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Old 02-15-2010, 03:02 PM   #1
tronayne
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VirtualBox Negative Image


I've had this problem for a while; when VirtualBox is started all Linux-side windows go "negative," kind of like a photographic negative and are pretty much unusable until KDE is restarted.

This happens on two Dell Dimension boxes both running Slackware 13.0 32-bit with attached LCD displays (one Acer, one Dell [who knows what that actually is]). The problem does not appear on a Dell Inspiron 1750 (running Slackware 13.0 64-bit).

All three servers are running KDE 4.2.x and all three are running VirtualBox-3.1.4-57640-Linux_amd64.run or VirtualBox-3.1.4-57640-Linux_x86.run as appropriate for the platform (the latest version). This problem existed prior to the update to the current version as well on the 32-bit boxes but not on the 64-bit.

Any ideas?
 
Old 02-15-2010, 05:26 PM   #2
allanf
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What is the host OS, What is the guest OS, what are the color palettes that the host OS are using?

Are some of the windows (application) using there own color sets?
 
Old 02-16-2010, 05:23 AM   #3
brianL
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It might be KDE4.2.4 that's the problem. Get the 4.3.1 packages from here:

http://cardinal.lizella.net/~vbatts/...ackages/4.3.1/

Get them all in a directory, the run:
Code:
upgradepkg --install-new *.t?z
Don't forget to blacklist them if you use slackpkg.
 
Old 02-16-2010, 05:41 AM   #4
tronayne
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The host OS is Slackware 13.0 32-bit, the guest is XP. The window manager, in Slackware, is KDE 4.2. What palettes? I dunno, and don't know how to find out -- but both KDE and XP are their default, 32-bit and neither has been fooled around with. None of the three servers have an /etc/xorg.conf file, I let them default to udev and everything else works just fine. I did try running xorgsetup to auto-generate an xorg.conf on one of the problem servers, but that didn't make any difference in anything so I removed it.

It does not matter if anything is actually exectued in XP -- simply starting VirtualBox causes the problem or starting VirtualBox, booting XP and immediately shutting it down also causes the problem.

Again, this is a problem with two servers -- the other, a laptop, does not have the problem and it and the other servers are identically configured with the same distribution (except for the 32-bit on the two and 64-bit on the one).

This problem has existed through three versions of VirtualBox, all the "binary" versions (I don't compile the open source versions because of the functions that version does not support, I use the "run" one to install).
 
Old 02-16-2010, 05:45 AM   #5
tronayne
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Quote:
It might be KDE4.2.4 that's the problem. Get the 4.3.1 packages from here
Thanks, I did think about that... but, had the same problem on the same server with KDE 3.x (from Slackware 12.x) too. And through two updates of VirtualBox.

So, I dunno.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 12:08 AM   #6
allanf
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The reason I asked about the palettes is the X has many available.

If I am running in "24-bit color" and an application "creates it's window' in "32-bit color", the colors go weird in the the other windows (24-bit color) while the "32-bit color" window has the focus and via-a-versa.

Window specific information can be obtained via the "xwininfo" command then click on the window. For example my firefox has the output of:
Code:
bash$ xwininfo 

xwininfo: Please select the window about which you
          would like information by clicking the
          mouse in that window.

xwininfo: Window id: 0xe00033 "VirtualBox Negative Image - LinuxQuestions.org - Mozilla Firefox"

  Absolute upper-left X:  52
  Absolute upper-left Y:  22
  Relative upper-left X:  0
  Relative upper-left Y:  0
  Width: 823
  Height: 683
  Depth: 24
  Visual: 0x21
  Visual Class: TrueColor
  Border width: 0
  Class: InputOutput
  Colormap: 0x20 (installed)
  Bit Gravity State: NorthWestGravity
  Window Gravity State: NorthWestGravity
  Backing Store State: NotUseful
  Save Under State: no
  Map State: IsViewable
  Override Redirect State: no
  Corners:  +52+22  -149+22  -149-63  +52-63
  -geometry 823x683+48+0

bash$
Because the next tool I talk about, I see that this is '24-bit color' window.



The command "xdpyinfo" reports information about the display including the palettes. Most of the Linux video is "24-bit color". The palettes are called "visual" within X. For example my computer has support for:
Code:
bash$ xdpyinfo  | grep -E 'screen|visual|class|depth'
    depth 1, bits_per_pixel 1, scanline_pad 32
    depth 4, bits_per_pixel 8, scanline_pad 32
    depth 8, bits_per_pixel 8, scanline_pad 32
    depth 15, bits_per_pixel 16, scanline_pad 32
    depth 16, bits_per_pixel 16, scanline_pad 32
    depth 24, bits_per_pixel 32, scanline_pad 32
    depth 32, bits_per_pixel 32, scanline_pad 32
default screen number:    0
number of screens:    1
screen #0:
  depths (7):    24, 1, 4, 8, 15, 16, 32
  depth of root window:    24 planes
  number of visuals:    72
  default visual id:  0x21
  visual:
    visual id:    0x21
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x22
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xc5
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xc6
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xc7
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xc8
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xc9
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xca
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xcb
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xcc
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xcd
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xce
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xcf
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd0
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd1
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd2
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd3
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd4
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd5
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd6
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd7
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd8
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xd9
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xda
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xdb
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xdc
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xdd
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xde
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xdf
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe0
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe1
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe2
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe3
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe4
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe5
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe6
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe7
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe8
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xe9
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xea
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xeb
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xec
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xed
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xee
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xef
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf0
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf1
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf2
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf3
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf4
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf5
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf6
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf7
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf8
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xf9
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xfa
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xfb
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xfc
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xfd
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xfe
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0xff
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x100
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x101
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x102
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x103
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x104
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x105
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x106
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x107
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x108
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x109
    class:    DirectColor
    depth:    24 planes
  visual:
    visual id:    0x64
    class:    TrueColor
    depth:    32 planes
bash$
 
Old 02-17-2010, 08:33 AM   #7
tronayne
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So, if I understand what you're telling me, if the Linux host is 24-bit and the XP guest is 32-bit, I should set the XP guest to 24-bit and all will be well? No more making KDE go crazy (and stay insane until it's shut down and restarted)? And what if an XP application demands 32-bit (so the guest window doesn't all of a sudden go to postage-stamp size and is unadjustable)?

Tiz a puzzlement.
 
Old 02-18-2010, 10:22 AM   #8
allanf
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I am asking if the weird colors on the host correct when you focus a host window.

The current "X window system" protocol (X11) dates back to 1987 while the first version was in 1894 at MIT after doing surgery to "W" to make it run faster under UNIX. When the "protocol" changes the major version number changes and about at major version 9, people started referring to it as X9 as well as simply X.

The typical GUI environment on a Linux system has three layers of GUI.
3) Desktop environment (KDE, Gnome, xfce, ...) which sits on top of layer 2
2) Window manager (Compiz Fusion, Compiz, Metacity, Blackbox, FVWM, Enlightenment, Openbox, Sawfish, IceWm, ... which sits on top of layer 1
1) X server (this server provides access to the hardware display, keyboard, mice)

When a "GUI application" is written, the author has to decide which layer (in 1993 I had an application that had been written to layer 1 and we added access to layer 2 in a year long migration to a layer 2 application) they will be using to talk to the hardware. If at layer 3 then the layer 3 talks to the layer 2 which talks to layer 1 which talks to the hardware. The biggest advantage of X over windows is that the hardware being talked to can reside on a completely different computer (completely network transparent from the first version).

Because there are may "visual" definitions and the "GUI application" in Linux can select which "visual" is being used. If that "GUI application" results in its own color palette, then when it has "focus" the whole display is using its palette. Realize that X was created from "W" back in 1984 when every thing was black and white (color was as added in September 1985 with version 9 of X) and at that time 8-bit color was the normal. Without the capability of allowing an application to be able to create its own palette, the total number of colors would be the first 16 colors registered and of those 16 two were white and black. Do if the first application grabbed another 10 colors, the second application would have access to the 12 already allocated and could allocate up to 4 more. As soon as the full 16 were grabbed, an application requesting a new color would be rejected as the palette was full. By allowing the capability to have your own palette (which must be present in the code for the application) the application would be allowed to use the full 16 colors.

This could be true if 24-bit and 32-bit applications reside at the same time. I have not gotten "uevent" X to be 32-bit and it falls back to 24-bit so my color count has suffered at the freedom of not having an "xorg.conf" file.
 
Old 02-19-2010, 07:27 AM   #9
tronayne
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Quote:
I am asking if the weird colors on the host correct when you focus a host window.
Nope.

It goes like this
  1. log in
  2. startx
  3. start VirtualBox
  4. start XP
  5. click or focus on a host window -- weird colors
  6. shut down XP
  7. shut down VirtualBox
  8. weird colors -- entire screen
  9. shut down KDE
  10. startx
  11. all is normal
Tiz a puzzlement.
 
Old 02-20-2010, 12:48 AM   #10
allanf
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I'm running KDE 4.3.3, virtualbox (non-OSE) 3.0.12, xorg-server 1.6.5-r1. Gentoo, on a Thinkpad R60, intel i950 video. When and loaded a Windows XP pro to test (took twice as long to install as Fedora 12 over the net). I have none of these issues with it.

The only thing I can think of at this time to attempt is:
"ctrl-alt-f4" and then "ctrl-alt-f7" does this help, as it changes the video card modes most of the time.
 
  


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