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Old 04-29-2003, 05:12 PM   #1
hamster
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mySQL vs oracle 8/9i


Can anyone tell me if mySQL can be used for simple select statements from a few tables for testing/sampling etc. I have never used mySQL before and I'm wondering is it a bit like SQL*PLUS from Oracle (with/out a physical database) ?
 
Old 04-29-2003, 05:15 PM   #2
Crashed_Again
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Check out www.mysql.com . To answer your question yes, you can do that and much more.
 
Old 04-29-2003, 05:16 PM   #3
hamster
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Crashed_Again, thanks for your rapid response!
 
Old 04-29-2003, 08:21 PM   #4
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However, it fails to have a few essential
features of the BIG ones in the business,
namely:
- transactions
- subselects
- triggers
- stored procedures

If you are looking for a full-fledged GPLed
SQL Database that can compete with some
of the commercial systems look at

http://www.postgresql.org/


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 04-29-2003, 08:44 PM   #5
nakkaya
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but with the innodb support default in version 4.0 mysql gives these acid support like oracle.btw does postgresql has c++ api?
 
Old 04-29-2003, 08:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
but with the innodb support default in version 4.0 mysql gives these acid support like oracle.
Could you please reword this in English?

Quote:
btw does postgresql has c++ api?
Of course it has ...
and Java and Perl and Tcl and Python...

Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 04-29-2003, 09:27 PM   #7
nakkaya
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innodb support was experimental in 3.23 with the release of 4.0 mysql included innodb engine (innodb is a table type) default innodb supports the following taken from www.innodb.com

Features of the InnoDB database

Look also at the TODO list for InnoDB.

Note that not all features of InnoDB are available from MySQL. If a feature is not available under MySQL, there is a special note on that in the list below.

Some third-party products running on MySQL/InnoDB.

MySQL/InnoDB provides full ACID support of transactions (A = Atomicity, C = Consistency, I = Isolation, D = Durability).

Supported platforms:

* Currently runs on Windows NT/2000/XP, Windows 95/98/ME, Linux Intel x86, Linux Compaq Alpha, Linux PowerPC, Linux zSeries, Mac OS X PowerPC, Solaris Sparc, Solaris x86, HP-UX PA-RISC, AIX RS6000, SCO Intel, FreeBSD Intel.

Embedded server library:

* MySQL/InnoDB-4.0 is available also as an embedded server library which you can link into your application; this gives easier use, and better performance because the process switches present in client/server setups are eliminated.

Indexes:

* foreign key constraints, also with ON DELETE CASCADE and ON UPDATE CASCADE actions;
* clustering in the Sybase style (clustering in the Oracle style not available under MySQL);
* unique and nonunique indexes.

Locking:

* consistent read of Oracle implemented: the database is multiversioned and readers can read old data setting no locks, and thus not delaying updates; multiversioning is achieved through 'rollback segments' like in Oracle, but in the InnoDB implementation there should not be similar problems with them as in Oracle;
* row level locks which fit in a small space: no lock escalation needed;
* next-key locking used: no 'phantoms' occur, and transactions are serializable, thus better than in Oracle;
* all SQL-1992 isolation levels READ UNCOMMITTED, READ COMMITTED, REPEATABLE READ, and SERIALIZABLE available;
* table level locks;
* automatic deadlock detection;
* lock monitor helps diagnosing application locking problems;
* semaphore contention reduced by several methods.

Transactions:

* commit, parallel rollback, savepoints. (Savepoints not yet available through MySQL.)

Log:

* log system similar to Oracle: no need to keep lot of log on-line, even with long running transactions, because rollback is done using rollback segments;
* group commit of transactions;
* log mirroring (not available under MySQL);
* asynchronous archiving (not available through MySQL which uses its own binlog);
* roll-forward recovery from a checkpoint or a backup.

Checkpoints:

* asynchoronous, fuzzy checkpoint.

Buffer pool:

* asynchronous i/o;
* sequential read-ahead;
* semaphore contention reduced by several methods.

File space management:

* tablespaces like in Oracle (currently only one tablespace under MySQL);
* space within tablespaces managed like in Unix Fast File System;
* database page sizes configurable 4-64 kB, default 16 kB;
* maximum tablespace size 4 billion pages.

Insert buffering:

* inserts to secondary indexes are buffered in main memory if the indexes do not fit in the buffer pool, later they are merged in batches to save disk i/o.

SQL:

* a small interpreter with a stored procedure syntax like in Oracle, no SQL optimizer (not available through MySQL which uses its own optimizing SQL interpreter, and will have stored procedures in MySQL-5.0).

Performance monitoring:

* InnoDB Monitor outputs detailed information of the database state, which helps in performance tuning.

Backups:

* hot online backups similar to Oracle.

Main memory management:

* through the 'buddy' algorithm, avoiding fragmentation.

ODBC:

* a small subset of the ODBC interface (under MySQL you use MySQL's much more complete ODBC interface).

Communications:

* through shared memory (not available through MySQL).

Embeddability:

* easily embeddable; InnoDB has been embedded under an SQL relational database, boosting the performance of the whole DBMS and adding new capabilities to the whole DBMS

Source code portability:

* the database is written in ANSI C
* OS-dependent code isolated in a directory with some 6000 lines of C;
* machine-dependent code isolated to a directory with some 500 lines of C;
* code is modularly written comprising around 50 compilation modules.

General:

* multithreaded, tested on a 10-processor SMP machine

Size:

* 140 000 lines of C; 800 kB exe on Intel.
 
Old 04-29-2003, 09:40 PM   #8
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In other words:
MySQL is slowly catching up ;)
but still way behind :D

Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 04-29-2003, 09:43 PM   #9
nakkaya
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yeah but gonna catch it
 
Old 04-29-2003, 09:52 PM   #10
hamster
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Thanks for the pointing out PostgreSQL to me. Downloading ver 7.3.2 now.
 
Old 04-29-2003, 09:55 PM   #11
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Pleasure mate :)

Cheers,
Tink
 
  


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