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Old 09-12-2013, 09:36 AM   #16
Mossback
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
Just for your info, Mint 15 (and ubuntu 13.04 which its based on) is a very short life release. Its 'out of support' January 2014.

Its fine for some testing, but its not going to be a OS you can run long term.

For something with longer support, maybe try mint 13, its supported til April 2017.

http://www.linuxmint.com/oldreleases.php
What! I thought that going to Linux would prevent the kind of problems I've now got with XP. I might as well go with W7 - that is supported until 2020, and forget about Linux.

Or am I misunderstanding the implications?
 
Old 09-12-2013, 09:57 AM   #17
snowpine
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Hi Mossback,

Most Mint users would not consider it a "problem" that they get a shiny new version of the operating system for free every 6 months. Linux is not Windows and there are many key differences in how the system is updated. Windows users typically upgrade each of their applications separately from the core operating system (which creates many stability problems) whereas Linux users typically upgrade everything at the same time on a scheduled cyclical basis (so everything is tested to work together). You can read more about Mint upgrades here: http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/2

Also as Cascade9 mentioned there are "long term support" (LTS) releases that are supported 5 years for users who prefer less frequent upgrades. The current LTS is Mint 13 supported through April 2017. 5 years of support is a really long time in the Linux world; most users prefer to upgrade every 6-24 months for the latest & greatest software.

If you are looking for longer than 5 years of support then the first thing that comes to mind is Red Hat Enterprise Linux. They support their product for 10 years (13 if you purchase Extended support) but Red Hat is expensive and it is not designed for Linux beginners.

For general purpose home/office use I think an LTS release (5 years support) of a user-friendly distro such as Mint is my recommendation. At this point I think your best bet is to create Live DVDs or Live USBs of a few different distributions and try them in "live" mode (without installing) and then many of your questions/misconceptions will be cleared up.

Last edited by snowpine; 09-12-2013 at 11:03 AM.
 
Old 09-12-2013, 01:00 PM   #18
Mossback
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Oh dear, where's the 'embarrassed' smiley?

Its becoming obvious to me that the linux world is vastly different to the Windows world, plus I must remember to clarify before I post in future.

Thanks for the easily understood explanation and the link was most useful. I have now downloaded the Linux Mint User Guide to a dedicated 'library' folder, I'm sure my library will greatly expand in time. In fact if anyone can direct me to other down-loadable material that will help me gain an insight into Linux I would be most grateful.

Last edited by Mossback; 09-12-2013 at 04:49 PM.
 
Old 09-17-2013, 04:07 AM   #19
Mossback
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Being an impatient so and so, I couldn't wait for the new drive to arrive so partitioned existing drive and installed Mint to have a play. Have managed to connect to my router and do most of the things I do with Windows, except use any Windows specific software of course. Although there is going to be a learning curve to negotiate, on the whole I like it. There seems to be an alternative to most of the general apps I use daily, Libre even opens Win Office files etc.

Reading back through the posts there are a couple of things I cant quite get straight though and perhaps someone can 'straighten' me out please.

1> If Virtualbox is used within Mate and I load W7, how does that work? Does it mean faster switching between the two systems, plus allow the use of copy/cut/paste between the two etc? Is it a better solution than using Wine? My thinking is that using Virtualbox instead of Wine might be better solution, all I need to do is gradually make Linux my every day os and just go in to W7 when needing to use things like Filemaker, Solidworks and Quicken etc.

2> Is the 'long term support' thing, particularly with ver 15 Mate, a real issue. Is this likely to cause similar problems to those with Windows? i.e. upgrades will make some old software incompatible? and lack of support will make the os vulnerable?
 
Old 09-17-2013, 05:50 AM   #20
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mossback View Post
1> If Virtualbox is used within Mate and I load W7, how does that work? Does it mean faster switching between the two systems, plus allow the use of copy/cut/paste between the two etc? Is it a better solution than using Wine? My thinking is that using Virtualbox instead of Wine might be better solution, all I need to do is gradually make Linux my every day os and just go in to W7 when needing to use things like Filemaker, Solidworks and Quicken etc.
Virtualbox basicly runs an OS inside another as an application. You need an install disc/.iso to get it going.

WINE is just a 'compatibility layer', and you dont need a windows install disc.

Becasue virtualbox is running the 'full' OS and WINE is just pretending to be windows, virtualbox tends to work better in some cases.

If your programs run with WINE, I wouldnt bother with Win7 in virtualbox unless it amuses you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mossback View Post
2> Is the 'long term support' thing, particularly with ver 15 Mate, a real issue. Is this likely to cause similar problems to those with Windows? i.e. upgrades will make some old software incompatible? and lack of support will make the os vulnerable?
No matter what you do, you wont get long term support with Mint 15.

As far as the LTS Mint (currently 13) Ubuntu (currently 12.04) versions go, updates can on very rare occasions 'break' some software. Its _much_ rarer with them, or linux OSes in general, than it is with windows.

Running any unsupported OSes has risks. Linux is less risky to run unsupported tha windows...but there is still risk. I wouldnt run any OS which isnt currently supported and updated regularly if its ever connected to the internet, no matter if its Windows, MacOS, Linux, BSD, or one of the smaller/uncommon OSes.
 
Old 09-18-2013, 09:34 AM   #21
Z038
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
As far as the LTS Mint (currently 13) Ubuntu (currently 12.04) versions go, updates can on very rare occasions 'break' some software. Its _much_ rarer with them, or linux OSes in general, than it is with windows.
I'm not sure I agree with this. In fact, I'd say the opposite. But I may not understand what you mean. Could you elaborate?
 
Old 09-18-2013, 04:47 PM   #22
Mossback
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Have now fitted a new drive and tried to install Mint 13 Mate on it. Had to abort first attempt but will try again tomorrow, I think help might be required.
 
Old 09-19-2013, 06:54 AM   #23
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z038 View Post
I'm not sure I agree with this. In fact, I'd say the opposite. But I may not understand what you mean. Could you elaborate?
I meant system/security updates/upgrades, not upgrading to a newer version of the OS. Using ubuntu as an example, getting all the updates to make a 12.04 install into 12.04.1.

Though getting all the updates with linux OSes is a bit different to the windows SP (service pack) updates, in my experince getting windows SP#X update is more likely to 'break' software than doing a similar thing with linux OSes.
 
Old 09-19-2013, 09:20 AM   #24
Z038
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Ok, thanks for the explanation.

I think in the Linux world, the distro has the greatest impact on stability across upgrades and security updates. Some have been more problematic than others for me. I've never used Mint, and I installed Ubuntu a couple of times for someone else, so I can't comment on them, but Slackware has been relatively painless, with minimal breakage due to upgrades. Most of the software breakage I've experienced when upgrading/updating any Linux distro has been related to X11 graphics support or caused by my own mistakes. There is a learning curve to cleanly upgrading a Linux system, and it is often specific to the distro you are using.

In the case of Windows, I've used or supported users of every version from 1.01 through Windows 7. The vast majority of software breakage I've seen has occurred at major architectural transitions, like the transition from Windows 1.0/2.0 to Win 3x, Win 3x to Win 9x/ME, and Win9x to the NT/2000/XP/Vista/7/8 family. Upgrading from one Win version to the next within a family has not caused much pain. Most of the problems I've seen have been related to anti-virus and internet security software. One good thing about Windows is that for more than a decade since the release of XP, every version has had excellent long term support, and for a far longer term than any Linux distro I'm aware of.
 
  


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