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-   -   ubuntu can't login as root (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-software-2/ubuntu-cant-login-as-root-431962/)

kristof_v 04-05-2006 08:44 AM

ubuntu can't login as root
 
hi,

how come you can't login as root on ubuntu?
also su - doesn't work.

grtz

reddazz 04-05-2006 08:55 AM

Ubuntu uses sudo instead of a normal root account. You can create a password for root doing "sudo password root" as a normal user (the one who logged in first). If you don't wan't to use sudo, remove the main user from the admin group or run "visudo" and disable all permissions for the admin group to run root privileges.

kristof_v 04-05-2006 11:08 AM

ok sudo passwd root is what i needed.
now i can su - as i am used in debian

grtz

deadlinx 06-05-2006 12:29 PM

what about starting X aplications as root?
 
Hi,

you log-in as normal user, you open a terminal and
you become root, now can you launch X application?

If you digit: "xterm" does it start or you see some
X-errors about priviledges?

In theory if you digit (as root): "xhost +" you'd be
able to run program in X but it doesn't work on my
linuxbox.

Help me please.

deadlinx

angustia 06-05-2006 03:02 PM

what's wrong with sudo?
if you want an admin console run "sudo -s"

reddazz 06-05-2006 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angustia
what's wrong with sudo?
if you wan't a admin console run "sudo -s"

Some (like myself) do not like Ubuntu's implementation of sudo and prefer using the proper root account for sysadmin.

robbbert 06-05-2006 07:14 PM

Quote:

Some (like myself) do not like Ubuntu's implementation of sudo and prefer using the proper root account for sysadmin.
But why? - You can do anything by adding "sudo" before that command?! - I mean, surely you can switch the user (and desktop), change some settings, and switch back. - Nevertheless, what's wrong with "sudo'ing" for some command?

reddazz 06-05-2006 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robbbert
But why? - You can do anything by adding "sudo" before that command?! - I mean, surely you can switch the user (and desktop), change some settings, and switch back. - Nevertheless, what's wrong with "sudo'ing" for some command?

I will speak for myself and not others. Firstly I hate typing sudo in front of every command I want to run. After a while, it becomes tedious especially when I need to run many commands. Also for security reasons I prefer non root users including my normal user login not to have any root privileges.

deadlinx 06-06-2006 06:14 AM

the reason
 
Hi,

I use a root account on Ubuntu Dapper.
The problem is, as I've written that if I
log-in as user and then I use a terminal
as root for starting for example oowriter
it doesn't work at all.

deadlinx

Harlin 06-06-2006 08:30 AM

Wow -- another reason to hate Ubuntu. I doubt I'll ever be using this distro in the near future.

meng 06-06-2006 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Harlin
Wow -- another reason to hate Ubuntu. I doubt I'll ever be using this distro in the near future.

Thanks for sharing. It certainly doesn't make sense for you to use a distro you hate.

reddazz 06-06-2006 11:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deadlinx
Hi,

I use a root account on Ubuntu Dapper.
The problem is, as I've written that if I
log-in as user and then I use a terminal
as root for starting for example oowriter
it doesn't work at all.

deadlinx

Why would you need to run OOo as root?

Harlin 06-06-2006 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meng
Thanks for sharing. It certainly doesn't make sense for you to use a distro you hate.

No worries there. I'm not a big fan of Mark Shuttleworth and I do indeed hate the distro.

Harlin

robbbert 06-06-2006 01:38 PM

Thanks reddazz.
Quote:

Also for security reasons I prefer non root users including my normal user login not to have any root privileges.
In a business environment, I would understand that. But I'm just happy to install (lots of) software and testing some configurations etc. on my private PC. In my situation sudo comes real handy!
Quote:

The last thing the world needs is another flamewar.
That's mean. I'd be in the mood for a little bait. ;)
Anyways, there'd been a time for Stallmans and Thorvalds but now the Shuttleworthes rule da world! ;)

reddazz 06-06-2006 03:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robbbert
Thanks reddazz.

In a business environment, I would understand that. But I'm just happy to install (lots of) software and testing some configurations etc. on my private PC. In my situation sudo comes real handy!

Security should be a priority even in a non business environment. Most of my machines are for personal use and tinkering, but I still prefer a proper root account instead if sudo. I also take security issues seriously because my systems are connected to the net 247.

Sudo is indeed very handy and I suspect that, thats the reason why Ubuntu decided to use it and "disable" the root account. This obviously makes it easy for people migrating from OSes such as windows where most people are used to running as admin. The problem that I see with Ubuntu is that the root account is actually not disabled. Its there but it just doesn't have a password. If someone managed to access your normal user account and password, they could easily enable the full root account and have total control over your system. Obviously this is a worst case scenario and may not happen to most people.


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