LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-15-2004, 05:48 PM   #1
SelaAragon
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Cary, NC
Distribution: Gentoo 1.4, Free BSD 5.2.1
Posts: 32

Rep: Reputation: 16
How to install packages with tar.gz extensions?


Hi, the noob is back. I have rpm installation down ok but I have no clue about these .tar.gz extensions. Could someone please explain to me how I extract and install these please? Thx.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 05:55 PM   #2
Komakino
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Somerset, England
Distribution: Slackware 10.2, Slackware 10.0, Ubuntu 9.10
Posts: 1,938

Rep: Reputation: 53
tar zxvf filename.tar.gz (or .tgz, same thing)
tar jxvf filename.bz2 (just a different sort of zipping algorithm)

that will unzip the file which usually contains source code. Most programs will have either a README file or an INSTALL file or both. Read them to find out how to install the program but it's usually just a case of cd'ing to the directory that was just created when you untarred the tarball and typing:
Code:
./configure
make
make install (that one as root to make programs installed for all users)
 
Old 03-15-2004, 05:57 PM   #3
peace
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 214

Rep: Reputation: 31
The file is gziped (compressed) and in a tar archive. You have to extract it:

tar -xzvf filename.tar.gz

Now, whatever is unpacked may be for a binary or for source.

If it is source, here is an "answers" article: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ticle&artid=15

If it is a binary, there should be a README file telling you what to do.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 05:58 PM   #4
Komakino
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Somerset, England
Distribution: Slackware 10.2, Slackware 10.0, Ubuntu 9.10
Posts: 1,938

Rep: Reputation: 53
Should probably explain. The reason that it's .tar.gz is because gzip can only compress one file, so the collection of files is tarred (Tape ARchive) first. Tarring goes back to when most backups were done to tape. Rather than write all the files individually to tape, you tarred them first so you only had one file to write.
The j option with tar tells it that the file was zipped with Bzip2. The z option means Gzip was used. x means eXtract. v is Verbose (tell you what files it's extracting) and f precedes the name of the file.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 09:52 PM   #5
SelaAragon
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Cary, NC
Distribution: Gentoo 1.4, Free BSD 5.2.1
Posts: 32

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Aha. Thanks! This isn't so difficult after all. Actually it's kinda fun not having lamer windows doing everything for me. I did compile one tar.gz but during the process it asked for the path to mozilla and when I told it /usr/lib/mozilla it told me "no such directory". A bit silly considering that this is the correct directory. whereis gave it to me and I even verified it visually. I'm still searching for the gentoo ISO's I think I will remove RedHat and try gentoo. I rather like it's look. The only site I have found them at has all dead links.

Last edited by SelaAragon; 03-15-2004 at 09:57 PM.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 10:34 PM   #6
Pwnz3r
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Lancaster, OH
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 393

Rep: Reputation: 30
Want Gentoo ISOs? Go to http://gentoo.org to get them. Gentoo is advanced to install, but the instructions are very thorough so it's hard to get stuck really. It takes a while to install since things get built from the source (through the uber cool Portage system using the emerge command) but it's worth it. I emerged Firefox with it and everything works right in it unlike when I use the pre-compiled binary version from mozilla.org. 'Tis great stuff. And don't worry, Portage is a lot better than the RPM.

Also, http://forums.gentoo.org is a good place to check out if you get stuck.
 
Old 03-16-2004, 12:27 AM   #7
megaspaz
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Silly Con Valley
Distribution: Red Hat 7.3, Red Hat 9.0
Posts: 2,054

Rep: Reputation: 46
well since you are (maybe were) using redhat, some of those tar.gz packages can be built into rpms. use the command:

rpm -ta *.tar.gz

if the developers have been nice enough to include a spec file, that command will compile the source in the tarball and create rpm files in /usr/src/redhat/RPMS/i386/

 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
can not install the tar(gz,bz2) packages tuzhiyong Linux - General 2 11-23-2004 05:23 PM
install/upgrade packages using tar.gz as opposed to RPM's nishmal Linux - Newbie 2 06-10-2004 11:20 AM
Uninstalling tar.gz packages david911 Linux - Software 3 10-17-2003 06:09 AM
How do you install *.tar.gz packages? DartMol Linux - Newbie 22 03-30-2003 10:43 AM
Can I automate the tar, ./configure, make, and make install of about 50 packages? JoeLinux Linux - General 2 04-13-2002 03:35 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:30 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration