LinuxQuestions.org
Did you know LQ has a Linux Hardware Compatibility List?
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-31-2007, 07:54 PM   #1
PureRumble
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Posts: 14

Rep: Reputation: 0
Solution: Resizing a NTFS partition.



***** W A R N I N G *****

THIS IS FRIENDLY ADVICE FROM A USER TO A USER. BUT IF YOU FOLLOW THIS ADVICE THEN YOU ARE DOING SO AT YOUR OWN RISK. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.


As many of you know, resizing (actually making it smaller) a NTFS partition is tricky business. Several users have tried to do this and most of them run into trouble. Programs such Gparted and Partition Magic will simply refuse to start resizing the partition. (Questionable?) Advice, such as doing a defrag first and removing the virtual memory, has been given. I say quesitonable since many users have tried these things and they still can't make the partition smaller.

I was in this exact situation. I had my NTFS partition on roughly 145 gig, and I wanted to reduce this to no greater than 115 gig. I used Gparted and PartitionMagic. Gparted would simply say an error has occured when it had run its simulation and was about to start the real resizing. PartitionMagic would restart Win XP, initialize, play around a bit and suddenly say that too many errors have been encountered.

Finally, I decided that maybe reducing it to 140 gig would do for now. To may surprise, Gparted managed to do this. When it was done, I wondered if it maybe could go down to 135 gig too. This worked just fine too. I continued in the same manner. 130, 125, 120, and so on. Eventually, I reached the point where I only had to reduce it from 115 to 110 gig. I entered the numbers and hit the button. Gparted completed the job. There was now only one thing left to do; restart the system and see if Windows XP had not gone all screwed up on me because of these "baby-step-by-step-reductions"....

You can let go of your breath now since I'm writing this stupid thread in Mozilla running under Win XP ;-)

Do not ask me why this worked. My guess would be that no matter how much you try to reduce the thing, some files have to be reorganized and moved. Trying to do this to files that reach close to 40 gig at one time might be impossible. Maybe it is able to this with only small amounts of files. And as you move on step by step, maybe things get more and more organized on the way.

Now my comp. 100%-ready. I'm sick and tired of Microsoft, and the only reason I had to put myself through this misery is because I want to install Ubuntu! So, now I'm gonna eat some food, then I'm gonna go Linux :-)

Hope this will help you out.

----------

"Love all, trust a few. Do wrong to none."

-- William Shakespeare
 
Old 03-31-2007, 08:58 PM   #2
{BBI}Nexus{BBI}
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Nottingham, UK
Distribution: Mageia 4
Posts: 4,297

Rep: Reputation: 205Reputation: 205Reputation: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by PureRumble
Advice, such as doing a defrag first...
First of all, congratulations on finally achieving your goal.

This is why you should defrag your drive before making changes, the data on the hd is usually scattered all over, defrag will collect the pieces that belong together and put them in sequential order.

I would also add do a chkdsk /f as well to clear up any possible errors on the drive.
 
Old 04-01-2007, 07:51 AM   #3
PureRumble
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Posts: 14

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by {BBI}Nexus{BBI}
First of all, congratulations on finally achieving your goal.

This is why you should defrag your drive before making changes, the data on the hd is usually scattered all over, defrag will collect the pieces that belong together and put them in sequential order.

I would also add do a chkdsk /f as well to clear up any possible errors on the drive.
Friend, that's exactly my point. I had done all those things. I will sum them up here.

1. Defrag
2. Defrag (yes, again)
3. Disable virtual memory
4. Defrag
5. check disk
6. Defrag
7. Defrag

I am not kidding. Every time I did a defrag, it managed to do things a tiny little bit better. But it still did not help. Gparted (as PartitionMagic) refused to reduce the size of the partition from 145 to 110 gig.

It was when I started these baby-step-by-step reductions that things started to flow.

By the way..... now I'm writing this from Ubuntu :-)

----------

"Love all, trust a few. Do wrong to none."

-- William Shakespeare
 
Old 04-01-2007, 10:08 AM   #4
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728
I have a hunch that this relates to how much stuff needs to be moved around to do the re-sizing, how much free space on the disk, and maybe the size of the RAM. Whatever the algorithm being used, it obviously does not report the difficulties it runs into.

I have used GParted to resize several NTFS partitions and never had an issue. But the partitions were nowhere near full (and they were much smaller than 145GB)

Soon you will be so busy solving Linux issues that this experience will seem trivial....
 
Old 04-01-2007, 12:14 PM   #5
Eqwatz
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Slack Puppy Debian DSL--at the moment.
Posts: 341

Rep: Reputation: 30
Your testosterone levels are high. I always image a drive before doing stuff like that. In the end, admittedly, I just use the image program to resize the partition; as I am too paranoid to manipulate partitions without an Image backup.
[I actually paid for my Image program.] I have a record of disaster; on the other hand, I got really good at fixing disasters as a result.

Eqwatz
 
Old 04-01-2007, 08:07 PM   #6
ciotog
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware current
Posts: 727
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 43
I've used ntfsresize along with cfdisk a number of times without any issue whatsoever. I guess if you want to do it the hard way...
 
Old 04-02-2007, 12:48 PM   #7
PureRumble
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Posts: 14

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eqwatz
Your testosterone levels are high. I always image a drive before doing stuff like that. In the end, admittedly, I just use the image program to resize the partition; as I am too paranoid to manipulate partitions without an Image backup.
[I actually paid for my Image program.] I have a record of disaster; on the other hand, I got really good at fixing disasters as a result.

Eqwatz
*Commencing Arnold Schwarzenegger voice* That is for sissies... hargh hargh hargh.

:-)
 
Old 04-02-2007, 01:06 PM   #8
pseudoxiah
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Romania
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10, openSUSE 11.1
Posts: 31

Rep: Reputation: 15
a sollution that worked for me, but i stress it is VERY INSECURE was resizing my partition using gparted and initially losing all of my data. then i used a program called Active@ Partition Recovery which is a tool that boots from a floppy disk and recovered my lost partition. all lost data was in their place, the only issue was that the new ext3 partition created from the free space remaining and the recovered ntfs partition were overlapping, which could be resolved by gparted. i insist that i only tried this ONCE and it sounds risky, so try it as an eperiment first
 
Old 04-02-2007, 01:47 PM   #9
jay73
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
One thing I've noticed is that XP is more vulnerable to these things than XP64 (no idea about Vista). I was able to shrink my XP64 partition from 233GB to only 35 without any issue whatsoever. It also allows renaming partitions on the fly (except C of course). Trying either on XP 32 bit, on the other hand, has always been a nightmare as it always seems to find something to whine about.
 
Old 04-02-2007, 11:39 PM   #10
Junior Hacker
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: North America
Distribution: Debian testing Mandriva Ubuntu
Posts: 2,687

Rep: Reputation: 59
I have never had a problem re-sizing an NTFS partition with bootitng. I have done bench mark testing before and after de-fragmentation of an NTFS partition and will not "de-frag" an NTFS partition ever again based on performance tests. When XP says certain files cannot be moved during a de-frag, is pure hogwash. When I look at free space within XP, then re-size the partition with bootitng, I can bring it down to near the amount of used space reported by XP, meaning the files that cannot be moved by XP's de-frag, can be moved by bootitng and XP boots up and run normally after the re-size.
If you believe everything you hear on TV, you probably believe everything Microsoft tells you also (marketing specialists).

PS: You need 15% free space in a Windows partition for de-fragmentation.
 
Old 04-02-2007, 11:58 PM   #11
Junior Hacker
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: North America
Distribution: Debian testing Mandriva Ubuntu
Posts: 2,687

Rep: Reputation: 59
pseudoxiah

Any data written to a hard drive will stay there after being deleted/moved, re-formatting does not affect the data written in each sector, it only omits access to it, same as the OS that deleted it. Using data carving utilities such as foremost or photorec, you can access all data not overwritten by new files (un-allocated sectors/clusters) independent of the format structure which is just a directory structure to help an OS find the files it's looking for. Meaning, after a file has been deleted, it will not be "showed" to you, even if it is still there, till something else is written to those "un-allocated" sectors, which could be a long time down the road on a large drive.
 
Old 04-03-2007, 12:59 PM   #12
sn9ke_eyes
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Texas
Distribution: slackware 11
Posts: 90

Rep: Reputation: 15
I've used gparted successfully in the past, however for some reason the last time I did it, it worked on the partitions for drive 1, but on the second drive it locked up the whole system.
 
Old 04-03-2007, 01:45 PM   #13
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,027
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I've resized the Windows NTFS partition on my comparatively small HD (40GB) many times using QParted on Knoppix with no problems.It's been up & down like a yoyo - 12GB, 20GB, 28GB, full. I always use the recommended method: disable pagefile, reboot, defragment, resize.
At the moment it's about 20GB ,with a 5GB FAT32 partition, and Kubuntu/Xubuntu on the remainder.

Last edited by brianL; 04-03-2007 at 01:53 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
error resizing NTFS partition with gParted live CD Nived87 Linux - Newbie 5 05-29-2006 01:53 AM
I Need Help Resizing NTFS partition fatenabu Linux - Distributions 1 12-04-2005 01:47 AM
Safely resizing NTFS partition jnsg Linux - General 9 01-12-2005 11:35 PM
Reliable partition resizing utils (that work w/ NTFS) suprpenguin04 Linux - General 2 09-15-2004 10:22 AM
NTFS Partition Resizing darkangel Linux - General 13 08-04-2002 12:38 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:27 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration