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Old 04-14-2004, 10:08 AM   #1
Meistro666
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2001
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo 2004
Posts: 9

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Installing Gentoo 2004 from scratch, have some questions


I'm installing Gentoo (in VMWare) from scratch using a stage 1 tarball. I just got the part where I did the bootstrap step. I'm just wondering what bootstrap really does?? Is it something like initialization??

Your explanation would be very useful. Thank you.
 
Old 04-14-2004, 10:35 AM   #2
PenguinPwrdBox
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Registered: Oct 2003
Posts: 568

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Doing a Stage 1 install is overkill unless there is a point to it. Example: I have a Compaq Armada 1700 lappy that is a Pentium II @ 350mhz with 192M of RAM. This machine is older than dirt, and was designed to run WIndows 95 exclusively. On this machine, I did a Gentoo 1.4 Stage on install, because it allows you complete control over the way that the machine will boot, and how the hardware is detected and addressed. This particular machine, needs to have CFLAGS set to allow it to use all of the hardware, not to mention, that on most older Compaqs, there is not CMOS on the Mainboard, but instead, all BIOS config is found on a hidden partition, that is wiped when Linux was installed. This can be a huge pain in the ass when it comes to getting things to work when the install is complete. Unless you know what you are doing, and actually have a point in doing it - Start in a Stage 2 - otherwise - you waste a few hours of your life - when you could be playing with your new Gentoo box!
 
Old 04-14-2004, 10:41 AM   #3
Meistro666
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2001
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo 2004
Posts: 9

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
The point for me is to learn. I learn new things by actually using them and trying to get it done the hardest way (Yes more mistakes but also more knowledge). I don't really care to have it running perfectly. I want to know how to fix Linux/Unix related software problems. All the other installs I have done were all prepackaged and never had a problem with the installs.

Doing the Stage 1, I can learn as I go. I learn from my mistakes. I have already restarted installing three times before I even got to the bootstrap portion of the install. For me it is a challenge.

I also think that's what cause me a Co-Op job. Because of no real Linux/Unix experience.

Quote:
Originally posted by PenguinPwrdBox
Doing a Stage 1 install is overkill unless there is a point to it. Example: I have a Compaq Armada 1700 lappy that is a Pentium II @ 350mhz with 192M of RAM. This machine is older than dirt, and was designed to run WIndows 95 exclusively. On this machine, I did a Gentoo 1.4 Stage on install, because it allows you complete control over the way that the machine will boot, and how the hardware is detected and addressed. This particular machine, needs to have CFLAGS set to allow it to use all of the hardware, not to mention, that on most older Compaqs, there is not CMOS on the Mainboard, but instead, all BIOS config is found on a hidden partition, that is wiped when Linux was installed. This can be a huge pain in the ass when it comes to getting things to work when the install is complete. Unless you know what you are doing, and actually have a point in doing it - Start in a Stage 2 - otherwise - you waste a few hours of your life - when you could be playing with your new Gentoo box!
 
Old 04-14-2004, 10:55 AM   #4
PenguinPwrdBox
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Posts: 568

Rep: Reputation: 30
This I can respect, but honestly, there is no point to it unless you have a point, get it? If you wanna do it just to do it, and to try to cram something into that brain of yours on it (I am the exact same way) then do it - but challenge yourself - even if you change NOTHING -read the Gentoo book to find out what you can change before you compile the bootstrap, and if you have nothing else going on - change some things - and check out the results. Odds are you may not need to change anything, but if you follow the docs closely as you go - you'll end up knowing a ton more on the other side of the install. If you really really want good stuff, get deep into compiling the kernel. Thats the third portion, I believe. You'll pick up tons of stuff there. Good luck, and happy learning!!!!!

Edit: By the way - the afformentioned Gentoo book is availible here: http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/index.xml

And if you can't answer something, come on back, and someone here, I garauntee you, will have an answer.....

Last edited by PenguinPwrdBox; 04-14-2004 at 10:59 AM.
 
Old 04-14-2004, 12:06 PM   #5
Meistro666
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2001
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo 2004
Posts: 9

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
That is what I am reading at the same time as doing the install. Yes I have changed options in the bootstrap to see what happens and that's why I also restarted this install already three times. I've been doing this for a good 24 hours now and I can see myself doing this for another few months. LOL. But that is the fun part.

On the part of the bootstrap, I have answered it myself by rereading the handbook.

Again thanks and you will hear lots from me, I assure everybody that is reading this.

Quote:
Originally posted by PenguinPwrdBox
This I can respect, but honestly, there is no point to it unless you have a point, get it? If you wanna do it just to do it, and to try to cram something into that brain of yours on it (I am the exact same way) then do it - but challenge yourself - even if you change NOTHING -read the Gentoo book to find out what you can change before you compile the bootstrap, and if you have nothing else going on - change some things - and check out the results. Odds are you may not need to change anything, but if you follow the docs closely as you go - you'll end up knowing a ton more on the other side of the install. If you really really want good stuff, get deep into compiling the kernel. Thats the third portion, I believe. You'll pick up tons of stuff there. Good luck, and happy learning!!!!!

Edit: By the way - the afformentioned Gentoo book is availible here: http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/index.xml

And if you can't answer something, come on back, and someone here, I garauntee you, will have an answer.....
 
  


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