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Old 07-09-2006, 01:39 AM   #16
daihard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cs-cam
Maybe you could install a more recent distro that would probably have a package for the nvidia driver making it a lot easier to install. Redhat 9 was released in 2003 which in computing terms is very old.
Well, IMO, installing an nVidia driver from www.nvidia.com isn't too much difficult than installing an RPM.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 01:55 AM   #17
zetabill
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@ Naperian:

I would have to agree with rkelsen and cs-cam. Unless there is some specific reason for running Red Hat 9, then go with something newer.

If you're even remotely attracted to the Red Hat brand, I would certainly go with Red Hat's Fedora Core 5. Fedora Core 5 will, at some point in the future, become one of their officially supported Red Hat distros. So you'll find a lot of help here and elsewhere on the net specific to Fedora. Plus Fedora is not insanely difficult to use as some others. I personally used Fedora Core for quite a few months and used it to get a fantastic understanding of Linux before I switched to something "ever-so-slightly more" challenging than Fedora. And like most distros, it is free!

In my experience reading the forums and through doing it myself, the two "newbie distros" that most people seem to endorse are Fedora and Ubuntu. Judging from your posts, you would do well with either one of these distros. If you want to see what you are up against, their corresponding guides can be found at www.fedorafaq.org and www.ubuntuguide.org.

You'll find what you're looking for. You may peruse the various distros and download them from the "Download Linux" link in the main menu (top right of this page).

Before you "dive in" and come to us with 20 billion questions, I would suggest reading something like RUTE:
http://www.chongluo.com/books/rute/

or maybe something like the Linux Cookbook:
http://dsl.org/cookbook/cookbook_toc.html

I personally like RUTE a little better, and if you google "rute pdf" you can find an acrobat file that you could download and read offline if you wish. It starts from the most basic of information (like what a CPU is) and works its way through some intense Linux knowledge that you will find invaluable someday. Don't be turned off by how long the book is, just skip the parts about what a CPU is, why computers have RAM, and such topics...

As far as your NVIDIA problem, you're trying to factor x^2+6x+9 before you can add 14+7. Once you get through less than half of RUTE, you will know - unequivocally - how to install your NVIDIA drivers. I really don't mean to sound harsh... but you were told how to do it, and you expressed severe confusion. I understand the frustration.

Here is how I did it when I had Fedora:
- In a console:
Code:
su -c "init 3"
and enter root's password.
- If you don't get a prompt, then ALT+F1.
---->If THAT doesn't get you a prompt, then CTRL+ALT+F2. You should definitely get one now.
- Log in as root and go to the directory where your nvidia file is and do as nadroj explained earlier in the post. I'm not going to repeat it as nadroj explained it just fine.

Not to say this is the only possible way to do it; I only offered this as the example of how I got out of X to work in the command line.

I hope this helps you. Don't give up yet, your adventure has just started. And take it from my own experience learning Linux, be patient. It's not like Windows, you have to learn and search and learn and search. Like riding a bicycle you will fall off and scrape a few kneecaps, but once you can do it you won't have any fear to ride it. LQ is here to help you back up, though.

Good luck.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 02:10 AM   #18
cs-cam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daihard
Well, IMO, installing an nVidia driver from www.nvidia.com isn't too much difficult than installing an RPM.
Unless you're on a distro that doesn't install compilers and kernel headers by default.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 02:12 AM   #19
daihard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zetabill
Fedora Core 5 will, at some point in the future, become one of their officially supported Red Hat distros.
Would you mind elaborating on this? It is my understanding that Fedora Core has always been, and will always be, Red Hat's experimental distro on which they build their flagship Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 02:46 AM   #20
zetabill
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Red face 3:46am

Quote:
Originally Posted by daihard
Would you mind elaborating on this? It is my understanding that Fedora Core has always been, and will always be, Red Hat's experimental distro on which they build their flagship Red Hat Enterprise Linux.


I've been awake far too long today.

That is what I was getting at, but I gave a poor explanation. When I was writing I just "knew" they would be incorporating it into future releases and didn't think to elaborate. Sorry!


No more posting until I get sleep... I'm cutting myself off!

 
Old 07-09-2006, 11:02 AM   #21
Naperian
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Thanks for all your comments. I spend yesterday tons of time with no suscess. I cannot modify the inittab file. Can somebody tell me how to set myself as "owner" from the console?

I downloaded Fedora core on iso file, but I need to utility for extraction. Any suggestions?

Thank folks for you inputs.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 11:09 AM   #22
Naperian
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One last question:

Do Fedora Core run on AMD based systems? I read that it was designed to Pentiums.

Thanks
 
Old 07-09-2006, 11:24 AM   #23
nadroj
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Quote:
Thanks for all your comments. I spend yesterday tons of time with no suscess. I cannot modify the inittab file.
as i said. use 'su' to have access to modify it. look up how to use 'su' on a search engine if you dont understand please.

Last edited by nadroj; 07-09-2006 at 08:49 PM.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 08:47 PM   #24
zetabill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naperian
Do Fedora Core run on AMD based systems? I read that it was designed to Pentiums.
http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/fedora...-guide-en/fc5/ is the offical fedora documentation.

More specifically, from that install guide: http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/fedora...hitecture.html
Quote:
2. Understanding i386 and Other Computer Architectures

The Fedora Project provides versions of Fedora Core for PCs, and also for a range of other machines that are based on different technologies. Each version of Fedora Core is built for computers that are based on a specific architecture. All 32-bit PCs are based on the i386 architecture. You may also install versions of Fedora Core on computers that are based on x86_64 or ppc technology. The architectures are explained below:

i386

Intel x86-compatible processors, including Intel Pentium and Pentium-MMX, Pentium Pro, Pentium-II, Pentium-III, Celeron, Pentium 4, and Xeon; VIA C3/C3-m and Eden/Eden-N; and AMD Athlon, AthlonXP, Duron, AthlonMP, and Sempron

ppc

PowerPC processors, such as those found in Apple Power Macintosh, G3, G4, and G5, and IBM pSeries systems

x86_64

64-bit AMD processors such as Athlon64, Turion64, Opteron; and Intel 64-bit processors such as EM64T
---------------
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naperian
I downloaded Fedora core on iso file, but I need to utility for extraction. Any suggestions?
Extraction? Firstly, I'm assuming you are planning to burn a DVD, if you not you should have 5 or 6 of them. Check the installation instructions that I linked to at the beginning of my post. When you get a few sections in, it explains it for you. In a nutshell, you don't extract them. They're images of what should be on a CD. If you have the DVD iso, you burn the file to a DVD-R. If you have the CD isos, then you burn them to CD-Rs. The installation instructions link to http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/l...isks-cdrw.html which is from the Red Hat 9 User's Manual explaining how to burn an ISO file. If you're burning from Windows, Roxio and Nero can do it, but make sure you select the menu option "Create from ISO..." or something like it. They aren't burned like a normal project. Ultimately, Google will have your answers.

Please read the installation instructions that I linked at the beginning of the post. You will have so few questions and spend such less time with all of it.

Consider this an extended reading requirement, in addition to the RUTE book I linked to earlier. Here is the PDF file: http://ploug.eu.org/doc/rute.pdf

You should be able to right-click on that link and select "Save Link As..."

Flip through RUTE and get the basics down. Once Fedora gets up and running, you should be able to get a decent working version of Fedora up and running before you start to run into specific problems that need a little probing. I couldn't be any more serious about knowing what to do after reading some of that book. You will thank me in the future.

--------------
Quote:
Originally Posted by nadroj
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naperian
Thanks for all your comments. I spend yesterday tons of time with no suscess. I cannot modify the inittab file.
as i said. use 'su' to have access to modify it. look up how to use 'su' on a search engine if you dont understand please.
Google: "linux su"
You'll get more than you need.
Also...
"su" and "su -" are explained on page 137 of rute.pdf - User Accounts and Ownerships

Anything you don't know about can be found online. Linux, as a whole, is among the largest internet collaboratives on the planet. There is no better or no more basic an interface than the Google search engine.

The most reading that you'll have to do is when you first start using Linux. After that you either know it yourself, know where to look for stuff, or you can simply figure it out. It's not bad, really, once you climb the first hill.

Good Luck!
 
Old 07-09-2006, 09:00 PM   #25
Naperian
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I have been struggling all day long. I just got enought used parts to put together a PC and decided to use Linux instead of buying XP home for $94. I am starting to regret it.

I realized that I made a quick and dirty basic installation, w/ no administration tools. I reinstalled the entire software on the three cd's.

When I got to the administratives tools, I cannot put myself as owner in order to modify the inittab file.

With regards the "su", I will explain it again: I go to the console, type su, enter the root password and I am log as root. But, this do not translate into the X GUI, since I cannot modify the file directly in the etc folder.

I guess that, as in DOS, you may modify, copy/paste/delete files with the appropriate commands. In this case, I dont know the appropriates commands to modify the file and the "init 1" type after log as root simply don't work. Tells me "unknown command" message.

I will revised again your message to see as well as the other references and links.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 09:11 PM   #26
nadroj
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so you have successfully used 'su' to switch to the root user? after doing this, open the file you want to edit with any text editor, like 'program /path/to/fileName' for example... or more specifically: 'vi /etc/inittab'. 'vi' is a powerful console text editor, but is not an intuitive editor for a newcomer. for editing this file vi should be fine.. look up a quick intro tutorial/guide to vi online, there will be hundreds im sure.

after you 'vi /etc/inittab', press 'i'. this will allow you to edit the file. use the arrow keys to scroll to the line you want and edit the line accordingly. then press 'ESC', ':x' [enter]. this will write the changes, and exit the program. after that type 'exit' to exit from 'su' (root) so you dont accidently run a command as root and break something.

it may be advisable to make a backup of the inittab file if you dont feel confident in editing it, so you have something to revert back to. run (again after 'su' [root priveleges]) 'cp /etc/inittab /etc/inittab.bak'

good luck!
 
Old 07-09-2006, 09:17 PM   #27
spooon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daihard
Well, IMO, installing an nVidia driver from www.nvidia.com isn't too much difficult than installing an RPM.
Nvidia's and ATI's installers mess up stuff in Fedora Core. It is recommended not to use those and instead use the packages from Livna.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 09:55 PM   #28
Naperian
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Finally....

Ok, folks. Let explain in plain english for future newbies.

1. Login as "root" and enter password (using X login screen)

2. Using the text editor, change the inittab file to 1.

3. Reboot

4. On console, type su and then the root password

5. Execute the driver by typing sh "file name".

6. Follow instructions.

7. When log again, on the console type su and init 5.

8. Boot will continue normally.

9. Log as root.

10. Modify the inittab file back to X11 using the text editor.

As a final note, the Video card is an EVGA 5200 256MB. Suprisely, Linux did not recognized as a nvidia chipset and use by default VESA generic driver. So, I still in 800 X 600 resolution so after all this, I cannot improve my PC apperance despite that it using a Nvidia driver.

I will appreciate any comment about this.

Thanks U all of the asistance. I will not buy WIN XP.
 
Old 07-09-2006, 10:04 PM   #29
nadroj
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ok thanks for the simple layout for the steps you took.. glad you could get that installed.

when you login is there a white NVIDIA splash screen that loads? this is usually the easiest indication that its working.

post your /etc/X11/XF86Config file too please.. its likely that we have to edit this file.
 
Old 07-16-2006, 01:18 AM   #30
c5f8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naperian
Linux did not recognized as a nvidia chipset and use by default VESA generic driver.
Naperian, I think you almost solved your problem.

1) At the beginning of this thread you found out that NVIDIA-installer must be run as root.
2) When in the GUI login (i.e. init 5), trying to kill X via <Ctrl> + <Alt> + <backspace> will restart the GUI login screen.
Need to edit /etc/inittab and change 5 to 3 (I like to use the vi editor).
3) Or you could switch to init 3 using zetabill method. 1st) [ctrl] [alt] F1, 2nd) login as root, 3rd) su -c "init 3"
4) At your last post you were able to execute the driver by typing sh "file name".

Then you said "Linux did not recognized as a NVIDIA chipset and use by default VESA generic driver".
Well sometimes I notice that NVIDIA drivers need to be loaded several times to finally work. XP also has problems.

Use this link along with your above steps and do it about 5 - 10 times.
http www linuxforums org /forum/ linux-tutorials-howtos-reference-material/ 33102-howto-install-nvidia-3d-drivers.html
(The complete address not listed because You cannot post URLs to other sites until you have made at least 3 posts.)

Eventual the video driver will install. I recently had to install Scientific Linux 4.3 x86_64 onto a new AMD Athlon 64 and I had to repeat the installation several times. Then it worked and recognized the video card as a GeForce 6200.
 
  


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