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Old 11-22-2010, 07:09 PM   #1
darkstarbyte
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Cool How to copy one of my dvd's bigger than 4.7 gigs.


Sorry if you get mad when you read this I was kinda trolling so my spelling and grammar will be off so feel free to correct me.

I have a dvd that is 5 gigs and I want to put it on a dvd that is about 4.4 Gigs. Anyone have an idea of software that will reduce the size of one dvd so I can put it on a dvd of smaller size. My dvds at my house are always getting manged and destroyed so I want to burn a dvd that will take the fall and make another copy of the one I do have. I will never redistribute any burned dvds. I saw a recent supreme court ruling that deemed this and using libdvdcss legal.





This really gets me going. When I have a file I want to burn thats 50 Megs bigger than than 4.4gigs on debian systems so it tells me to put in bigger storage, what ever.
 
Old 11-22-2010, 07:31 PM   #2
frankbell
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It might be better to get a double-layer blank DVD.

Double-layers DVD discs will hold up to about twice the amount of data as regular DVDs, can be burned with any standard burning program, and can be read in any contemporary DVD drive.

They can be found almost everywhere blank discs are sold.
 
Old 11-22-2010, 07:41 PM   #3
jefro
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I think you mean a dvd9 to dvd5 in linux. Many posts and how to's if you mean video.

If you mean data then there may be other ways. For example you may be able to create a compressed file system and or compress the data.

Simply using 7-zip may help.
 
Old 11-22-2010, 11:37 PM   #4
darkstarbyte
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One more question. Is there away to use more than 4.4 gigs of my dvds. I would love to be able to use 4.6 and a half gigs on my dvds considering they can hold 4.7 gigs.
 
Old 11-23-2010, 06:56 AM   #5
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkstarbyte View Post
One more question. Is there away to use more than 4.4 gigs of my dvds. I would love to be able to use 4.6 and a half gigs on my dvds considering they can hold 4.7 gigs.
A DVD can hold 4707319808 bytes = 4.3840332 gigabytes.

The 4.7 is when the manufacturers cheat you out of 24 bytes per KB and use 1 KB = 1000 bytes. They calculate:

((4 707 319 808 / 1 000) / 1 000) / 1 000 = 4.70731981 GB

When in fact it should be:

((4 707 319 808 / 1 024) / 1 024) / 1 024 = 4.3840332 GB

The actual size of a DVD is 4.38 GB NOT 4.7 GB.

As for making it fit, well you could try overburn, but I don't recommend it. If the starting media is a video, rip it and split it. If it is something compressible, use 7zip.
 
Old 11-23-2010, 03:36 PM   #6
darkstarbyte
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Well I knew the math because that is how I found out my internet company was ripping me off with bits not bytes. I did not know that dvd companies do the same.
 
Old 11-23-2010, 06:31 PM   #7
John VV
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Quote:
Well I knew the math because that is how I found out my internet company was ripping me off with bits not bytes. I did not know that dvd companies do the same.
add hard drive manufactures to that list , they do it too.

or more precisely the PR/advertising company’s that think it LOOKS better to use a bigger number than the REAL one
 
Old 11-23-2010, 06:34 PM   #8
TobiSGD
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I don't get that, there isn't any cheating in calculating bytes from bits.
 
Old 11-24-2010, 02:24 AM   #9
darkstarbyte
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Well there are 8 bits in a byte right. Then there are 1024 bytes in a kilobyte. 1024 kilobytes make one megabyte. Internet companies round of the 1024 to 1000 and instead of you getting 1 megabyte in speed you will get a lot less considering they round off the thousand and they give you 1 megabit. The Internet companies rip you off in two way in 1024 thing and the bit byte thing.

For instance when you see an add for 8 mega bits and an add for 1 mega byte you might be tempted to go for the mega byte because it sound bigger but 1 mega byte is faster than eight mega bits. I will show you with a comparison.

With 1 mega byte you get this many bits per second: 8388608

With 8 mega bits you get this many bits per second: 8000000

I truly thought at one time only Internet companies did this but I see other companies do this to save them money when they make you a dvd or hard drive.
 
Old 11-24-2010, 03:00 AM   #10
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
I don't get that, there isn't any cheating in calculating bytes from bits.
But, they don't do that, they say 1 KB = 1000 bytes = 8000 bits instead of 1 KB = 1024 bytes = 8192 bits. They could not re-define 1 byte = 8 bits.
 
Old 11-24-2010, 04:07 AM   #11
John VV
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- example-
comcast 8 meg cable is not 8 megabyte of transfer rate but 8 megabit


however transfer rate is defined as byte/sec
and when you dl something look at the rate it is byte/sec and not bit/sec

it sounds to the average person that a 8 meg connection is good
but it is only 1 megabyte / sec. = 8megibit/sec Aprox.


all this FUD sells services but makes a VERY BIG mess of things
 
Old 11-24-2010, 06:46 AM   #12
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John VV View Post
- example-
comcast 8 meg cable is not 8 megabyte of transfer rate but 8 megabit


however transfer rate is defined as byte/sec
and when you dl something look at the rate it is byte/sec and not bit/sec

it sounds to the average person that a 8 meg connection is good
but it is only 1 megabyte / sec. = 8megibit/sec Aprox.


all this FUD sells services but makes a VERY BIG mess of things
Actually, a more accurate estimate is divide by 10 instead of 8 ... simply because it never is as good as they advertise. For example for a 2 Gbit connection, you will actually get 200 MB/s instead of the supposed 250 MB/s. At least this is what I've found for every single ISP I've ever tried. Recently my connection speed went up a bit, maybe 230 MB/s or so.
 
Old 11-24-2010, 04:33 PM   #13
darkstarbyte
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Can I get that in the us and how much is it.
 
  


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