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-   -   Can BIND be used with a dynamic IP address? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-software-2/can-bind-be-used-with-a-dynamic-ip-address-437912/)

daihard 04-23-2006 01:26 AM

Can BIND be used with a dynamic IP address?
 
Hi.

I would like to set up a personal DNS server at home so I can use it in addition to those specified by my ISP. Is it possible to use BIND to do that when you only have a dynamic IP address and all your computers are behind a DHCP router?

Thanks!
Dai

paul_mat 04-23-2006 02:20 AM

check out version 8 of http://www.yourhowto.org/uploads/serversetup/

or

http://www.yourhowto.org/content/view/36/9/

daihard 04-23-2006 02:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul_mat

Thanks for the info. I read the latter link. The instructions seem to indicate that you must have DHCP running on the machine where you want to set up a DNS server. Did I read it correctly? What I'd like to do is use the DHCP capability of my router yet set up a separate DNS server using a Linux computer. Am I making sense?

mackdav 04-24-2006 08:14 AM

The answer to the question depends on what you want to do.

If you want your local systems to be able to use the DNS server (as a local concentrator or cache server, or to locally serve your own internal DNS information), then it doesn't matter what IP address it has as long as your local systems can find it. In this scenario you'd have a private network behind a firewall, and the firewall would manage connections to the internet.

If you want systems on the internet to do lookups against your DNS server (ie if you are going to try to host your own DNS domain), the answer is no -- the internet needs to know where your DNS server is before it can use it.

daihard 04-24-2006 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mackdav
If you want your local systems to be able to use the DNS server (as a local concentrator or cache server, or to locally serve your own internal DNS information), then it doesn't matter what IP address it has as long as your local systems can find it. In this scenario you'd have a private network behind a firewall, and the firewall would manage connections to the internet.

That's exactly what I want to do. I don't need the outside world to look at my DNS server. All I want to do is keep my own DNS server in case the provider's servers act up, which often happens.


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