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Old 01-17-2005, 06:00 PM   #1
ch.keller
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Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Kelowna
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Difference between ext2, ext3 & reiser file systems


I intend to instal Linux (Suse or RH) on my Windows computer 98 SE on a second hard drive. Before I do that I have a couple of questions:
1. Which is the most advanced file system in Linux, is it ext2, or ext3, or reiser?
I understand that ext2 can easily create crashes if you do not umount a device;
I don't know if this hearsay or if it is true.


2. I plan to disconnect to primary hard drive, so that I will not disturb Windows
98 SE, nor the data, and then boot Linux to the secondary hard disk from
the Boot disk (Suse or RH) and then partition it as follows:
150 MB Non-DOS partition for /boot
1024 Non-DOS partition for /Swap
The balance of the drive should be a non-DOS partition as / for Linux use,
programs , and data.

When Linux will be hopefully working, I will reconnect the primary hard disk.

How can I install the bootloader GRUB ? Should it be installed on the
secondary hard disk or on the first?

Your help and guidance will be most valuable.


Charles.

Desktop Computer with AMD, 1.93 GHz Speed
RAM 512 MB
Hard disk o = 80 GB (for Windows 98 SE) partitioned: 4 x 20 GB
Hard disk 1 = 40 GB (for Linux)
 
Old 01-17-2005, 06:44 PM   #2
jailbait
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Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Blue Ridge Mountain
Distribution: Debian Wheezy, Debian Jessie
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"1. Which is the most advanced file system in Linux, is it ext2, or ext3, or reiser? "

Ext3 is a journaling version of ext2. Reiserfs is a journeling file system. A journeling file system occupies more space and is slower than ext2.

"I understand that ext2 can easily create crashes if you do not umount a device;
I don't know if this hearsay or if it is true."

If you shut down without umounting a partition then that partition should be checked and all defects fixed before you use it again. Ext2 takes longer to check and fix than either ext3 or reiserfs. The main advantage to a journaling file sytem is that it is easier to repair.

"How can I install the bootloader GRUB ? Should it be installed on the
secondary hard disk or on the first?"

It should be installed on the first. You can choose not to install the bootloader anywhere and instead create a boot floppy to boot from until you reconnect /dev/hda. After you reconnect /dev/hda you can install a bootloader on the MBR and quit using the boot floppy.

----------------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 01-17-2005, 07:07 PM   #3
cs-cam
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Registered: May 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Gentoo
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ext3 is exactly the same as ext2 but with a journal, you can swap between the two without formatting using mke2fs, that's how similar they are, however ext2 is a nightmare to fix after a hard reset in my experience. I currently use ext3 and it's great, never a problem I love it. ReiserFS is newer than ext, more modular and I've never used it so I can't comment.

And as was said above, GRUB should be installed on the MBR of the primary disk
 
Old 01-18-2005, 06:06 PM   #4
ch.keller
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Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Kelowna
Posts: 21

Original Poster
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Memo to Steve Stites and Packman-AUS:
Thank you for your valuable input re file system differences.
Now I have another question:
I did not know that in Linux there is another filesystem called "Swap". How does it differ from Ext3?
Do I need
Ext3 and SWAP or will Ext3 suffice? When installing Linux (Suse 9.0 for example) do I have first to create a non-DOS Partition for SWAP or for Ext3 ?

I know I have to create two partition: One for /boot and one for / , but what about
SWAP or Ext3 ?

I would appreciated it very much, if you could make that clearer for me.

Thank you very much for your help.

Charles.
 
Old 01-18-2005, 06:16 PM   #5
cs-cam
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Registered: May 2004
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/boot and / are your traditional partitions, they require a filesystem such as extX or ReiserFS, I personally use ext2 for /boot and ext3 for /. Swap is something completely different, it's just like virtual RAM, you don't desperately need to have it but it's nice if you don't have a lot of memory in your system. This is how my hda is setup:
Code:
/dev/hda1 - ext2 - 32MB  - /boot
/dev/hda2 - swap - 700MB - none
/dev/hda3 - ext3 - 25GB  - /
/dev/hda4 - ext3 - 170GB - /home
 
  


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