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Old 04-22-2008, 01:46 PM   #1
snowman81
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Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Michigan
Distribution: Ubuntu
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using smbfs to mount windows share


Is there anyway to have a normal user mount there own shares? This is a public machine in the school and they log on as a guest. When they do work, I want them to click on the launcher on the desktop and mount their share from a windows server. I put this into a script:
Code:
mount -t smbfs -o username=swu //macx/swu /home/$USER/Desktop/Share
and it works if you have the root password and put sudo in front. Is there any way for them to mount it with their own password?
 
Old 04-22-2008, 04:52 PM   #2
thveillon
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Registered: Dec 2007
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You can configure sudo on the machine to ask for the user password, and grant root privilege only for this command and no other (better security wise).

You need to edit the file /etc/sudoers, it is done in console with the special editor visudo, just type the visudo command as root.

To force sudo to ask for the user password comment out the lines (not needed on every distro, ie. not on Ubuntu) :

#Defaults targetpw # ask for the password of the target user i.e. root
#ALL ALL=(ALL) ALL # WARNING! Only use this together with 'Defaults targetpw'!


just as they are above. Then grant permission for the sudoing user to use the command you want with :

user_login ALL = (root) PASSWD: /bin/mount -t smbfs -o username=swu //macx/swu /home/$USER/Desktop/Share

"user_login" as to be replaced by the allowed users (user1, user2, user3...), "ALL" means from any location, local or remote, "PASSWD" isn't always necessary as it is the default, "NOPASSWD:" would grant permission without asking for a password,then the command you want to allow with full path to the executable since sudo doesn't change the user's PATH variable (command1, command2...).

Hope it helps, as usual "man sudo" is a good idea for there is differences in "sudo" use between distributions.
 
Old 04-22-2008, 04:55 PM   #3
taxtropel
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Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Cascade Mountains WA USA
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actually sudo by default wants the user's password, not root's password

the idea is that the user doesn't know root password and that root has seen to the security.
 
Old 04-22-2008, 04:57 PM   #4
lukost
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Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Gliwice, Poland
Distribution: Any. BSD most often ;-)
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Just put the mount line into /etc/fstab:

//macx/swu /mnt/publicshare smbfs user,rw,noauto,username=swu

note the red "user" option and the green "noauto". First one makes the share mountable by users. The second prevents the system from mounting the share during startup. The drawback is that the directory is mounted in a fixed place (/mnt/publicshare and not user desktop). But why not make a symlink?

There is also a pam module called pam_mount that is used to automatically mount and dismount a specified share for user session. It's highly configurable so you could specify a separate mountpoint for each user. There is a drawback: you have to know what PAM modules are...

Cheers,
lukost
 
Old 04-23-2008, 05:28 AM   #5
thveillon
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Registered: Dec 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxtropel View Post
actually sudo by default wants the user's password, not root's password

the idea is that the user doesn't know root password and that root has seen to the security.
Depends on the distro, try Suse...
 
  


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