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Old 09-23-2003, 02:09 PM   #1
ASSFAULT_RACIN
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Newbie trying to install software


I'm all new at this so be gentle. I'm tring to install some software. Some vi software and as a windows guru we all have .exe or .msi. In general how do you install software in Linux. I'm running Red Hat 9. Is there a general type of extension that you run to install software?

What software of Linux is good to learn on? Red Hat, Mandrake 9.1, FreeBSD?

What is the differents (major or minor) about Linux and Unix?

Thanks for your time and help...
 
Old 09-23-2003, 02:25 PM   #2
jpbarto
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All Linux is good to learn on. To install software on Linux you have basically two choices ... from source or from precompiled binary. As you are more used to .exe etc perhaps you would be more comfortable starting with RPM files. Typically software is available in RPM format. You download the RPM file and use the rpm utility (command) to install the software.

(typically along the lines of a command such as 'rpm -i <my new software>.rpm')

hope that helps,
jpbarto
 
Old 09-23-2003, 02:44 PM   #3
Micro420
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*.exe = *.RPM in linux. Just double click the file and hopefully it'll install itself (assuming you're in some graphical environment).

*.tar you have to self extract and do all these funky commands in the console. <---- avoid these if possible - try get the RPM's. (www.rpmfind.net)
 
Old 09-23-2003, 03:04 PM   #4
jpbarto
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Ah now come on Micro420, I'll give you that RPM's do allow a greater ease to installing software. However you have to admit that building from source has its advantages. Such as customization, (installing only the features of an app you need / want), optimization, (many RPM's are built for the i386 architecture so to be very processor compatible where as building from source could allow you build specifically for the i586 or 686 architecture). Plus building from source isn't really that hard ... ./configure && make && make install

I'm just saying that I don't think advice like 'avoid them at all costs' is really necessary or prudent.

< but then again that's an argument for a whole 'nother thread >

jpbarto
 
Old 09-23-2003, 05:18 PM   #5
Micro420
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Quote:
Originally posted by jpbarto
Ah now come on Micro420, I'll give you that RPM's do allow a greater ease to installing software. However you have to admit that building from source has its advantages. Such as customization, (installing only the features of an app you need / want), optimization, (many RPM's are built for the i386 architecture so to be very processor compatible where as building from source could allow you build specifically for the i586 or 686 architecture). Plus building from source isn't really that hard ... ./configure && make && make install

I'm just saying that I don't think advice like 'avoid them at all costs' is really necessary or prudent.

< but then again that's an argument for a whole 'nother thread >

jpbarto
I have no idea what you're talking about customizing and optimization and architecture. And I never told him to avoid it all costs, but to avoid it if it's possible. Why work harder when you can get similar results with less work?

I just want to double click, install, and BAM! have it work. Simplicity is nice for linux-illiterate people like me. Perhaps there are others like me out there..... I hope

Last edited by Micro420; 09-23-2003 at 05:20 PM.
 
Old 09-23-2003, 05:25 PM   #6
zroth
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Re: Newbie trying to install software

Quote:
[Is there a general type of extension that you run to install software?

What software of Linux is good to learn on? Red Hat, Mandrake 9.1, FreeBSD?

What is the differents (major or minor) about Linux and Unix?

Thanks for your time and help... [/B]
the other guys hit the RPM item for software packages. RPM is closer to .msi IMO similar to using WISE to create custom packages for installations for wintel machines.

If you are moving from windows to linux, I would say RH is your best bet. They have taken the greatest steps toward making a smooth transition specifically for windows users.

Each distro has some unique features but are each pretty much the same. At first you will ease into it heavy on the gui then move more towards the traditional command line.

RedHat Bible is a good book to start with for an nice high level view of every thing on the redhat ditro.

Linux is great, period. You can do no wrong with any version of it.
 
Old 09-23-2003, 05:31 PM   #7
codec
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the double click in linux is:
apt-get install [software]

most of the time I perfer a optimized RPM (for easy uninstall) or just build one myself. It is not so difficult.

Last edited by codec; 09-23-2003 at 05:35 PM.
 
Old 09-23-2003, 05:50 PM   #8
jpbarto
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Micro420 I think somewhere else you had posted about some people actually enjoying arguing with config scripts and what not... well that's me. I built one of the LFS systems just to make sure every package was optimized for my specific hardware (I know... I have too much time on my hands). So I am probably a little biased, but I would agree that for first timers RPMs are the way to go. I got started on Mandrake myself and moved onto Slackware about a year after that.

jpbarto

p.s. sorry for the misquote
 
Old 10-01-2003, 09:46 PM   #9
narshadda
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Hey ASSFAULT_RACIN,

I am a newbie as well and I understand your pain brother. I found "Linux for Windows Administrators" by Mark Minasi very helpful. (If you know windows, I am sure you have read something by Mark Minasi in the past, he is the "man".) Even though he wrote the book using RH 7.3, applying the knowledge to RH 9 is easy.
Shoot me an email if you want to trade stories...
r0mer0e@bellsouth.net
 
Old 10-01-2003, 11:08 PM   #10
shanenin
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RPM's have been a pain in the a@# for me. I have to admit using up2date(an rpm based service) is really great. When I tried installing mplayer by RPM I got so many dependencies it was next to impossible. I just installed it from source, it went smooth(this was my first attempt at compiling). Mozilla 1.4 also had many dependencies. When I installed the .tar using the built in installer it was very easy also. That is my opinion.
 
Old 10-02-2003, 01:47 AM   #11
mossy
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RPM
install
rpm -ivh [thepackage].rpm
upgrade
rpm -Uvh [thepackage].rpm

TAR.SH
tar -xvf [thepackage]tar.sh
sh [thepackage].sh
 
  


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