LinuxQuestions.org
View the Most Wanted LQ Wiki articles.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-01-2009, 03:35 PM   #1
numtre
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10
Posts: 45

Rep: Reputation: 15
Backup question


Hello
I'm pretty new to Linux, I've been using it for a couple of months not (perhaps less)
and was wondering whats the best backup solution

I mean, if I get a crash, I dont want to only recover my documents, but also my settings and programs
Is this possible?

I am coming from Apple systems and they have an elegant solution in time machine, but even without it I knew what to backup to have my system as it was before

Any help is MUCH apreciated as right now this is my major concern when using Linux

Many thx and long live free software

aleX
 
Old 01-01-2009, 03:55 PM   #2
fuzzyworm
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Stroud, UK
Distribution: Kubuntu, Debian
Posts: 149

Rep: Reputation: 15
I have just installed Areca on my Windows Vista machine, it is a platform independent (Java based) backup solution. I haven't (yet) tried the Linux version, but fully intend to. It works by doing incremental backups of specified folders, which you can then schedule using cron.

As for exactly which files to backup, that would depend entirely on your system.

If you're using all open source/free software, then you needn't backup the programs themselves, but to save time on downloading, it may be worth your while to backup the install files, in case you have to reformat your HDD or something.

Most of your settings are probably contained within your home folder, though you may have customised some more general things. In most systems that I have worked with, any settings not contained in your home folder are contained in files in a folder called "/etc".

Since Linux (and also Mac, I believe) uses config files in preference to a central registry, backing up these settings is a simple matter of backing up the relevant files. Make sure you do back up your entire home folder though!

Also, though I haven't checked it out other than a passing glance, there is "flyback" available from Google Code:
http://code.google.com/p/flyback/
This is modelled on Time Machine and the screenshots look pretty

Hope this helps.

Also, in future posts, it would be worth mentioning, amongst other things, which distribution (distro) you are using, as it will help people to work out the best solution to your problem.

For example, if you are using Ubuntu or Debian, then the program downloads will be in one specific place (usually "/var/cache/apt/archives").

Last edited by fuzzyworm; 01-01-2009 at 03:59 PM. Reason: Mention Distro
 
Old 01-01-2009, 04:24 PM   #3
Brian1
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: Seymour, Indiana
Distribution: Distribution: RHEL 5 with Pieces of this and that. Kernel 2.6.23.1, KDE 3.5.8 and KDE 4.0 beta, Plu
Posts: 5,700

Rep: Reputation: 61
Well I have a USB drive that I use ghost for linux live cd to mirror the drive. I do it once a month at night. It is the same interface as the computer harddrive so if the drive does crash I can remove the one from the USB case and install in machine. Up and going in a few minutes. Then I have a second hard drive in the system where I occasionally copy data over the monthly period. I have a cron that will copy my home directory and /etc directory. This is where most configuration files will pertain to a system. Other data like songs and movies are backed up on another usb drive that is attached to another machine. My firefox bookmarks and thunderbird email is copied daily as well. Acts as NAS for me. Backup is very crude but works for me. But the above post would be a good one for backup.

Brian
 
Old 01-06-2009, 01:33 PM   #4
numtre
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10
Posts: 45

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
I'm clearly a bit confused about what is where
See I come from Mac OS X and I'm now using ubuntu quite smoothly

Some things I don't understand though, like the location of my settings. Where are they exacly? On a mac they are in Library/Preferences, so if I want to backup an app and its settings i generally just need that... where are the apps settings on linux?

I need a guide explaining me what goes where any help/link is appreciated

as for the backup thing, after having a browse on the net, I think I will go for rsync, I just need to understand what I need to backup beside my home folder then I'm good to go

Thx a lot!
 
Old 01-06-2009, 02:47 PM   #5
jailbait
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Blue Ridge Mountain
Distribution: Debian Wheezy, Debian Jessie
Posts: 7,533

Rep: Reputation: 178Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by numtre View Post

Some things I don't understand though, like the location of my settings. Where are they exacly? On a mac they are in Library/Preferences, so if I want to backup an app and its settings i generally just need that... where are the apps settings on linux?

as for the backup thing, after having a browse on the net, I think I will go for rsync, I just need to understand what I need to backup beside my home folder then I'm good to go
Per user application settings are in /home. System wide settings for both applications and the system are usually in /etc.

I recommend that you back up your entire system instead of guessing which bits and pieces you might need to restore in the future. If you back up everything with the rsynch -a option then the first backup will copy everything. Subsequent backups will only copy files which have been updated since the previous backup.

---------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 01-06-2009, 03:09 PM   #6
farslayer
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Willoughby, Ohio
Distribution: linuxdebian
Posts: 7,228
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 189Reputation: 189
in addition to flyback there is Ubuntu's Time Vault also modeled after Time machine

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TimeVault
 
Old 01-07-2009, 06:24 PM   #7
numtre
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10
Posts: 45

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
In the end Im going to use remastersys to have a nice image of my stable system

i could do more in the future if i feel i need it

then i would only backup my home using rsync

thanks everyone

PS: we have to give it to apple when it comes to timemachine, it's brilliant although in the end remastersys+rsync is more flexible as i can get an image of my stable system, and go back to it if needed. I cant do this with time machine, as if i got a crash i am stuck with the latest version of my system if i remember correctly.
 
  


Reply

Tags
backup


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
backup question d1l2w3 Mandriva 8 01-08-2006 08:56 PM
backup question blockme Debian 3 05-28-2004 07:08 PM
Backup question gchandler Red Hat 1 05-24-2004 02:55 PM
Backup Question tuxedo-notebook Linux - General 5 04-16-2004 11:26 AM
Backup question chuck77 Linux - General 1 03-21-2002 02:45 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:40 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration