LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-15-2003, 11:49 PM   #16
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30

Thanks, It's getting clearer --

So now I have my HTML files, and my mandrake server partition with all of the proper software, running KDE (on the good computer.) I have a domain name: www.crdp.tk my IP is 192.168.1.25, and the GA is 192.168.1.1

This may sound incredibly stupid, but how would I get the HTML files to be served through the domain when I'm running that partition?
 
Old 10-16-2003, 08:35 AM   #17
JimKyle
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2001
Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA
Distribution: Xubuntu 16.04 LTS
Posts: 207
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 38
Your www.crdp.tk URL brings up a page about the Columbia River Delta Project, plus a pop-up. Are you sure that this is your domain?

The 192.168.x.x series of addresses are strictly local to your LAN and won't go through the routers on the Internet. Depending on how you're connecting to the outside world, you should have another IP address that's your external one.

To get your web server available to the outside world, you need to be sure that the httpd service is running and that you have TCP port 80, as a minimum, open and listening. At the command line or in a terminal window, use "service httpd status" to determine whether it's running, and "service httpd start" to launch it. To find out the status of ports, use "netstat" and look for TCP 80.

Hope this helps...

Last edited by JimKyle; 10-16-2003 at 08:38 AM.
 
Old 10-16-2003, 03:46 PM   #18
GAVollink
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: St. Paul, Minnesota
Distribution: UbuntuStudio, Ubuntu
Posts: 357

Rep: Reputation: 31
I am filling in these answers (a little late)

NFS is Network Filesystem - NFS is a more-or-less UNIX centric way of sharing files between computers. All major UNIX distributions can share directories to NFS and mount shares from NFS. Samba - SMB protocol - is the same, but Windows -to- UNIX based. Although Linux machines can mount shares between eachother using Samba.

SSH is a remote "terminal" interface. it allows you to access to command line shell functions. SSH functions the same way as "telnet", except it encrypts all of the data between the host and client - thus is considered more secure.
 
Old 10-16-2003, 06:04 PM   #19
SpecialOps
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Bilzen
Distribution: Debian, Mandrake, Slackware
Posts: 11

Rep: Reputation: 0
your little problem

Hello

I think you probably need SAMBA to share files and maps and printers and all other stuff between Linux and Windows.

For your web you need a webserver (Apache - MySQL)
and you have to place you webpages in /var/www

For FTP i recommend proftpd

for remote control: SSH

If you have never installed a Linux distro I recommend you to start with KNOPPIX because it works from the CD. It's easy and you can't do anything wrong, once you reboot, everything is normal again. And it's a good distro to get familiar with Linux and it's environment. You can learn easily the commands and other stuff

Then you proceed to a distro that needs to be install on hard drive. E.g. Red Hat or Mandrake (or perhaps SuSe) because these have the ease of a nice and easy GUI for installing the distro.

Greetz Fabio
 
Old 10-16-2003, 08:42 PM   #20
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks for the information, guys I already have mandrake with all of the necessary server software installed.

Apparently my ISP does not block any ports.

On the topic of ports, I'm not sure, but I *think* 80 is working. It says that apache is up and running, and typing in netstat brings up a whole bunch of threes and two's - and numbers in the thousands. No 80 is listed (I assume I could forward this port on my router?)

yup - www.crdp.tk is my 'domain' name. Currently it's pointing to my geocities site since the webserver isn't running yet.

And I found out my ip, Perhaps it isn't safe to post on here, but it starts wiith 66.222.XXX.XXX.

So what would I type into another computer to access the index.html inside /var/www?

I think Its getting close to working

Also, it's funny because the book I read recommended wuftp over *everything* else. But the linux community seems to prefer pro-ftp.

Last edited by flamesrock; 10-16-2003 at 08:44 PM.
 
Old 10-16-2003, 09:02 PM   #21
JimKyle
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2001
Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA
Distribution: Xubuntu 16.04 LTS
Posts: 207
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally posted by flamesrock
And I found out my ip, Perhaps it isn't safe to post on here, but it starts wiith 66.222.XXX.XXX.

So what would I type into another computer to access the index.html inside /var/www?
Just to verify things from another location, try doing http://66.222.XXX.XXX:80/ (where the XXX's are replaced by the corresponding numbers of your IP) and see if you get anything. This bypasses the entire question of the domain name.

If you're not on a static IP (one that never changes) you may need to use a DNS-forwarding service such as dns2go.com or one of the others. If you are on a static IP, have your domain pointed to it instead of to your Geocities page, to use it.

As for the numbers you see on a netstat report, those at the left edge of each entry are PID numbers, process ID values. Try "netstat -n" and look for "0.0.0.0:80" or "*:80" in the address columns. Without the "-n" netstat translates the port numbers to service names...
 
Old 10-16-2003, 09:21 PM   #22
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks

My IP is in fact a static one. When I type that in, it brings me to the homepage of my linksys router control center, asking for a password just as the normal IP does.

Is it supposed to do that? Or do I need to type more into the address?
 
Old 10-16-2003, 10:28 PM   #23
JimKyle
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2001
Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA
Distribution: Xubuntu 16.04 LTS
Posts: 207
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 38
I don't have an answer, since I use Linux to do my routing rather than a separate box. I would expect using your IP address from another machine (not on your LAN) to go through the router and reach the Apache server, but you may need to configure the router to let TCP ports 80-83 and 443 through. Hopefully someone who's using a Linksys will jump in with the solution!
 
Old 10-17-2003, 12:44 AM   #24
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks,

I think I see what you're saying. I'll try forwarding those ports, too. Gettin' closer and closer
 
Old 10-18-2003, 01:15 AM   #25
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Woops!

I forwarded ports 80 - 83 for tcp and ldp and then checked 'enable'.

It saved the setting for my linksys router, but now I cannot access the router page! (this is from linux, I'm not sure about windows yet.)

What have I done?
 
Old 10-18-2003, 07:33 AM   #26
chup
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: South Africa
Distribution: Ubuntu (Feisty)
Posts: 280

Rep: Reputation: 30
have you tried logging on to the router page using port 88 instead of 80?
on my router, when i enable port forwarding at port 80, the settings server (or whatever its called) changes the port to 88 as default if im correct.
 
Old 10-18-2003, 12:33 PM   #27
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
I managed to log in through port 80, thankfully.

The current problem is trying to get the FTP to work. There is a DNS timeout, and it doesn't seem to connect (from a different comp on the LAN, through downtown.)
 
Old 10-22-2003, 12:59 AM   #28
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks JimKyle -- your help was a godsend.
 
Old 10-22-2003, 01:58 AM   #29
Robert0380
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Atlanta
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 1,280

Rep: Reputation: 47
Just for more clairty on NFS vs. SSH:

NFS like (Network File System like GAV said) is used to mount file systems over a network.

Explaination: If you have a Linux box in your living room and one in your bedroom, you could run NFS server on the Living room box and EXPORT the /home directory and allow it to be MOUNTED by the box in the bedroom (IP based access stuff).

This way, when you boot your bedroom box, it goes out and connects to the living room box and MOUNTS he /home directory and treats it as if the /home is actually on the Bedroom box itself. This is very useful if you have a lab full of linux boxes and dont want to have to give every machine a home directory for every user that has to log in. You can centralize the home directory in 1 file server and use NFS to mount it so that the user has his/her files no matter which computer he/she logs into (neat stuff). You can use NFS and mount stuff as needed but you'll still have to add users (NIS takes care of that but that's nother discussion).

SSH (Secure shell) is for logging into a machine securely. You can manipulate the box as much as your permissions allow remotely (via the command line interface).

things like intsalling/removing software, downloading files, ftping...anything. you can even reboot the machine from london if the compuer is in Canada. I've downloaded, configed and compiled kernels remotely then rebooted the machine.

note: if u reboot the machine or "kill" sshd, you loose your connection to the box, compiling a kernel remotely then rebooting and praying that it works is not a good idea, i did it becaue the box was down the hall and i could go fix it if it didnt work.

hope that explains the difference between the 2 a little more clearly. if i left something out, anyone feel free to correct me or add on.

a note on Samba: Samba is more-or-less for sharing files with Windows machines. There is more to Samba than just that but for starting out, that's good enough for now. Think of Samba as a way to see your Linux box in "Network Neighborhood" on your win2k box. (again, it does more but that's the more common use it seems for normal home users).

Last edited by Robert0380; 10-22-2003 at 02:02 AM.
 
Old 10-23-2003, 08:50 PM   #30
flamesrock
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1
Posts: 405

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
thanks!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New user: Want to set up a linux media file server/myth box Disorder Linux - General 2 11-08-2005 11:58 AM
3 nics set up firewall box props666999 Slackware 2 09-11-2005 02:05 PM
How to set up printing to Windows box? Micro420 Ubuntu 4 08-19-2005 04:24 PM
Step-by-step to set up a RedHat Linux box for use as a Windows Server? Hercules Linux - Software 2 11-17-2003 12:16 AM
Is a box set for me? hyperpimp Linux - General 8 06-15-2002 11:59 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:48 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration