:

cd src
make

3. Test the driver by loading it:

insmod bcm5700.o
or
insmod bcm5700.ko (on 2.6.x kernels)

If loading the driver on Red Hat 7.3, 2.1 AS or other newer kernels with the
tg3 driver, refer to the "Removing tg3 Driver" in DISTRIB.TXT before loading
the driver.

4. Install the driver and man page:

make install

See RPM instructions above for the location of the installed driver.

5. To configure network protocol and address, refer to various Linux
documentations.


Patching Driver Into Kernel (Optional)
======================================

Patch files are included for patching the driver into some of the latest
2.4.x kernel source trees. This step is optional and should only be done
by users familiar with configuring and building the kernel. The patch
will modify the orginal kernel's source code.

Follow the following steps to patch the driver into kernel:

1. Select the patch file that matches your kernel and apply the patch:

patch -p1 -d <kernel_src_root> < bcm5700-<version>-2.4.<x>.patch

where <version> is the version of the bcm5700 driver and 2.4.<x> is the
version of the kernel to patch (e.g. 2.4.10).

Note: <kernel_src_root> is usually /usr/src/linux or /usr/src/linux-2.4.<x>

2. Configure the kernel to include the bcm5700 driver. It can be found
under Network Device Support ---> Ethernet (1000 Mbit) ---> Broadcom BCM5700
support when make menuconfig is run. Select built-in or module for the driver:

cd <kernel_src_root>
make menuconfig

3. Compile the kernel:

make dep
make clean
....
....


Unloading and Removing Driver
=============================

To unload the driver, use ifconfig to bring down all eth# interfaces opened
by the driver, then do the following:

rmmod bcm5700


If the driver was installed using rpm, do the following to remove it:

rpm -e bcm5700


If the driver was installed using make install from the tar file, the driver
bcm5700.o has to be manually deleted from the system. Refer to the section
"Installing Source RPM Package" for the location of the installed driver.


Module Parameters
=================

Optional parameters for the driver can be supplied as command line arguments
to the insmod command. Typically, these parameters are set in the file
/etc/modules.conf (see the man page for modules.conf). These parameters take
the form

<parameter>=value[,value,...]

where the multiple values for the same parameter are for multiple NICs
installed in the system.

Note that default or other meaningful values will be used when invalid values
are selected. Some combinations of parameter values may conflict and lead to
failures. The driver cannot detect all such conflicting combinations.

All the parameters are listed below.

line_speed

Selects the line speed of the link. This parameter is used together with
full_duplex and auto_speed to select the speed and duplexity of the link
and the setting of autonegotiation.

The valid values are:

0 Autonegotiate for highest speed supported by link partner (default)
10 10 Mbps
100 100 Mbps
1000 1000 Mbps

If line_speed is set to 10, 100, or 1000, the NIC will autonegotiate for
the selected speed (and selected duplexity) if auto_speed is set to 1.
If auto_speed is set to 0, the selected speed and duplexity will be
set without autonegotiation. Note that 1000 Mbps must be negotiated for
copper twisted pair links.

auto_speed

Enables or disables autonegotiation. The valid values are:

0 Autonegotiation disabled
1 Autonegotiation enabled (default)

Note that this parameter is ignored and assumed 1 if line_speed is set
to 0.

full_duplex

Selects the duplexity of the link. This paramter is used together with
line_speed to select the speed and duplexity of the link. Note that this
parameter is ignored if line_speed is 0.

The valid values are:

0 half duplex
1 full duplex (default)


rx_flow_control

Enables or disables receiving flow control (pause) frames. This parameter
is used together with auto_flow_control. The valid values are:

0 pause receive disabled
1 pause receive enabled if auto_flow_control is set to 0, or
pause receive advertised if auto_flow_control is set to 1 (default)

tx_flow_control

Enables or disables transmitting flow control (pause) frames. This parameter
is used together with auto_flow_control. The valid values are:

0 pause transmit disabled
1 pause transmit enabled if auto_flow_control is set to 0, or
pause transmit advertised if auto_flow_control is set to 1 (default)

auto_flow_control

Enables or disables autonegotiation of flow control. This parameter is used
together with rx_flow_control and tx_flow_control to determine the
advertised flow control capability. The valid values are:

0 flow control autonegotiation disabled
1 flow control autonegotiation enabled with capability specified in
rx_flow_control and tx_flow_control (only valid if line_speed is
set to 0 or auto_speed is set to 1) (default)

mtu

Enables jumbo frames up to the specified MTU size. The valid range for
this parameter is 1500 to 9000. Default is 1500 which is standard
ethernet (non-jumbo) MTU size. Note that the MTU size excludes the
ethernet header size of 14 bytes. Actual frame size is MTU size + 14 bytes.
Jumbo MTU sizes are not supported on BCM5705 chips.

The MTU size can also be changed using ifconfig after the driver is loaded.
See the ifconfig man page for details.

tx_checksum

Enables or disables hardware transmit TCP/UDP checksum. The valid values
are:

0 checksum disabled
1 checksum enabled (default)

rx_checksum

Enables or disables hardware receive TCP/UDP checksum validation. The
valid values are:

0 checksum disabled
1 checksum enabled (default)

scatter_gather

Enables or disables scatter-gather and 64-bit DMA on x86. This option is
only useful when running on TUX-enabled kernels or newer kernels with
zero-copy TCP. The valid values are:

0 scatter-gather and 64-bit DMA on x86 disabled
1 scatter-gather and 64-bit DMA on x86 enabled (default)

nic_tx_bd

Enables either NIC based or host based transmit buffer descriptors (Tx BDs).
NIC based Tx BDs may be slightly faster on certain machines on earlier
2.4 kernels where each transmit packet is usually entirely contiguous. On
later kernels with scatter-gather and TCP segmentation option, host based
Tx BDs using DMA transfer are usually faster. NIC based Tx BDs are not
supported on 5705 family controllers. The valid values are:

0 NIC based transmit buffer descriptors disabled (using host based
transmit buffer descriptors) (default)
1 NIC based transmit buffer descriptors enabled (not supported
on 5705 family controllers)

tx_pkt_desc_cnt

Configures the number of transmit descriptors. Default is 120. The
valid range is from 1 to 511. Note that the driver may not be able to
allocate the required amount of memory if this parameter is set too high.
Depending on kernel and CPU architecture, each descriptor may require up
to about 268 bytes. This parameter should not be set less than 80 if
adaptive_coalesce (see below) is enabled.

rx_std_desc_cnt

Configures the number of receive descriptors for frames up to 1528 bytes.
Default is 200. The valid range is from 1 to 511. This parameter should
not be set less than 80 on systems with high network traffic. Setting this
parameter higher allows the NIC to buffer larger bursts of network
traffic without dropping frames, especially on slower systems. Note that
the driver may not be able to allocate the required amount of memory if
this parameter is set too high. Depending on kernel and CPU architecture,
each descriptor may require up to about 268 bytes. Each descriptor also
requires a socket buffer of at least 1536 bytes. This parameter should not
be set less than 50 if adaptive_coalesce (see below) is enabled.

rx_jumbo_desc_cnt

Configures the number of receive descriptors for jumbo frames larger
than 1528 bytes. Default is 128 and valid range is from 1 to 255.
When jumbo frames larger than 1528 bytes are used, this parameter should
not be set lower than 60 on systems with high network traffic. Setting
this parameter higher allows the NIC to buffer larger bursts of jumbo
traffic without dropping frames, especially on slower systems. Depending
on kernel and CPU architecture, each descriptor may require up to about
268 bytes. Each descriptor also requires a socket buffer the size of a
maximum jumbo frame. On systems with insufficient memory, it may be
necessary to reduce this parameter. This parameter should not be set less
than 50 if adaptive_coalesce (see below) is enabled. When the maximum
frame size is 1528 or smaller (MTU size 1514 or smaller), this parameter
is not used and is always 0.

adaptive_coalesce

Enables or disables adaptive adjustments to the various interrupt
coalescing parameters. Enabling it allows the driver to dynamically
adjust the interrupt coalescing parameters to achieve high throughput
during heavy traffic and low latency during light traffic.
rx_std_desc_cnt, (and rx_jumbo_desc_cnt if using jumbo frames) should not
be set less than 50, and tx_pkt_desc_cnt should not be set less than 80
when this parameter is enabled. Note that if the kernel supports the NAPI
receive polling mode, interrupt coalescing will be handled in a different
way and this parameter will not be used. The valid values are:

0 disabled (always disabled in NAPI mode)
1 enabled (default)

rx_coalesce_ticks

Configures the number of 1 usec ticks before the NIC generates receive
interrupt after receiving a frame. This parameter works in conjunction
with the rx_max_coalesce_frames parameter. Interrupt will be generated
when either of these thresholds is exceeded. 0 means this parameter is
ignored and interrupt will be generated when the rx_max_coalesce_frames
threshold is reached. The valid range is from 0 to 500, and default is
60 (18 if using NAPI mode). This parameter is not used and will be
adjusted automatically if adaptive_coalesce is set to 1.

rx_max_coalesce_frames

Configures the number of received frames before the NIC generates receive
interrupt. The valid range is from 0 to 100, and default is 15 (6 if using
NAPI mode). This parameter and rx_coalesce_ticks cannot be both 0,
otherwise no receive interrupts will be generated. It should also be set
lower than rx_std_desc_cnt (and rx_jumbo_desc_cnt if using jumbo frames).
This parameter is not used and will be adjusted automatically if
adaptive_coalesce is set to 1.

tx_coalesce_ticks

Configures the number of 1 usec ticks before the NIC generates transmit
interrupt after transmitting a frame. This parameter works in conjunction
with the tx_max_coalesce_frames parameter. Interrupt will be generated
when either of these thresholds is exceeded. 0 means this
parameter is ignored and interrupt will be generated when the
tx_max_coalesce_frames threshold is reached. The valid range is from 0 to
500, and default is 200. This parameter is not used and will be adjusted
automatically if adaptive_coalesce is set to 1.

tx_max_coalesce_frames

Configures the number of transmitted frames before the NIC generates
transmit interrupt. The valid range is from 0 to 100, and default is 35.
This parameter and tx_coalesce_ticks cannot be both 0, otherwise no
transmit completion interrupt will be generated. This parameter should
always be set lower than tx_pkt_desc_cnt. This parameter is not used and
will be adjusted automatically if adaptive_coalesce is set to 1.

stats_coalesce_ticks

Configures the number of 1 usec ticks between periodic statistics block
DMAs. The valid range is from 100 to 3600000000, and default is 1000000
(1 sec.). 0 is also valid and is used to disable statistics updates.
This parameter is not used and will be set to default if adaptive_coalesce
is set to 1.

enable_wol

Enables or disables magic packet Wake-On-LAN when the system is shutdown.
Note that not all systems support Wake-On-LAN. The valid values are:

0 magic packet Wake-On-LAN disabled (default)
1 magic packet Wake-On-LAN enabled

enable_tso

Enables or disables TCP Segmentation Option (TSO) when using kernels that
support it. This parameter is only defined on newer kernels that support
TSO. The valid values are:

0 TSO disabled
1 TSO enabled (default)

vlan_tag_mode

This parameter controls the stripping of VLAN tags on incoming packets,
and is used to allow VLAN tagged ASF or IPMI packets to be received
properly. The valid values are:

0 Auto mode (default)
1 Normal strip mode
2 Forced strip mode

In normal mode, VLAN tags are only stripped if VLANs are registered
by the 802.1q VLAN module or BASP. In forced strip mode, VLAN tags
are always stripped. Auto mode will select normal strip mode if ASF/IPMI
is disabled, or forced strip mode if ASF/IPMI is enabled.

delay_link

If set to 1, this parameter will cause the driver to return
-EOPNOTSUPP when the SIOCGMIIREG or ETHTOOL_GLINK ioctls are called
during the first 6 seconds after driver reset. When the driver resets
the NIC during ifconfig, the link will drop and it may take several
seconds for the link to come up after autonegotiation completes. Some
applications, such as ifup, may not wait long enough for the link
before giving up. Setting this parameter to 1 may get around such
problems. The default value is 0, which means that the driver will
always return true link states to all ioctl calls, when applicable.

disable_d3hot

If set to 1, this parameter will cause the driver to never
put the device in D3Hot power state when the NIC is shutdown or
suspended. If set, this parameter will also disable the Wake-On-Lan
setting. A rare D3Hot related problem was seen during repeated
shutdown of PCI Express devices on systems running 2.6 kernels.

Driver Messages
===============

The following are the most common sample messages that may be logged in the file
/var/log/messages. Use dmesg -n <level> to control the level at which messages
will appear on the console. Most systems are set to level 6 by default.

Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Driver bcm5700 with Broadcom NIC Extension (NICE)
ver. 7.3.5 (06/23/04)

Driver signon


eth#: Broadcom BCM5704 1000Base-T found at mem faff0000, IRQ 16, node addr
0010180402d8
eth#: Broadcom BCM5704 Integrated Copper transceiver found
eth#: Scatter-gather ON, 64-bit DMA ON, Tx Checksum ON, Rx Checksum ON, 802.1Q VLAN ON, TSO ON, NAPI ON

NIC detected


bcm5700: eth# NIC Link is Up, 1000 Mbps full duplex, receive and transmit flow control ON

Link up and speed indication


bcm5700: eth# NIC Link is Down

Link down indication


Statistics
==========

Detailed statistics and configuration information can be viewed in the file
/proc/net/nicinfo/eth#.info.
 
Old 10-05-2004, 10:30 AM   #6
alone_frank
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Brasov/Romania
Distribution: redhat 9
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
you can try this ... part2

***************************************************



**************************************************
Distrib.txt
Copyright (c) 2000-2004 Broadcom Corporation
All rights reserved


Table of Contents
=================

Introduction
Limitations
Prerequisites
Prepare Kernel Source Tree (United Linux 1.0 Distributions)
Enable Loadable Module Support on Turbolinux 10
Prepare Cross-Compiler and Kernel Source Tree on ppc64 (SuSE SLES8 ppc)
Remove tg3 Driver
Edit /etc/modules.conf
Patching PCI Files (Red Hat - Optional)
Patching module-info Files (Red Hat - Optional)
Network Installation (Red Hat)


Introduction
============

This file contains additional installation notes for the Broadcom NetXtreme
bcm5700 Linux driver that are specific to certain Linux distributions. General
installation notes are contained in README.TXT.


Limitations
===========

The current version of the driver has been tested on selected Linux
distributions for i386, ia64, and x86_64. Limited testing has also
been done on PPC64 systems. Testing is normally focused on the
following distributions:

Red Hat 9.0, 2.1AS and 3.0EL
SuSE 9.0 and SLES8
UnitedLinux 1.0
Mandrake 9.2


Prerequisites
=============

In order to compile your Broadcom NetXtreme Linux driver, you must first
have a properly compiled kernel source tree which matches your running
kernel. You must also have a working C/C++ compiler and all the associated
dependencies installed before attempting to compile the driver.

On Red Hat distributions, if you have opted for a custom installation, you
need to select "Development Tools" and "Kernel Development" to install
the necessary tools and kernel source tree.

On United Linux based distributions, you must change the software packages
installed by default when presented with the Installation Settings. Under
software selelction, select "Detailed Selection". In this area ensure that
"C/C++ Compiler and Tools" is selected. This should install the C/C++
compiler as well as the kernel-source files.

For further assistance, please review your Linux documentation.


Prepare Kernel Source Tree (United Linux 1.0 Distributions)
===========================================================

The following instructions pertain only to United Linux 1.0 based
distributions (SuSE 8.x, SCO4.0, etc.) These steps are not
needed for Red Hat, Mandrake and other similar distributions.

1. Prepare the kernel source tree. These steps may be necessary in order to
compile a driver that will match your running kernel.

cd /usr/src/linux-<kernel_version>.SuSE
cp /boot/vmlinuz.config .config
cp /boot/vmlinuz.version.h include/linux/version.h
cp /boot/vmlinuz.autoconf.h include/linux/autoconf.h
make oldconfig
make dep

2. Now build and install the Broadcom Linux driver using either the rpm or
tar archive installation files. The procedures are found in README.TXT.


Enable Loadable Module Support on Turboilinux 10
================================================

When attempting to compile the driver, the following message may be displayed:

The present kernel configuration has modules disabled. Type 'make config'
and enable loadable module support. Then build a kernel with module
support enabled.

Do the following to enable loadable module support:

cp /usr/src/configs/kernel-x.x.x-i586.config /usr/src/.config


Prepare Cross-Compiler and Kernel Source Tree on ppc64 (SuSE SLES8 ppc)
=======================================================================

1. Install the kernel source tree (e.g. 2.4.21-111-pseries64).

2. Install the ppc64 cross-compile binutils.

3. cd to the Linux kernel source directory (e.g. /usr/src/linux)

4. Edit the top level kernel Makefile and change the CROSS_COMPILE variable
to:

CROSS_COMPILE=/opt/cross/bin/powerpc64-linux-

(Verify that this is the correct path to the cross-compile binutils)

5. Run the following to prepare the kernel source tree:

make distclean
cp arch/ppc64/defconfig.pseries .config
make oldconfig
make dep

6. Now build and install the Broadcom Linux driver using either the rpm or
tar archive installation files. The procedures are found in README.TXT.


