LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-04-2007, 10:56 AM   #1
datavirtue
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
Application Performance under KDE & GNOME


What should I know about application performance under KDE and GNOME. It just seems excruciatingly slow. I have setup beefy machines and whimpy ones and application performance under KDE and GNOme is rediculous. Java apps are very slow even with a new JRE installed.

slackware 10.1, KDE 3.2, GNOME 2.6, 128MB RAM

When I test my console java apps it is viciously fast (blows windows away) but on a desktop this user interface is sloth like!! what is the deal? Would it help to compile a different kernal? Linux cannot be taken seriously unless you can have blazing user interfce. We have all had our fill of crappy GUI systems. What could possibly be causing such delays in a system that has no legacy requirments?

Please don't blame my memory/hardware as under Windows 2000 with the same harxdware the applications run very very well.

I find it hard that a spagehtti factory like Microsoft can make a user interface work so well.



Sean
 
Old 03-04-2007, 03:03 PM   #2
J.W.
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 6,642

Rep: Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by datavirtue
slackware 10.1, KDE 3.2, GNOME 2.6, 128MB RAM

When I test my console java apps it is viciously fast (blows windows away) but on a desktop this user interface is sloth like!! what is the deal?
I don't know what kind of apps you are running, but what kind of video card do you have, and do you have other things running in the background that are putting a big demand on the system? In particular, on my rig, if I don't have the 3-D drivers installed the CPU will be forced to take on the screen rendering that otherwise would be handled by the GPU. (Try this - select an OpenGL screen saver such as Euphoria, start it, then monitor your CPU usage. If it's pretty much running at 99% or 100% when running the screen saver, then that might be a clue as to why you are seeing poor performance)

Similarly, are you running any programs in the background that are consuming a lot of resources?
 
Old 03-04-2007, 03:21 PM   #3
datavirtue
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
No overhead that I know of

Quote:
Originally Posted by J.W.
I don't know what kind of apps you are running, but what kind of video card do you have, and do you have other things running in the background that are putting a big demand on the system? In particular, on my rig, if I don't have the 3-D drivers installed the CPU will be forced to take on the screen rendering that otherwise would be handled by the GPU. (Try this - select an OpenGL screen saver such as Euphoria, start it, then monitor your CPU usage. If it's pretty much running at 99% or 100% when running the screen saver, then that might be a clue as to why you are seeing poor performance)

Similarly, are you running any programs in the background that are consuming a lot of resources?

I just install Slackware 10.1, start KDE or GNOME, run my app, thats it. Everything is slow in GUI. I just have a regular integrated I815 graphics chipset. This is a Compaq Presario PIII 733Mhz and 128MB RAM.

How do I monitor CPU usage?


I look at Linux from a regular user's point of view, I've been told though that linux is not for regular users and that it is for geeks. So I don't know why I bother getting my apps to run in linux. Every time I ask a technical queston in these forums it is almost completely ignored.

Since this thing installs and runs (slowly) I just figured there is something simple I'm missing. I've read endless dribble about how fast linux is and when I start it up and try to do something it is VERY SLOW! Emabarrasingly slow.

Sean
 
Old 03-04-2007, 04:10 PM   #4
J.W.
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 6,642

Rep: Reputation: 69
To monitor a number of aspects of your system, try using gkrellm
 
Old 03-04-2007, 04:30 PM   #5
95se
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Windsor, ON, CA
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 740

Rep: Reputation: 32
Have you configured X yet? If you're a first time user, and not very geeky, at that, then why are you using one of the geekier distros? I think there are other distros more suited to you, such as Ubuntu, Suse, Fedora, etc. These will handle much more of the configuration for you. Slackware kind of assumes you know how to configure linux for your system already, and doesn't do much for you in that way. If you have no idea how to do this, then try one of the distros I mentioned. Ubuntu is really amazing, so I'm going to suggest that. If I had to guess, given the very limited information you gave, I'd say your using the vesa driver for X, and not the one for the Intel integrated graphics your using. On an older computer, this will give pretty sluggish UI performance.
 
Old 03-04-2007, 04:45 PM   #6
datavirtue
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
System Monitor

Quote:
Originally Posted by J.W.
To monitor a number of aspects of your system, try using gkrellm

I've monitored the system and can see no abnormal memory usage. My java app for instance uses a little less memory than windows does.


I guess the performance is ok, I'm just used to my new Dual core with Nvidia.

Things just seem sluggish for the system I'm using to test all this. Like I said the performance is much "snappier" under windows 2000 SP4 JRE 1.5.0_08 than under KDE 3.2 JRE 1.5.0_09


It does get much better after the JVM JIT's the methods but over all the interface is sluggish.

