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-   -   Will any of my Windows apps work if I switch to linux? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-software-2/will-any-of-my-windows-apps-work-if-i-switch-to-linux-537998/)

5fingerdiscount 03-16-2007 07:51 AM

Will any of my Windows apps work if I switch to linux?
 
:newbie: here and I've been reading and reading for hours and my head is spinning.

I have dozens of Windows based apps on my portable Windows machine which I use for everything, but namely photo, sound, and video editing with Photoshop, Premiere, Sound Forge, Vegas, Acid, and others. I've been wanting to make the switch to linux and say goooooodbye to Wind-blows, but I've heard that if I do, I'll also say adios to my apps. Is this true?

Matz 03-16-2007 08:17 AM

Yes and no.
Many applications are developed only for windows, many others are also developed for linux.

If there is no linux version of your favorite application you can find a good substitute for it, even though switching between apps is always a bit painful

For example:
-Gimp is good as image editor, and I think as powerful as photoshop (or even more)
-Premiere: don't know what it is
-Sound Forge: there is a linux clone of it, "Wave forge" but other sound editors are available, audacity is a very good one
-...

Summarizing: if you switch to linux, keep in mind that you will not find all of your windows apps, but if you are really likely to find others with fits your needs

pixellany 03-16-2007 08:27 AM

Some have good equivalents on Linux--others can be run with WINE or CrossOver Office.
There are very few things you cannot do on Linux, but there are a few areas where you have to work a bit.

You may also want to consider dual-booting or using a virtual machine to install Windows within Linux.

I would start with a dual-boot, and take it one step at a time.

5fingerdiscount 03-16-2007 10:06 AM

Thanks Matz, Premiere is Adobes video editing app. Funny you would mention waveforge & audacity, I use both of them now, but only for editing single wave clips as they don't have the capacity for multi-track nor are they studio quality.

Like you said, switching is a PITA! I'm using a linux machine now (I'm at work), and keyboard short cuts I'm used to using are not working.

Hi Pixellany, thanks for the tips. I'll read a little more about WINE when my head is clearer, it sounds useful. So does virtual machine. I think I used a v.m. years ago when it was still very buggy. How are they now and do you know where I can find a stable download?

Thx,

5fingerdiscount

dive 03-16-2007 10:42 AM

I believe Ardour does multi-tracking. Qemu is a simple and stable vm, but you might find it better to see what will work with Wine before using a vm.

TB0ne 03-16-2007 03:11 PM

Cinellera is a great video-editing program. There are also some HDRI programs for Linux out there, too, which (given what you've said), you might need. :)

There's a learning cure, no doubt. But it's well worth it in the end...I haven't touched anything from Microsoft in six years, and don't miss a thing. I can't think of anything I can't do, that my Windows-user friends can.

m_yates 03-16-2007 03:22 PM

If you must have windows, you can install win4lin. I haven't used it in a long time, but it allows you to install a full version of windows running on a virtual machine in linux. It is only $70, so it is less expensive than similar software. It will let you run any windows application in the windows environment. The disadvantage is that you need to buy a full licensed version of windows as well.

I personally use crossover office for a couple of applications (Endnote primarily) that do not have good linux-native alternatives. Crossover won't let you run all windows applications, only a select few, and even those won't always work flawlessly.

almatic 03-16-2007 03:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TB0ne
Cinellera is a great video-editing program.

yeah, but unfortunately the developers seem to have chosen to let the application crash whenever you try something it can't do. This is very, very annoying imho as you have no chance of just experimenting around (like I usually do). You have to know exactly what you are doing when working with cinelerra and that's not easy with this quirky interface.

I use LIVES for video editing btw. It's a pretty reliable, intuative tool with a couple of effects, can export many formats and has timeline working just as premiere. For getting the video out of my dv-cam I use kino.
Of course one could just buy Mainactor, which comes closest to premiere I guess. It costs around 150 bucks which is only a fraction of the price of the adobe products.
On the other hand, if I had already spent so much money for the adobe stuff, I'd probably continue using that ...

jlinkels 03-16-2007 07:55 PM

VMWare virtual machine is free. Yes, you still have to buy a Windows license, but we have allowed M$ to move itself into a position where they could have this policy.

As it comes to running windows apps *really* compatible, use VMWare.

Apart from a few, very few, uncommon apps (and Internet Explorer) there is a Linux flavour of a Windows program and as least as much fun to work with.

jlinkels

5fingerdiscount 03-22-2007 01:31 PM

Thanks for the tips. I'll see if I can find a Windows version of the various apps before I trying switching over from Windows to Linux. I've found some apps like Open Office are great on either (I'm using Linux at work). Then others leave a lot to wish for. I would say that 75% of my computer work is media manipulation (that's my second/dream job), and Windows tends to be big and slower than I would like. Plus, I'm not crazy about the 'black box' and NSA key installed on all versions of Windows since 98.

tredegar 03-22-2007 02:40 PM

Quote:

I'll see if I can find a Windows version of the various apps before I trying switching over from Windows to Linux.
Most modern linux distros will install on a windows computer, and let you "dual boot" - you get a choice of booting into windows or linux as your computer starts up. So you can "try switching" anytime, and always have the option to go back. You'll know you've caught the linux bug when you set your boot manager to default to linux!
Meanwhile, there are plenty of people here to help you along as you get started. Have fun.

shshjun 03-22-2007 02:42 PM

there are probably many places that provide a list for you already, for example, check this one:
http://www.grokdoc.net/index.php/Switching_to_Linux


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