Remove tg3 Driver
=================

Many newer distributions and newer kernels may already contain and use the
tg3 driver by default for Broadcom BCM5700 series devices. While tg3 is a fully
functioning driver written by Red Hat, Broadcom recommends users to use
the bcm5700 driver written and tested by Broadcom.

1. Use ifconfig to bring down all interfaces used by tg3, then use `rmmod` to
remove the module if loaded. The following assumes eth0 and eth1 are both
Broadcom devices using the tg3 driver.

ifconfig eth0 down
ifconfig eth1 down
rmmod tg3

2. Now it may be necessary to manually edit your /etc/modules.conf file to
allow the bcm5700 driver to load at boot time instead of the tg3 driver. See
below.


Edit /etc/modules.conf
======================

If there is an alias entry in your /etc/modules.conf file referencing the
tg3 driver, make sure that you replace tg3 with bcm5700. Otherwise, add the
entry below if necessary.

Example:

alias eth0 bcm5700


Patching PCI Files (Red Hat - Optional)
=======================================

To use the Red Hat kudzu hardware detection utility, and to list the
BCM5700 series devices using lspci, a number of files containing PCI vendor
and device information need to be patched with information on the BCM5700
series NICs. Patch files for Red Hat some of the latest Red Hat distributions
are included. Apply the appropriate patch by running the patch command.
For example, on Red Hat 9.0 for i386, apply the patch by doing the following:

patch -N -p1 -d /usr < pci-rh90-i386.patch

Run kudzu:

kudzu


Patching module-info Files (Red Hat - Optional)
===============================================

To use Red Hat's graphical network administration tool neat, the module-info
files need to be patched. Apply the appropriate patch by running the patch
command. For example, on Red Hat 8.0 for i386, apply the patch by doing the
following:

patch -N -p1 -d /boot < modinfo-rh80-i386.patch

Run neat:

neat


Network Installation (Red Hat)
==============================

For network installations through NFS, FTP, or HTTP (using a network boot disk
or PXE), a driver diskette that contains the bcm5700 driver is needed. The
driver diskette images for the most recent Red Hat versions are included. Boot
drivers for other Linux versions can be compiled by modifying the Makefile and
the make environment. Further information is available from Red Hat's website.

To create the driver diskette, select the appropriate image file, gunzip it,
and do the following:

dd if=dd.img of=/dev/fd0H1440.




 
Old 10-05-2004, 01:30 PM   #7
nafan
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: /dev/bed
Distribution: Mandriva 2009.0 Powerpack
Posts: 172

Rep: Reputation: 30
Find out what kernel version is running on your machine by opening a terminal and typing uname -r
for example, on my system.....
Code:
[poohbear@server poohbear]$ uname -r
2.6.7
Your system may tell you 2.6.3-7mdk or something similar.
To install the kernel source in Mandrake 10, start the Mandrake Control Centre and open the 'Install' icon under Software managment. Look for a package named kernel-source that ends in the same kernel version as uname -r reported. on my system it would be kernel-source-2.6.7. Select the appropriate source package and click the install button. This will put a copy of the source code for your kernel under /usr/src/linux-versionnumber, with a link to /usr/src/linux, so that you don't need to remember the version number.

You won't need to actually compile a new kernel, but you will need it configured properly. In your terminal program, change to the kernel source directory, and type the commands that are red below.
Code:
[poohbear@server poohbear]$ cd /usr/src/linux
[poohbear@server linux]$ make clean mrproper
[poohbear@server linux]$ make oldconfig
[poohbear@server linux]$
A lot of text will scroll past as the build scripts configure the kernel source code using the configuration of your running kernel. When that's all done and you get a prompt back, follow the steps for building your network card driver.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how to integrate driver source into kernel source tree zhchang Linux - Software 5 11-23-2005 01:34 AM
Kernel Source Tree? raxxal Fedora 1 04-07-2005 06:14 PM
where is kernel source tree ? overproof Mandriva 2 04-07-2005 04:28 PM
where is linux source build directory/kernel source tree? webazoid Linux - Software 2 07-01-2004 09:37 PM
no kernel source tree?? adambeazley Linux - Wireless Networking 3 04-22-2004 06:25 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:12 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration