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Old 04-12-2013, 01:15 AM   #5011
irneb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamah View Post
irneb
I don't know, may be our LISP-scripts was written with any zwcad-features (i am not cad-user, i am only administrator), but some our LISP-scripts make a wrong mark in BricsCAD in Linux (Windows version are not tested). :-(
It might very well be. AutoCAD's lisp interpreter was "stolen" from an old '70s version of XLisp, then a 3rd party created the VitalLisp addon which allowed the scripts to be compiled and work with ActiveX (around mid '90s), then Adesk bought that and renamed it to VisualLisp.

BricsCAD uses OpenLisp (I think), though they have extended it themselves by adding some BC-only functions (the vle-* range): http://www.bricsys.com/common/suppor...d.jsp?id=18209

All the other functions of AutoLisp/VisualLisp is available in BC as well. So if the LSP works in ACad it works in BC. Apparently it runs faster than ACad in interpreted mode and in some cases even faster than ACad's compiled mode.

Not sure what ZW uses as its lisp engine. Perhaps your scripts are using some feature specific to ZW's implementation? Or if your script uses any of the vlax-* functions (i.e. the ActiveX stuff of AutoCAD's VisualLisp) then there's not going to be any way or getting them to work on any Linux based clone.

Even AutoCAD had to add new lisp functions for their Mac version so some functionalities (which were previously only possible through ActiveX) could be done directly through the lisp engine: http://hyperpics.blogs.com/beyond_th...2-for-mac.html

BTW, I've found that if wanting a "free" cad, then nanoCAD seems even more capable than BC/ZW. Unfortunately though, it's also Windows-only. It runs AutoLisp scripts fine. But where it outperforms BC/ZW is it does tables and dynamic blocks perfectly, the other 2 either don't do those or only partially.

Last edited by irneb; 04-12-2013 at 01:17 AM.
 
Old 04-18-2013, 07:17 AM   #5012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamah View Post
irneb
I don't know, may be our LISP-scripts was written with any zwcad-features (i am not cad-user, i am only administrator), but some our LISP-scripts make a wrong mark in BricsCAD in Linux (Windows version are not tested). :-(
AutoCAD and GIS tools are full fledged drawing and editing tools, to my knowledge there is no equivalent in Linux version
 
Old 04-19-2013, 06:23 AM   #5013
irneb
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Originally Posted by programer View Post
AutoCAD and GIS tools are full fledged drawing and editing tools, to my knowledge there is no equivalent in Linux version
As I've stated before in this thread: A program called BricsCAD does have a Linux native version. It's close to an exact clone of AutoCAD 2008, though it uses the same file format as AutoCAD 2013. Just some of the newer functionality is not implemented, but it does introduce some new features of its own - which IMO ACad is the poorer without. I've personally tested it on Ubuntu and Fedora, it worked fine except for some issues when installing onto Fedora 64 bit.

So it depends on if you actually use stuff like geometric constraints, otherwise BC on Linux should do fine for you. They also do have addons similar to AutoCAD Architecture, Civil, etc. How well they compare I'm not too sure though - not tested them personally.
 
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:19 AM   #5014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irneb View Post
As I've stated before in this thread: A program called BricsCAD does have a Linux native version. It's close to an exact clone of AutoCAD 2008, though it uses the same file format as AutoCAD 2013. Just some of the newer functionality is not implemented, but it does introduce some new features of its own - which IMO ACad is the poorer without. I've personally tested it on Ubuntu and Fedora, it worked fine except for some issues when installing onto Fedora 64 bit.
So it depends on if you actually use stuff like geometric constraints, otherwise BC on Linux should do fine for you. They also do have addons similar to AutoCAD Architecture, Civil, etc. How well they compare I'm not too sure though - not tested them personally.
This is a fantastic information I had tried in Google with all possible CAD versions that may work with Linux but this software never showed up. I now verified this software website and found that this is a cool tool, happy to know that something is there in Linux for CAD drawings.

But the only problem with this software is its a paid version which is no good, when some one is using Linux he is going to expect a free version.
 
Old 04-19-2013, 01:46 PM   #5015
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by programer View Post
But the only problem with this software is its a paid version which is no good, when some one is using Linux he is going to expect a free version.
A common misconception, that the OS is free does not mean that Linux users expect all software to be free especially business users are even willing to pay a good amount of money for support for their Linux versions. In fact often Linux users are willing to pay more for good software than OS X or Windows users.
 
Old 04-19-2013, 04:31 PM   #5016
irneb
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Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
A common misconception, that the OS is free does not mean that Linux users expect all software to be free especially business users are even willing to pay a good amount of money for support for their Linux versions. In fact often Linux users are willing to pay more for good software than OS X or Windows users.
Good point! It's probably due to this misconception that there are so few Linux equivalents to these type of products!

I'm willing to pay for something like BricsCAD (definitely in comparison to AutoCAD's price), as it does next to everything I tend to use in AutoCAD. The only reason I'm still stuck in Winblows land is Revit. For that one I cannot find anything (paid-for or otherwise) which can run on anything BUT Windows. For all other programs I can find some form of equivalent, not always better - but at least able to produce the same end result.

E.g. for the programs I actually use during work hours:
  • PhotoShop --> Gimp
  • CorelDraw --> InkScape
  • InDesign --> Scribus
  • Ms Office --> Libre Office
  • Outlook --> Thunderbird
  • 3d Studio --> Blender
  • AutoCAD --> BricsCAD
  • Revit --> ????
BTW, this site lists quite a few programs available for each category: http://linuxappfinder.com/graphics/cad
 
Old 04-20-2013, 10:30 AM   #5017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
A common misconception, that the OS is free does not mean that Linux users expect all software to be free especially business users are even willing to pay a good amount of money for support for their Linux versions. In fact often Linux users are willing to pay more for good software than OS X or Windows users.
May be a high end user, that's where linux stops... Microsoft dominates the desktop arena because of this. Coming to the question, its not a misconception but its an expectation, unless its free, why one should shift to Linux? The learning curve is high, getting support is not so easy, also things are complicated in Linux,so obviously people will still love Windows which is simple and easy to learn for any newbie, it will continue dominating.

I too know that there are paid versions in Linux and free versions too, but if a software is being promoted for free to use, then it should contain more free software's which is a general expectation.


Quote:
Good point! It's probably due to this misconception that there are so few Linux equivalents to these type of products!

I'm willing to pay for something like BricsCAD (definitely in comparison to AutoCAD's price), as it does next to everything I tend to use in AutoCAD. The only reason I'm still stuck in Winblows land is Revit. For that one I cannot find anything (paid-for or otherwise) which can run on anything BUT Windows. For all other programs I can find some form of equivalent, not always better - but at least able to produce the same end result.
I am too a civil engineer who is searching such a nice program, there are few for GIS but not many for CAD and interior designing, architecture etc. Revit is cool software, paid version but is worth buying, a similar software in Linux will be interesting to me.
 
Old 04-21-2013, 05:51 AM   #5018
irneb
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Originally Posted by programer View Post
The learning curve is high, getting support is not so easy, also things are complicated in Linux,so obviously people will still love Windows which is simple and easy to learn for any newbie, it will continue dominating.
That's usually where the "paid for" versions come in. When you want everything for free, Linux tends to be a bit baffling for the newbie. Simply because you'll have to do everything yourself. To get someone to install all your needed programs and setup all your drivers, you'd pay for that service. Unfortunately there's no pre-made paid-for version I know of which caters for the CAD genre - perhaps that's a business opportunity!

Quote:
Originally Posted by programer View Post
I am too a civil engineer who is searching such a nice program, there are few for GIS but not many for CAD and interior designing, architecture etc. Revit is cool software, paid version but is worth buying, a similar software in Linux will be interesting to me.
OK, for civil I'd forget about Revit. It's site tools are dinky-toys in comparison to something like AutoDesk's Civil3D. I'm in Architecture myself, where Revit flourishes - it's building creation tools are second to none (or perhaps very few, maybe ArchiCAD comes close). Most other stuff like structures & HVAC also seem to be decently catered for. But for siteworks I tend to obtain a DWG file a Civil engineer / surveyor gave me and simply use that as an imported object instead.

BTW, I've just come across FreeCAD. It does seem to have parametric modelling with models being able to have properties linked to one-another. Only just started trying it though, so can't say too much about it - but from the samples it does seem to provide "some" of Revit's functionality.
 
Old 04-21-2013, 10:11 AM   #5019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irneb View Post
BTW, I've just come across FreeCAD. It does seem to have parametric modelling with models being able to have properties linked to one-another. Only just started trying it though, so can't say too much about it - but from the samples it does seem to provide "some" of Revit's functionality.
This version of CAD software is really good, I am trying it in my computer which have Ubuntu version, will inform some time later after using it for some time.
 
Old 04-23-2013, 01:09 PM   #5020
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For 3D, you might also look at VariCAD, gCAD3D, BRL-CAD, CYCAS, OpenCASCADE, ARES and CityEngine.


For 2D you can check out Draftsight.

At one time ArchiCAD and Bentley were asking for input on users wanting a Linux version, wouldn't hurt to contact them, at one time Pro-E was available for Linux, but no more.
 
Old 04-24-2013, 01:25 AM   #5021
irneb
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Originally Posted by SLW210 View Post
... at one time Pro-E was available for Linux, but no more.
Strange! As far as I remember Pro-E was the pre-runner to Revit. Or at least the guys who created Pro Engineer, also started Revit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revit#History
 
Old 04-24-2013, 08:35 AM   #5022
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Another doubt is arising to me.. If some one want to learn any of this CAD program should they adopt the self learning technique or any coaching center kind of methods are also available?
 
Old 04-24-2013, 01:04 PM   #5023
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Another doubt is arising to me.. If some one want to learn any of this CAD program should they adopt the self learning technique or any coaching center kind of methods are also available?
I'm self learned in CAD myself, though I started on a drafting board manually drafting and took a couple of courses in High School and College for the manual drafting. I would recommend at least an introductory course of some type if you are unfamiliar with drafting. Lot's of good tutorials, forums and websites around these days for the self learners as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irneb View Post
Strange! As far as I remember Pro-E was the pre-runner to Revit. Or at least the guys who created Pro Engineer, also started Revit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revit#History
Not sure how long it was available for Linux, but they did have it.

Same guys that worked on Pro/E development (they weren't the creators, that would be Dr. Samuel P. Geisberg), but they went on their own and started a new company, then sold to Autodesk.

You would think BIM would be a Prime candidate for Linux systems.

Last edited by SLW210; 04-25-2013 at 03:25 PM. Reason: Spelling
 
Old 04-25-2013, 01:15 PM   #5024
irneb
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Originally Posted by SLW210 View Post
You would think BIM would be a Prime candidate for Linux systems.
You're probably correct about Pro/E and Revit.

As for BIM on Linux, +2! It seems the management portion does tend to go onto a Linux (or unix-type) server more ofthen than not. Usually in the form of IFC files - which are basically databases of building components. The server would then analogue a dbms for queries on this.

But creation tools (like Revit) seem to be as numerous as chicken teeth! Actually, I'd have though the management portion of BIM is a prime candidate for a fondle slab! I can just see the caretaker checking on a cheapie android 7" which lights are next in line for replacement (perhaps showing a floor layout to map where they are) instead of walking several miles to check up on all of them! But for the creation, you'd need a decent desktop with smooth 3D capabilities, and what better than a high-spec Linux Desktop?

Last edited by irneb; 04-25-2013 at 01:18 PM.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 05:09 AM   #5025
dominik232
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I approve with many of you.
The only thing i need is Adobe Photoshop. I can run it with Wine help, but it's still a little troubled, not very integrated with desktop, working on PSD files is possible but uncomfortable. I like to use Gimp just for my own, but sometimes i need to get data from PSD file (e.g. for webpages layout)

Now Adobe stopped support Adobe Air... This application is required in my country to make annual tax compliance online - now possible only in Windows an OSX.

I'd be happy if that thread really will give some positive changes to Linux users
 
  


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