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free_andrew 12-08-2003 11:05 AM

Installing multiple RPM Packages
 
After finally getting my head around the concept of RPM, I've come across a situation which wasn't explained in the RPM HOWTO.

How does one go about installing multiple RPM's? For example, the latest KDE desktop has a crap-load of RPMS...am I supposed to do RPM -ivh <package> for each and every one? Is there a *.RPM command or something like that which takes care of the whole thing? I've already tried referrring to the directory, but that doesn't seem to work.

Help. :Pengy:

hw-tph 12-08-2003 11:12 AM

You can try rpm -ivh *.rpm. That will make rpm try to install all the rpms in the directory. Sometimes you need to do it twice because of dependencies (although that might have changed since it has been a few years since I used RedHat).

Håkan

free_andrew 12-08-2003 11:20 AM

Why is there so much variety in the types of installation files? KDE installs as an RPM package. Netscape can be installed by running the installation script. What's up with that? :confused:

frogman 12-08-2003 11:35 AM

yeah, you can do.

cd to/your/kde/packages/directory/

su to root, then

rpm -ivh *.rpm <--------- will install everything in the current directory (and prompt if you're missing parts)

rpm -Uvh *.rpm <----------will upgrade existing packages and install those not already installed

rpm -Fvh *.rpm <----------will only upgrade installed packages. Useful if you've got an "patches" cd or directory.

hw-tph 12-08-2003 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by free_andrew
Why is there so much variety in the types of installation files? KDE installs as an RPM package. Netscape can be installed by running the installation script. What's up with that? :confused:
It's because the developers have made different choices. Not all distributions are rpm-based - many common distros like Debian, Slackware and Gentoo do not use the rpm package management system. rpm isn't the only package management system, and it's not the best, only the most common.

So if you are going to distribute [i]one[/b] binary package that will install on all compatible systems, you can make a simple installer (or use the Loki installer, etc), or tar the files and put some instructions in the INSTALL file. This has a big upside for the developer as it limits the support generated and they can focus on writing good instructions for the one way there is installing the program. If you were to distribute your program (or whatever it is) in different package systems (rpms for Redhat, Mandrake and SuSE, tgz's for Slackware/Vector, debs for Debian/Libranet/Knoppix...etc) you would have to make sure they all work as expected and you will also have to know these different systems well.

If you're distributing as source, most of the time you'll just tar it up and expect users to read the INSTALL and README files.


Håkan


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