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-   -   How to remove Root password (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/mandriva-30/how-to-remove-root-password-394236/)

BangorScott 12-18-2005 02:43 PM

How to remove Root password
 
Have 2006 installed without root password. Had to set a root password when installing driverloader which configures via a web interface ( it wouldn`t accept a blank password for root ). Would like to go back to passwordless root. Have tried blank entry in KDE configurator, but won`t save changes unless characters are entered. Also tried passwd in terminal, but again it will not accept just a return on password entry. Not the end of the world but any ideas ?

mebrelith 12-18-2005 03:24 PM

Moohoohaha, looks like the passwd system is a bit too zealous of your security. You should trust it. Having no passwd for root (didn't even thought that was possible) is a bad bad bad bad bad idea.

As in bad bad bad bad bad bad idea.

perfect_circle 12-18-2005 03:32 PM

login as root and open /etc/shadow with a text editor.

"At the top of the file, you'll see a line starting with root. Right after
root, you'll notice the encrypted password information between two colons.
Here's how root's line in /etc/shadow might look:

root:EnCl6vi6y2KjU:10266:0:::::

To remove root's password, you use the editor to erase the scrambled text
between the two colons, leaving a line that looks like this:

root::10266:0:::::

Save the file and reboot the machine, and you'll be able to log in as root
without a password. The first thing you should do is set a new password
for root, especially if your machine is connected to a network."

This is from slackware-how-to but it should work for the vast majority of the distros.
Be careful when messing with those stuff, and I wouldn't advise you to stay without a root password at all. It's really dangerous.

reddazz 12-18-2005 04:03 PM

This is one of those things that leads to Windows like problems on your Linux. If you don't have a root passowrd, then anyone can do what they want if they break into your system. Even local users can do as they wish without any limitation.

apimente.br 12-19-2005 01:47 PM

Take a look at How to Reset forgotten Root passwords. All your issues will be cleared.:study:

Nelda Nolen 12-22-2005 12:13 PM

Hello, I am of course a newbie in the dark!
I purchased a nice computer at an auction, and have NO idea how to "get in to the OS, and it is password protected. I just want to get in and set up a new OS or at least learn how to use this new system! I am currently attending a vo-tech for computer repair and troubleshooting, but there is so little information about Linux...
HELP! Please!!!
I know how to set jumpers to reset bios in other OS's, but don't know if that will work in Linux...........sheesh, I feel dumb!

During POST it lists gentoo linux and asks for tama-chan password?

BangorScott 12-22-2005 12:54 PM

Thanks for the replies
 
Have decided to stay with a root password, only in as much as the driverloader web interface requires one. While I appreciate the security concerns, I found password less root convienient as a single user not logged on as root,instead of having to supply the root password everytime when tweaking, and I guess that is why Mandriva provides it as an option when installing . I don`t need to worry about others hacking in to break my machine, I do that often enough myself !
thanks

Bangorscott

spooon 12-22-2005 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BangorScott
Have decided to stay with a root password, only in as much as the driverloader web interface requires one. While I appreciate the security concerns, I found password less root convienient as a single user not logged on as root,instead of having to supply the root password everytime when tweaking, and I guess that is why Mandriva provides it as an option when installing . I don`t need to worry about others hacking in to break my machine, I do that often enough myself !
thanks

Bangorscott

You might look into "sudo". sudo allows you to execute commands as root from other accounts without logging in as root. To set it up you add your user to the /etc/sudoers file with the visudo command. By default it prompts your user's password, but it can also be set to not prompt for a password.

spooon 12-22-2005 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nelda Nolen
Hello, I am of course a newbie in the dark!
I purchased a nice computer at an auction, and have NO idea how to "get in to the OS, and it is password protected. I just want to get in and set up a new OS or at least learn how to use this new system! I am currently attending a vo-tech for computer repair and troubleshooting, but there is so little information about Linux...
HELP! Please!!!
I know how to set jumpers to reset bios in other OS's, but don't know if that will work in Linux...........sheesh, I feel dumb!

During POST it lists gentoo linux and asks for tama-chan password?

Nelda Nolen, you should probably start a new thread for this question. First of all, Linux does not load during the POST; so you need to tell us where in the boot process it asks for the password. Do you see some kind of bootloader (something like LILO or GRUB with a menu of options to boot)? Do you see anything about a kernel booting? Do you see a bunch of services loading with "[ok]"?

Nelda Nolen 12-23-2005 10:24 AM

Newbie now Lost in Linux land.........
 
:scratch:
Quote:

Originally Posted by spooon
Nelda Nolen, you should probably start a new thread for this question. First of all, Linux does not load during the POST; so you need to tell us where in the boot process it asks for the password. Do you see some kind of bootloader (something like LILO or GRUB with a menu of options to boot)? Do you see anything about a kernel booting? Do you see a bunch of services loading with "[ok]"?


Thank you, I did try to start a thread yesterday, but I guess I did something wrong...:scratch:

The computer opens up with:
enter current password, ( I changed it in the BIOS, User and supervisor) So I can get past this, and immediately, there is a red "lilo" screen with 'lilo 22.5.9' and only offers load "defaults".
Then it boots through a lot of things like Apache 2, init:entering run level 3, etc. , all followed by the [OK], and finally;
THis isTama-Chan.(none) (Linux i686 2.6.8.1) 04:02:04, then a single line:
Tama-Chan Login:

And the supervisor and user passwords I changed do absolutely nothing here.......I hate being ignorant!!!:confused:
Thank you, Nelda

Nelda

radioradio 12-23-2005 10:45 AM

FWIW I would say .... download (assuming you have a working computer) another linux distro, maybe a live CD and run that. Then decide if you like it and install it. And forget about the pre-installed lunux.

You obviously (unless I misread things) need to get the BIOS to boot from a CD rather than the HDD.
If you are worried about tinkering with the BIOS - maybe linux is not for you ??

Oh ok you say you can get into the bios, well just boot from a CD and install another distro..

Good luck.

Nelda Nolen 12-23-2005 10:59 AM

BIOS changes!
 

AWWWW! I just got so 'freaked' with thinking of learning a NEW OS, that it never entered my feeble mind to just change the boot sequence......sheesh!

Thank you, I am pretty overwhelmed with all the new information I am having to learn at school, ( I am over the hill about a mile..;) surrounded by teenie boppers who get their information by osmosis, you know, it justs jumps from their book into their brains!! all the while I have to read, re-read- read again---well, you get the point, I just ain't as quick as I used to be, but am determined to learn how to repair and upgrade my computers...at least then I won't be ripped off so often at the "shops"!!!!!
Thank you so much for getting me back on a track I can follow!
Nelda.............OLD OLD OLD school :D

radioradio 12-23-2005 11:46 AM

Good luck...

Unfortunately you'll still have to learn the OS once you have booted from the live CD .. ;-))
But as I have been finding over the past year IMO linux is getting more friendly and easier to use.

At least a live CD and a new install will give you a clean slate and you can decide how you like it set up. Good luck .. and I am sure if you ask here ppl will help.

Cheers !

Umikun 13 12-24-2005 09:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by reddazz
This is one of those things that leads to Windows like problems on your Linux. If you don't have a root passowrd, then anyone can do what they want if they break into your system. Even local users can do as they wish without any limitation.

What if you're the only person using your computer? I live by myself and I figured the lock on my apartment door is security enough. :newbie:

reddazz 12-24-2005 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Umikun 13
What if you're the only person using your computer? I live by myself and I figured the lock on my apartment door is security enough. :newbie:

As long as you are connected to the net, you are at risk from intruders. In windows are most attacks not from the web? The same applies in Linux/Unix, someone can access your PC and install a rootkit giving them complete control over your PC. Also it protects you from your own mistakes e.g. making irreversible changes or deleting stuff that can hose your system. Having a root password and not using the root account for day to day purposes may seem like a nuisance for people moving from Windows, but there is a reason why Unix and Linux were designed this way and this results in a better security model when comapred to Windows.


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