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symidran 02-18-2011 05:57 AM

Updating Kernel Doubts
 
Hi

I am running a Fedora 13 x64 . The latest kernel I get is 2.6.34.8 in testing from yumex. However I want to install 2.6.37 How do I do it, without compiling from the source (which I think is beyond my scope at this point)

I am more concerned with this because I am planning to get LMDE for my notebook but I came to know that it runs 2.6.32 kernel, so would I be able to update it ?

There's also the Liquorix kernel that I have read about, with many people saying that its better for daily usage scenarios--is that true , and is there some major difference in code ?

Thanks In Advance.

David1357 02-18-2011 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by symidran (Post 4262540)
How do I do it, without compiling from the source (which I think is beyond my scope at this point)

If you aren't willing to learn how to build your own kernels, then you are stuck with the latest kernels available for your distro.

Having said that, I would encourage you to learn how to build your own kernels. I believe that one of the biggest safety improvements you can make to a distro is build and install your own kernel using the latest sources.

You will get all of the security improvements that are being backported to the kernels available for your distribution plus all of the non-security improvements that are not being backported.

There is some exposure to zero-day exploits, but someone would have to know exactly what kernel source you used to build your kernel to even begin trying to take advantage of zero-day exploits. On the other hand, many of the zero-day exploits that are in your currently running kernel will have already been fixed in the latest kernel source.

Finally, by building and installing your own kernel from the latest source, you decrease the homogeneity of your system. That alone makes it harder to hack your box. Someone may be able to guess your distro and try to take advantage of known exploits for the provided kernels; however, they won't get any traction on your box because you will have a completely different kernel.


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