It takes several seconds to start KWord for instance. If I tried to demo this to someone in a small business they would ask me what was wrong with it. So I'm being kinda anal here for that reason.

Is it just that Linux has greater hardware requirements?
Sean
 
Old 03-04-2007, 04:54 PM   #7
datavirtue
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
euphoria test

Quote:
Originally Posted by 95se
Have you configured X yet? If you're a first time user, and not very geeky, at that, then why are you using one of the geekier distros? I think there are other distros more suited to you, such as Ubuntu, Suse, Fedora, etc. These will handle much more of the configuration for you. Slackware kind of assumes you know how to configure linux for your system already, and doesn't do much for you in that way. If you have no idea how to do this, then try one of the distros I mentioned. Ubuntu is really amazing, so I'm going to suggest that. If I had to guess, given the very limited information you gave, I'd say your using the vesa driver for X, and not the one for the Intel integrated graphics your using. On an older computer, this will give pretty sluggish UI performance.

the euphoria test of course pegged the CPU, what should i do


I have never liked any distro but slackware (through all the cussing)


I dont know about the geek thing; i've just spent the last several years with Java and have had no time for anything else. I'm just now starting serious experiements with slackware and other systems and I've no vacation forever and I am starting to get burnt. So please overlook my frustrations.

Sean

Last edited by datavirtue; 03-04-2007 at 04:59 PM.
 
Old 03-06-2007, 12:10 AM   #8
J.W.
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 6,642

Rep: Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by datavirtue
the euphoria test of course pegged the CPU, what should i do
What kind of video card do you have? Basically what you want to do is make sure that a.) you've got the correct drivers installed, and b.) that your xorg.conf is appropriate for your card. In more detail,

* If you're using an ATI card, their support of Linux is, umm, shall we say "variable". If you use nVidia, go to their site, download and install the latest Linux drivers.

* Post the output of the command "lsmod" (which lists the kernel modules that have been loaded)

* Post your xorg.conf file (which is in the /etc/X11 directory)
 
Old 03-06-2007, 07:39 AM   #9
datavirtue
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
lsmod and xorg.conf

Quote:
Originally Posted by J.W.
What kind of video card do you have? Basically what you want to do is make sure that a.) you've got the correct drivers installed, and b.) that your xorg.conf is appropriate for your card. In more detail,

* If you're using an ATI card, their support of Linux is, umm, shall we say "variable". If you use nVidia, go to their site, download and install the latest Linux drivers.

* Post the output of the command "lsmod" (which lists the kernel modules that have been loaded)

* Post your xorg.conf file (which is in the /etc/X11 directory)

I wouldn't call it a video card, maybe chipset (i810 driver i815 chipset)

http://www.datavirtue.com/other/lsmod.txt

http://www.datavirtue.com/other/xorg.conf.txt

On startup is says: maximum memory to use for video memory 94mb!! Maybe a little much?


Sean

Last edited by datavirtue; 03-06-2007 at 07:42 AM.
 
Old 03-07-2007, 09:30 PM   #10
J.W.
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 6,642

Rep: Reputation: 69
(Sorry for the late reply.) Clearly your video (onboard) can be a bottleneck if you are running apps that have intensive video demands. Specifically, I will guess that Direct Rendering is not enabled in your system. To confirm, run
Code:
glxinfo | grep direct
What you want to see is: "direct rendering: Yes" If you see "No", then you want to enable it. It looks like you are loading dri, but you may need to add the following to xorg.conf
Code:
Section "DRI"
    Group      "video"
    Mode       0660
EndSection
Just put it at the bottom of xorg.conf, save your changes, exit X, then restart X. I'm not sure if that will enable DRI, but either way it's about all I can suggest. If the Java apps you mentioned at the top of the thread involve heavy video loads, then the lack of direct rendering could be the culprit. Good luck with it
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gnome/KDE Desktop Folder & Gnome Autostart ihatethedekoys Linux - General 1 08-07-2006 11:16 AM
Creating & Exiting Tray Icon in KDE & GNOME pihu Linux - General 0 09-07-2005 02:02 AM
Small fonts in Gnome application when running KDE Artik Debian 16 05-29-2005 11:25 AM
Xorg 6.8.2 and KDE 3.4 & poor xine performance Phathead Slackware 14 03-31-2005 02:09 AM
How to install QT&GTK* without GNOME & KDE? VertX Debian 2 02-15-2005 01:27 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:37 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration