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Ronayn 02-06-2012 07:40 AM

Configuring ssh for a cluster of 12 computers for a single account
 
Hello,

I've been using rsh and rlogin for many years on clusters (using RedHat 7 through FC6 OS). Currently, I am trying to configure a cluster with Fedora 14, and I noticed that the man pages mention that rsh/rlogin are deprecated and the ssh should be used instead.

The first quesion I have is: Are rsh/rlogin going to disappear at some point; leaving only ssh? The clusters I work on are on their own private network (unconnected to anything else), so I dont need ssh for security. However, if rsh/rlogin are going to disappear at some point, I'd like to switch over to ssh now.

I've done some research on ssh, and managed to get it working between two nodes on the cluster -- but it required a bit of user input to work (using ssh-keygen and ssh-copy-id). It appears I have to not only create a key on each account, but also register that key on each node I will be connecting to. That's a lot of work for setting up these 12 computers. And heaven forbid I am ever required to do it for more than 1 account!

Anyhow, I figured that their has to be a way to automate this process or at least speed it up a little. Any advice would be appreciated!

klearview 02-06-2012 08:35 AM

SSH equivalent of rsh is host-based authentication - with host-based authentication there are no passwords or keys to present provided that usernames are the same.

Ronayn 02-07-2012 05:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klearview (Post 4595046)
SSH equivalent of rsh is host-based authentication - with host-based authentication there are no passwords or keys to present provided that usernames are the same.

I am not sure if you did not understand the question, or perhaps you are unfamiliar with setting up ssh, because your answer doesnt follow the information I got from a general search on the internet (http://superuser.com/questions/8077/...pe-my-password).

To further clarify my original post, the 12 computers each have a user account called "weasel".

klearview 02-07-2012 09:21 AM

Quote:

I am not sure if you did not understand the question
I understood your question.

That page solely describes user public key based authentication. So what? I'm suggesting that another authentication - host-based, is SSH equivalent to your rsh set-up (albeit with more security).

Quote:

perhaps you are unfamiliar with setting up ssh
Lol, thank you, now will you kindly <deleted>.

Ronayn 02-07-2012 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klearview (Post 4596006)
I understood your question.

That page solely describes user public key based authentication. So what? I'm suggesting that another authentication - host-based, is SSH equivalent to your rsh set-up (albeit with more security).

Lol, thank you, now will you kindly piss off.

Your initial response to my thread was an unhelpful cryptic one-liner, that didn't answer the question as I asked it.

Tinkster 02-08-2012 01:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klearview (Post 4596006)
I understood your question.


That page solely describes user public key based authentication. So what? I'm suggesting that another authentication - host-based, is SSH equivalent to your rsh set-up (albeit with more security).


Lol, thank you, now will you kindly accept my apologies for being so unhelpful.

Please refrain from unhelpful comments, and from offending other members.



Cheers,
Tink

Turbocapitalist 02-08-2012 05:54 AM

To use key-based authentication, you must load your public key into the file ~/.ssh/authorized_keys on each host in the pool. You can use the same keys on more than one host. Also, if you use an agent on your client, then you only need to enter the pass phrase once.

Host-based authentication also uses keys, but the authentication occurs at the host level. Of course it can be fine-tuned but, the basic set up is to allow ALL users from host X onto host Y via SSH if they have first logged into host X.

RSH should have been phased out in the 1990's and replaced completely by SSH since it is so insecure.


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