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Old 06-16-2008, 02:13 AM   #1
iseeuu
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Registered: Jun 2007
Location: Missouri, USA
Distribution: Debian / Ubuntu / Slackware
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Website Up/Down Monitoring Software


The latest thread here was about two years ago, and I have spent several days googleing for software and trying the apps I found. Can't find what I want.

I would like to know when my hosted website is not available. I was using "siteup", freeware, simple and easy to setup and use. It pings a url, searches for specific text, and saves a log when the site is not available. I would very much like to have an app I can run from my debian box as it is on 24/7.

Just spent a frustrating day trying to use "Wine" to run "siteup" in Linux. Get this, siteup will allow me to configure URLs, check them for the specified text, confirm the sites are up until I close the config window and start to monitor. Then it says it is disconnected form the Internet. AARG

I have googled maybe a hundred apps that monitor or analyze websites and network connections costing from $19.99 to $699.99, which reminds me: When did Open Source and GNU software, called by their authors "Freeware", start having a 30 day trial? I must have downloaded a dozen "Freeware" apps that turned out to be "Trialware" and not free at all. I don't know what these people are thinking, but I would rather drink sewer water that give money to any of these dishonest liars. If they can't be honest with their advertising what makes anyone think their software will do what they say?

I am happy to pay $20.00 for a simple app that does what I want when I can't find any freeware to do the job. But most of the apps I found were way to complicated or involved registering with a web service. Not what I need at all. It has been more than two years since I did any coding, but I might have to try to write something my self. Before I do I want to make sure it hasn't already been written. Any software suggestions?

:})
 
Old 06-16-2008, 02:51 AM   #2
ilikejam
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Hi.

Zabbix is Free, but maybe a bit hardcore for just monitoring whether a site is up or not. Alternatively:
Code:
#!/bin/bash

while true
  do
    if ! wget -O - www.website.com/path/to/page.htm | grep "text you expect"
        then
        echo "Site down at `date`" > /path/to/logfile
    fi
    sleep 600
done
 
Old 06-16-2008, 04:16 AM   #3
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iseeuu View Post
I have googled maybe a hundred apps that monitor or analyze websites and network connections costing from $19.99 to $699.99, which reminds me: When did Open Source and GNU software, called by their authors "Freeware", start having a 30 day trial? I must have downloaded a dozen "Freeware" apps that turned out to be "Trialware" and not free at all. I don't know what these people are thinking, but I would rather drink sewer water that give money to any of these dishonest liars. If they can't be honest with their advertising what makes anyone think their software will do what they say?
Some OSS monitoring packages or suites have "free" (as in beer) versions and they will always compare "free" and paid versions openly. So probably you've been looking at all the wrong places. There's only a few central points on the 'net you need to go to find F/OSS software: your distro's repos, Freshmeat, Sourceforge Savannah and Berlios. As for suggestions, from small (does not imply it's not versatile) to large: Monit, Nagios, OpenNMS. Scripts are nice but usually hard to extend past a certain point.
 
Old 06-18-2008, 10:59 AM   #4
iseeuu
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Registered: Jun 2007
Location: Missouri, USA
Distribution: Debian / Ubuntu / Slackware
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Original Poster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilikejam View Post
Hi.

Zabbix is Free, but maybe a bit hardcore for just monitoring whether a site is up or not. Alternatively:
Code:
#!/bin/bash

while true
  do
    if ! wget -O - www.website.com/path/to/page.htm | grep "text you expect"
        then
        echo "Site down at `date`" > /path/to/logfile
    fi
    sleep 600
done
This is an awesome idea. I was thinking in the line of Java or Javascript. I have done a little coding there. Will add it to my other coding project.

I did get "siteup" to run in "Wine". I had to go the "backport" route to get version 1, manually install all dependencies, and reinstall wine a couple of times. Even so I still want my own app.

:})
 
Old 06-18-2008, 11:13 AM   #5
iseeuu
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Registered: Jun 2007
Location: Missouri, USA
Distribution: Debian / Ubuntu / Slackware
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by unSpawn View Post
Some OSS monitoring packages or suites have "free" (as in beer) versions and they will always compare "free" and paid versions openly.
Yes, you have made a good point. However, I was not confused about the difference between open source and trialware. But to prove myself, I would have to advertise software I wouldn't touch. Not worth the effort.

Quote:
So probably you've been looking at all the wrong places. There's only a few central points on the 'net you need to go to find F/OSS software: your distro's repos, Freshmeat, Sourceforge Savannah and Berlios.
Thanks for the suggestions!

Quote:
As for suggestions, from small (does not imply it's not versatile) to large: Monit, Nagios, OpenNMS. Scripts are nice but usually hard to extend past a certain point.
I tried installing "Nagios", too complicated to configure. Not sure about "Monit" or "OpenNms" so will check them out. Thanks again!

:})
 
Old 06-22-2008, 05:13 PM   #6
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iseeuu View Post
I tried installing "Nagios", too complicated to configure.
No it isn't. Not to be nasty about it but in say ninetynine and some percent trouble starts with people not reading the docs. Anyway, if you still want to try it out you could always ask for assistence.


Quote:
Originally Posted by iseeuu View Post
Not sure about "Monit" or "OpenNms" so will check them out.
Big pro of Monit is it can use includes but handles about everything in one central config file.
 
Old 06-22-2008, 08:52 PM   #7
iseeuu
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Location: Missouri, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unSpawn View Post
No it isn't. Not to be nasty about it but in say ninetynine and some percent trouble starts with people not reading the docs. Anyway, if you still want to try it out you could always ask for assistence.
I find this post of yours, unSpawn, Moderator, very informative. Although I believe you when you said you were not trying to be "nasty" and I take no personal offense even this second time of being told of my "Linux ignorance" (that's how the comments made me feel), your comments clearly identify the difference between the "Linux haves and the have nots". I agree that these forums are populated with people who could do a Google search, search the forums, or go to the app's home website to read the documentation, before posting a question that may have already been answered dozens of times. Personally, I feel that as we gain knowledge we forget what it was like without the knowledge. After all, its not what one knows, or even what one doesn't know, but what one doesn't know he doesn't know that obstructs the gaining of knowledge. By that I mean before one can ask intelligent questions about a topic, he needs to know something first. With software, one needs to have tried to install it before he can seek assistance. Personally, I feel the opensource environment discourages rather than encourages the reading of "docs". There is no single doc container to search. In Debian packages, docs may be html, readme, or man1 through man9 and may have been installed in a dozen different folders. Even if one takes the time to search them out, the authors frequently preface their own doc by saying it is outdated and send the reader to look somewhere else.

With that said, here is what "The Doc" at the home website of "Nagios" says: "Important: Installing and configuring Nagios is rather involved. You can't just compile the binaries, run the program and sit back. There's a lot to setup before you can actually start monitoring anything.", and "Read the documentation. Nagios is difficult enough to configure when you've got a good grasp of what's going on, and nearly impossible if you don't." Now I realize people can form differing opinions sometime based on personal aptitudes and natural skills, but I think when "The Doc" says that Nagios is difficult enough to configure when you've got a good grasp of what's going on, that my description of "complicated" is very reasonable. Your opinion may differ from mine and "The Doc's" author, that doesn't make you 100% correct and every one else 100% wrong.

Also, it seemed to me that "Nagios" was designed to install on one's own server, whereas I only wanted to verify that my website on a remote host owned and operated by someone else stayed up and available. In Windows, installing "siteup" only required clicking the install utility and then providing the urls and text for verification. Getting "Wine" to run the app took much longer (to be expected) but still was no more complicated than providing the urls and text to complete the configuration.

unSpawn, in your role as a "Moderator" (volunteer?), rather than assuming facts not in evidence and phrasing your comments is ways that might be taken as criticism, you could use your advanced knowledge to help us find answers to the questions we don't know we need to ask? (yet?) Without volunteers like you, people like me would never have ventured into the "Linux" world. You have my thanks!

:})

Last edited by iseeuu; 06-22-2008 at 08:53 PM.
 
Old 06-23-2008, 03:16 AM   #8
Dudydoo
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Distribution: I use 'em all ;-)
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Quote:
There is no single doc container to search. In Debian packages, docs may be html, readme, or man1 through man9 and may have been installed in a dozen different folders. Even if one takes the time to search them out, the authors frequently preface their own doc by saying it is outdated and send the reader to look somewhere else.
I absolutely agree with this statement. I hate having to go off and hunt for docs on websites and elsewhere. I think that the man pages should be constantly updated and all documentation should reside in these pages. The *BSD's are good examples of this, especially OpenBSD.

The first think I learn't when I started with Linux was if you didn't know how to do something, 'man' was your friend. I hate packages/tools with little information in or no man pages at all.
 
Old 06-23-2008, 04:41 AM   #9
unSpawn
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I'd be happy to discuss what's wrong with software documentation, comparing incomparable items et cetera but here I think it would be detrimental.
If you still want to try Nagios: just ask for assistence and we'll help you.
That's what my shortest answer amounts to.
 
  


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