LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Mandriva
User Name
Password
Mandriva This Forum is for the discussion of Mandriva (Mandrake) Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-25-2007, 02:32 PM   #1
archive
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: EU (GR)
Distribution: Mandriva 2007, Ubuntu 6.10
Posts: 15

Rep: Reputation: 0
Installed, impressed, confused (basic concepts question)


Hi all!

I finished mandriva_ONE_2007 installation an hour ago, which was the first time to see linux screen(!), and have to admit that i'm quite impressed, having heard about LINUX systems' "user unfriendliness"!
But I guess the hard part starts now...

Note that the choice of the mandriva distribution was made on the basis of unsuccessfull installation attempts with: 1.Kubuntu, 2.Fedora, 3.Dreamlinux (all crashed at various points of installation).

(Back to mandriva)
Anyway, I'm already happy with:

1. Smooth installation (as smooth as MS win***s, but waaay quicker!)
2. All devices, instantly recognized (no drivers problems)
3. Successful setup of DSL connection
4. Package for TV cards (intuitive, fast, already works!)

My Concerns:

From the first moment i realized that the toughest thing on a linux system, (for a traditional windows user) is to comprehend the file structure and extensions.

1. Why is linux partitioning the HD into 3 partitions?
2. Is .tar.gz and .rpm the equivalent of windows' .exe?
3. Is there also a package for radio as well? (i have a TV/radio card)
4. How can I change the default font size of firefox? (always too small, and i always have to ctrl++)
5. At the moment i have disconnected my windows harddisk, and another with madriva is running.
Would it be safe to connect both (win=master, linux=slave) and choose from BIOS which device to boot at any time(?), or is linux going to mess with the windows hd, and windows with linux hd?
I have to figure this out, as in the painful process of transitioning, i'll probably have to use both systems.

Thank you all,
and i really hope to become a regular member of the linux community.
 
Old 03-25-2007, 03:28 PM   #2
Unknown_User
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: EU (UK)
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.x, Fedora 9, OpenSuSE 11.3, Mythbuntu (Don't know it? Try - it rocks!)
Posts: 225

Rep: Reputation: 30
Don't try to work out the Linux filesystem from the point of view of Windows, they are radically different. Linux sees absolutely everything as a file and as such cannot be directly compared.

For my money Linux filesystems are more robust and efficient.

You could consider that Windows has divisons on your hard drive it's just that they are hidden from you. (Such as the swap file area)

.tar.gz is more like .zip

.rpm is like .msi

No idea on radio software. Absolutely must be. Google it.

Alt & + or - for Firefox fonts.

You won't be able to boot into Windows/Linux by simply attaching them to your motherboard. Whichever takes the primary SATA/IDE channel will boot up. Only Linux will then see your Windows drives.

If you install a boot loader such as GRUB or LILO you will have a splash screen that will ask you if you want to boot to either. It can be a bit tricky, the larger Linux distributions tend to include them when you install.

Check out http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/ but be careful! Installing incorrectly can leave you struggling to get in to you OS and rescue requires expertise.

Good to have you on board. Keep at it and dont be tempted to throw in the Microsoft towel!
 
Old 03-25-2007, 03:40 PM   #3
Thomas Lemmens
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: European Union (BE)
Distribution: Ubuntu, Slackware
Posts: 49

Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by archive
Hi all!

Why is linux partitioning the HD into 3 partitions?
This is the meaning of these three partitions in standard mandriva install, compared to windows:
1: "/" =partition where your system and your programs are residing (= "windows" dir AND "program files" dir in windows)
2: "/home" =the partition where your personal data and personal config files are residing (= "My Documents" dir AND "Documents and Settings" dir in windows)
3/ "swap" =partition used to add virtual (disk) memory to your standard physical (chip) memory = "virtual memory" in windows

In standard Mandriva install the /home partition is separated from the / partition because this separation makes it possible to reinstall your linux system without losing your personal files.
The swap partition is always separated for file and system security reasons.

Last edited by Thomas Lemmens; 03-26-2007 at 10:24 AM.
 
Old 03-25-2007, 03:50 PM   #4
Perdix
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Bristol
Distribution: openSUSE 10.2
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0
I am mainly a Windows user as well, but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknown_User
Don't try to work out the Linux filesystem from the point of view of Windows, they are radically different. Linux sees absolutely everything as a file and as such cannot be directly compared.

For my money Linux filesystems are more robust and efficient.
You do get used to it fairly quickly, and I personally love how organised it is (Windows just has stuff installed all over the place).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknown_User
1: "/" =partition where your system and your programs are residing (= "windows" dir AND "program files" dir in windows)
2: "/home" =the partition where your personal data and personal config files are residing (= "My Documents" dir AND "Documents and Settings" dir in windows)
3/ "swap" =partition used to add virtual (disk) memory to your standard physical (chip) memory = "virtual memory" in windows
What gets me though, is knowing how much space you should allocate to each partition?
 
Old 03-25-2007, 04:01 PM   #5
archive
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: EU (GR)
Distribution: Mandriva 2007, Ubuntu 6.10
Posts: 15

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
So far so Good!

A couple of nice and really helpful explanations!

Having understood the partitions, i would agree to Perdix.
How much should the swap partition be?
I guess the rest two partitions would be relative to my personal files load, as well as to installation and applications needs.

As for the firefox font, i meant if there is a way to tell ff, to use larger fonts than the default to avoid ctrl & + or -, on every page.

Thanks again people!
 
Old 03-25-2007, 04:02 PM   #6
Unknown_User
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: EU (UK)
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.x, Fedora 9, OpenSuSE 11.3, Mythbuntu (Don't know it? Try - it rocks!)
Posts: 225

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perdix

What gets me though, is knowing how much space you should allocate to each partition?
The useful thing about Linux filesystems is that you can change the size of your partitions without pain and losing data is unheard of if you are even moderately skilled.

I have a healthy respect for Microsoft but even using tools such as partition magic on an NTFS drive makes me nervous. Long live EXT3!
 
Old 03-25-2007, 04:07 PM   #7
Unknown_User
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: EU (UK)
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.x, Fedora 9, OpenSuSE 11.3, Mythbuntu (Don't know it? Try - it rocks!)
Posts: 225

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by archive
As for the firefox font, i meant if there is a way to tell ff, to use larger fonts than the default to avoid ctrl & + or -, on every page.
Ah, I see.

Doesn't Edit -> Preferences -> General -> Fonts & Colors allow you to make a permanent change?
 
Old 03-25-2007, 04:20 PM   #8
ernie
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2001
Location: Toledo, Ohio - USA
Distribution: Mageia 1
Posts: 1,079
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 70
As an addendum to Thomas Lemmens's reply:

The Linux file system is a hierarchal file system.

Your partitions are mounted at various locations in the Linux file system.

The "/" directory is the root of the Linux file system.

The "/" partition is called that because it is mounted at the base (/) directory in the Linux file system.

The /home partition (mounted at /home in the Linux file system) contains the personal directories for each user. If you have users 'sam', 'bob', and 'gwen', there will be a directory for each of them under the /home directory (e.g.: /home/sam, /home/bob, and /home/gwen).

The third partition the Mandriva installer set up for you is the swap partition. This is the only partition that is not mounted at a location which is directly accessible in the Linux file system (there is no /swap directory visible in the directory hierarchy). The swap partition is the Linux virtual memory space.

HTH,

Last edited by ernie; 03-25-2007 at 04:24 PM.
 
Old 03-25-2007, 04:31 PM   #9
archive
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: EU (GR)
Distribution: Mandriva 2007, Ubuntu 6.10
Posts: 15

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Got it!

And a very last question i forgot.

When looking for software, do i search for mandriva software or linux software?
 
Old 03-25-2007, 09:25 PM   #10
ernie
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2001
Location: Toledo, Ohio - USA
Distribution: Mageia 1
Posts: 1,079
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 70
In most cases, it is best to use packages from the Mandriva repositories if possible. This makes software management much easier since you can add or remove software with the Mandriva package manager. Most programs you will install will need specific external function libraries. The program may be in one package, and the function libraries it needs may be in several other packages. If you use the Mandriva package manager (or urpmi) to install the program, it will offer to install the packages the program depends on as well, and you do not have to resolve such dependencies yourself.

The packages included in the Mandriva repositories will work correctly in Mandriva, while package(s) from other distribution(s) may not.

If you have not done so, you should set up a full set of Internet Software Media Sources (especially if you have a fast Internet connection) so you can have access to the full range of software packaged for use with Mandriva Linux. See my recommendations as to which sources you should set up on my LQ blog then go to Easy URPMI and follow the direction on the WEB site.

HTH,
 
Old 03-25-2007, 11:36 PM   #11
Sepero
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Tampa, Florida, USA
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 734
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 31
Installing software on Linux is totally different than installing software on MSwindows.

For MSwindows, you search the internet for software and pray you don't get a virus.

On Linux, you install software directly from your distributor (with your 'package manager') and know you're safe.
 
Old 03-26-2007, 07:49 AM   #12
GlennsPref
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Distribution: Mageia Studio-13.37 Kubuntu.
Posts: 3,325
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 199Reputation: 199
You may wish to have other programs not available on the cd.

Try the plf (Penguin Liberation Front) repository (repos) for free and not free packages for Mandriva.

There are others, but see how you go. Cooker and/or backPorts can be a stuggle if you happen upon unresolved

dependencies.

Good to have you among us and remember to search these LQ pages for any tutes and wikis.

Regards, Glenn
 
Old 03-26-2007, 09:14 AM   #13
archive
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: EU (GR)
Distribution: Mandriva 2007, Ubuntu 6.10
Posts: 15

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Well, 24 hours after my very first glimpse of linux, and everything is running really smooth (for the time being), except one thing about which there are numerous resourses on the internet andd forum, but still can't make it work: lilo!!

My setup:
=========

harddisks:
primary (80gb) (hdc1): winXP
secondary (60gb) (hdd1,2,5,6): linux

lilo.config:
default="linux"
boot=/dev/hdd
map=/boot/map
menu-scheme=wb:bw:wb:bw
compact
prompt
nowarn
timeout=300
message=/boot/message
image=/boot/vmlinuz
label="linux"
root=/dev/hdd1
initrd=/boot/initrd.img
append=" splash=silent"
vga=788
image=/boot/vmlinuz
label="linux-nonfb"
root=/dev/hdd1
initrd=/boot/initrd.img
image=/boot/vmlinuz
label="failsafe"
root=/dev/hdd1
initrd=/boot/initrd.img
append=" failsafe"
other=/dev/hdc1
label="Windows"
table=/dev/hdc

All disk addresses were found under /dev/disk/...

Although I get to the lilo boot screen and all selections appear, when i choose windows, i get to a blank dos screen with the cursor blinking, and that's about it!

Note that apparently, the only way to boot to either win or linux, is to change the disk boot priority through my BIOS (and it does work).

Last edited by archive; 03-26-2007 at 09:21 AM.
 
Old 03-26-2007, 03:24 PM   #14
ernie
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2001
Location: Toledo, Ohio - USA
Distribution: Mageia 1
Posts: 1,079
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 70
Quote:
other=/dev/hdc1
label="Windows"
table=/dev/hdc
Try removing the table line:

table=/dev/hdc

On my system Windows is the first partition of the first hard disk (/dev/hda1), so I have
Quote:
other=/dev/hda1
label="Windows"
Windows boots just fine for me.

HTH,
 
Old 03-26-2007, 05:24 PM   #15
GlennsPref
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Distribution: Mageia Studio-13.37 Kubuntu.
Posts: 3,325
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 199Reputation: 199
If you've set up linux with the main windows disk removed in bios, the lilo has probably picked up another fat32 or ntfs partition (edit) and called it Windows by defalt.

So, when you select windows it dosen't find a windows boot loader.

Like Ernie said, windows is usually the first (but not always) partition. My windows boot partition is sdb6. sata

If you have the first primary partition turned off in bios, this won't help much.

EG, what happened to hda(1) disk? in you lilo list.

Lilo or grub will do what you do in bios (select the boot disk) for you. (but I can understand why you did that, for security)

Last edited by GlennsPref; 03-26-2007 at 05:38 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with basic SSH concepts. dr_zayus69 Linux - Networking 1 12-23-2005 01:57 PM
Just installed SUSE 10.0 (Eval.), very impressed, 2 problems (modem and graphics) Eerath Suse/Novell 6 10-21-2005 06:18 AM
Port Forwarding Concepts Question carl.waldbieser Linux - Networking 8 07-06-2005 04:57 PM
boot concepts question rafc Linux - Newbie 1 04-14-2004 08:06 AM
Just installed Mepis - I'm impressed Judland LinuxQuestions.org Member Success Stories 1 04-13-2004 08:11 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:43 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration