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Old 10-15-2008, 08:36 AM   #1
Xolo
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Searching files in Konqueror - How, with what?


Hello.

I am sure this is an old subject, but searching the forums did not bring enlightenment either I must be cursed today.

I find myself in need of file search after going without for a long time.
But now that I do need it, i'm encountering some stumblers;

1. Using KDE 3.x as the window manager
2. Beagle is installed and active.
3. Locate is installed, but seems to be broken (only produces errors).
4. From within Konqueror, using either Locate/Beagle/Google from the left-hand pane under 'More...' always results in a warning stating i'm about to send data unencrypted to the internet, which apparently is.. "http://www.ask.co.uk", which also errors out (timeout, unknown host) because I am behind a proxy which is not configured in Konqueror, I use Firefox if I want to browse the web.

All I wanted was to search for was evil Thumbs.db files generated by Windows XP in folders containing pictures, select these and delete them.
I am missing functionality, or I am not seeing it. How does one mimick the search utility that is included in Windows, where one can manipulate files returned as search results from within the search results? Beagle is apparently not capable of doing this (it lists, but you can't select or manipulate files), and Konqueror won't even search at all unless it is on "http://www.ask.co.uk", and you can bet your limo that Jeeves can't look in my home folder from where he is located.

Any advice appreciated, thank you in advance.
 
Old 10-15-2008, 10:55 AM   #2
rolf
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I've got 'Find file..' in the 'Tools' menu at the top. Shortcut is Ctrl-F. It brings up a Search dialog to input search terms and choose path. I can right-click on a result and get a context menu that has 'Delete'.

Beagle is not required for this and I have some misgivings about having beagle installed as it has a record of tying up the cpu from time to time, when it indexes, I believe.
 
Old 10-15-2008, 04:58 PM   #3
clindo
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Is there a reason why you aren't just doing this from the command line? Assuming you don't already know this, you could run

find [dir_name] -name "Thumbs.db" -print -exec rm -iv {} \;

This would find all files named Thumbs.db (case sensitive), print the path relative to [dir_name] and ask you if you want to delete them.
 
Old 10-16-2008, 06:20 AM   #4
Xolo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rolf View Post
I've got 'Find file..' in the 'Tools' menu at the top. Shortcut is Ctrl-F. It brings up a Search dialog to input search terms and choose path. I can right-click on a result and get a context menu that has 'Delete'.

Beagle is not required for this and I have some misgivings about having beagle installed as it has a record of tying up the cpu from time to time, when it indexes, I believe.
I totally missed that when I went through the menus Thanks for reminding me, the offending files have been found and deleted.

I have read about the Beagle gripes, and while I can't say I notice it being present at all.. it's usefulness seems to be (too?) limited for me, and I may just consider removing it completely if it does not ruin the search bar I have in the KDE Menu right now. I doubt it will, so off it goes.
 
Old 10-16-2008, 06:55 AM   #5
Xolo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clindo View Post
Is there a reason why you aren't just doing this from the command line? Assuming you don't already know this, you could run

find [dir_name] -name "Thumbs.db" -print -exec rm -iv {} \;

This would find all files named Thumbs.db (case sensitive), print the path relative to [dir_name] and ask you if you want to delete them.
Yes, there is, or are, actually.
On one hand, I would have never came up with that kind of string of commands myself without grabbing some example off these forums and trying it out to see what happens. Now, of course when something goes wrong here I can blame myself.

And on the other hand..
While what you suggest is useful, it is also far too cryptic (and potentially dangerous) to pass on to others.
That is mostly because 99.99% of the people I have around me are Windows users, of which only 1 is a Mac user at home, and I am 1 of 2 Linux users (And he is more savvy than I am, I admit). Myself and the 1 other Linux user aside, none of them ever have touched a CLI or even heard of it. Sad perhaps, but that's reality.
So.. when I do not understand something I have to follow the KISS rule, so I may pass on what I learn during idle conversation over a cup of coffee.
And find /home/user/junk -name "Thumbs.db" -print -exec rm -iv {} \; makes people spray their coffee at me
 
Old 10-16-2008, 07:04 AM   #6
craigevil
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Not everyone knows how to use CLI or even cares to learn it. Desktops are GUI people need to accept that and stop spouting CLI commands at others when they ask how to do something with a GUI.

Hell I have ran Debian Sid since 2004 and I haven't a clue how to use find, sed or any of those other esoteric commands. While CLI is faster and more powerful if you know how to use it, GUI apps are just as effective these days.

Like OP stated CLI wouldnt have been helpful, plus it isn't really a great idea to use commands unless you know what the heck they are going to do. This is the 21st century desktops are bright and full of eye candy, and filled with loads of GUI apps.
 
Old 10-16-2008, 08:07 PM   #7
clindo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xolo View Post
Yes, there is, or are, actually.

While what you suggest is useful, it is also far too cryptic (and potentially dangerous) to pass on to others.
That is mostly because 99.99% of the people I have around me are Windows users,
Hush. I didn't know this was for general distribution to the user community... they would probably quote it in red ink on your performance review
 
Old 10-17-2008, 01:54 AM   #8
Xolo
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Originally Posted by clindo View Post
Hush. I didn't know this was for general distribution to the user community... they would probably quote it in red ink on your performance review
Hehe
I always work a double plan when dealing in Linux. Self education and that of others, eventually (and without coffee spray, hopefully)
 
Old 10-17-2008, 02:18 PM   #9
replica9000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigevil View Post
Not everyone knows how to use CLI or even cares to learn it. Desktops are GUI people need to accept that and stop spouting CLI commands at others when they ask how to do something with a GUI.

Hell I have ran Debian Sid since 2004 and I haven't a clue how to use find, sed or any of those other esoteric commands. While CLI is faster and more powerful if you know how to use it, GUI apps are just as effective these days.

Like OP stated CLI wouldnt have been helpful, plus it isn't really a great idea to use commands unless you know what the heck they are going to do. This is the 21st century desktops are bright and full of eye candy, and filled with loads of GUI apps.
As nice as the GUI apps are, I still find some things work better in CLI. Not all GUI apps use the full potential of a program as their CLI counterpart.
 
  


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