LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-05-2003, 12:39 PM   #1
brian0918
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Posts: 87

Rep: Reputation: 15
don't have permissions?


Newb alert.

I installed redhat linux 8, and during the install, it told me to create a login account _besides the administrator_ for me to log in to. So i created one.. Now, when I log in to that, it says i don't have permission to access some folders, like \root. How do I either:

Assign all administrative permissions to this new login account
or
Login to the supposed administrator account?


 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:00 PM   #2
david_ross
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Scotland
Distribution: Slackware, RedHat, Debian
Posts: 12,047

Rep: Reputation: 66
The whole idea of a root account is so that normal users - even your self cannot accidently or intentionally remove system files, programs and configurations etc. if you need admin rights for maintainance use the command "su -" you will then be asked for the root password.
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:00 PM   #3
Mara
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Location: Grenoble
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 9,569

Rep: Reputation: 171Reputation: 171
/root is administrator home directory, so normal users shouldn't be able to get to the files inside.

You can log in as administrator when you choose to login as 'root', not your normal user and type the right password (you entered it during installation).
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:14 PM   #4
cuckoopint
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 797

Rep: Reputation: 30
before you go running root for everything, go do some reading. root (or su -) should only be used when you dont have rights to it and you have to run it (ie. running X as root is a big no-no). Maybe if you post things that you would like to do, but only possible as root, we can tell you better ways to go about it. as for day to day use you should have no reason to use the root account -- assuming you used windows you need to get out of the mindset that you must feel privileged to have an Admin account. Admin in windows is not root in linux.
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:41 PM   #5
brian0918
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Posts: 87

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
well

the current annoyance of mine is having to type in the root password to run anything.
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:44 PM   #6
david_ross
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Scotland
Distribution: Slackware, RedHat, Debian
Posts: 12,047

Rep: Reputation: 66
Run "anything"?

What can't you run as yourself?
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:48 PM   #7
brian0918
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Posts: 87

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
i'm not logged onto the root "administrator" account, im on the separate account i made.

i've noticed that there were several things that i would run and it would pop up a root password request before i could run them

its saying i need administrative privileges to run them. (such as the system settings, etc)

Last edited by brian0918; 04-05-2003 at 01:50 PM.
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:56 PM   #8
Mara
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Location: Grenoble
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 9,569

Rep: Reputation: 171Reputation: 171
I guess they were programs where you can change settings. Normal programs won't ask for root password.
Configure everything you need (or want) to. Then there will be no need to run the programs very often...
 
Old 04-05-2003, 01:59 PM   #9
david_ross
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Scotland
Distribution: Slackware, RedHat, Debian
Posts: 12,047

Rep: Reputation: 66
Like I said in post 2
Quote:
Originally posted by david_ross
The whole idea of a root account is so that normal users - even your self cannot accidently or intentionally remove system files, programs and configurations etc. if you need admin rights for maintainance use the command "su -" you will then be asked for the root password.
If you want to be able to do these things all of the time then just login as root. Most people do their admin from a bash prompt. Login in as your self then "su -" to gaet root privilages then exit when you are done.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
file permissions OK, but command permissions? stabu Linux - General 2 10-05-2005 01:00 PM
permission ... permissions .... permissions alaios Linux - General 1 05-31-2005 05:16 AM
Permissions jymmi Linux - Newbie 3 04-15-2005 12:43 AM
Permissions help reddog64 Linux - Newbie 1 04-22-2004 06:23 PM
getting a directory's permissions and creating a new one with the same permissions newbie1000101 Programming 1 04-10-2004 01:52 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:28 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration